Guys I REALLY need your help!
   

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Guys I REALLY need your help!

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    04-20-2013, 05:39 PM
  #1
Weanling
Guys I REALLY need your help!

Well as some of you know, I'm currently looking for a first horse and I think I've found one. The problem is that it's current owners don't care for it (its kept at the barn where I work) and they don't want want to pay board on it and they offered to give her to the barn owner but she said she would just end up taking her to the zoo to feed the cats. And it seems that no one wants this horse! They have till the 1st to get rid of her ( the BO is kicking the owners out) or she will take her over to animal control. About the horse: she's around 18 and an Egyptian Arab. I don't know how many hands she is but she's on the smaller side, but not quite a pony. I dunno, would it be a waste of time? I just feel so bad for the poor horse cause the owners ignore it and only care for their other two horses. Thanks,
-lu
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    04-20-2013, 05:44 PM
  #2
Trained
Look at it objectively. Do you like the horse because she's a good match for you or because you feel sorry for her? If it's the latter, don't buy her. Offer to help the owners find a home for her.

Also, how are they "not taking care of her?" Do they just not pay attention to her/ride her or is she seriously neglected (no hoof care, wormy, skinny, etc)? Why don't they want her? What's her training? How is she to handle? Do you ANYTHING about her other than her age and breed?
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    04-20-2013, 05:54 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
Look at it objectively. Do you like the horse because she's a good match for you or because you feel sorry for her? If it's the latter, don't buy her. Offer to help the owners find a home for her.

Also, how are they "not taking care of her?" Do they just not pay attention to her/ride her or is she seriously neglected (no hoof care, wormy, skinny, etc)? Why don't they want her? What's her training? How is she to handle? Do you ANYTHING about her other than her age and breed?
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I haven't really spent time with her but she is friendly and loves to be groomed and petted. She's been trained in English I believe but has been ridden western by a kid recently. She was originally a rescue and when they got her and wormed her, literal PILES of worms came out of her. I think they haven't had her teeth floated or feet done in awhil (I'll check tomorrow) she is a little pushy due to not being worked with seriously in a while and the owners can't ride her because they are way too heavy and they can't get her to move. Plus they are focused more on their other two horses. And she isn't terribly skinny, she just needs more muscle.
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    04-20-2013, 06:03 PM
  #4
Trained
Here's what I'd do...

1) Ask the owners if you can work with her, at least on the ground. Tell them that you may be interested in buying her, but only if you work well together (maybe even let them know that you're looking for your first horse and you want it to be the right one).

2) Find out how much they want for her.

3) Work with her as often as you can to see how well you get along. This is an important one. I know that some people (myself and my best friend included) don't work well with mares. Sure, I can work with a mare, but it isn't an enjoyable, relaxing experience for me.

4) Find out as much about her medical and care history as you can.
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    04-20-2013, 06:09 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
Here's what I'd do...

1) Ask the owners if you can work with her, at least on the ground. Tell them that you may be interested in buying her, but only if you work well together (maybe even let them know that you're looking for your first horse and you want it to be the right one).

2) Find out how much they want for her.

3) Work with her as often as you can to see how well you get along. This is an important one. I know that some people (myself and my best friend included) don't work well with mares. Sure, I can work with a mare, but it isn't an enjoyable, relaxing experience for me.

4) Find out as much about her medical and care history as you can.
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Ok thanks for your advice :)
I will try that tomorrow. I'll talk to the BO first and see if I can maybe use her in the lessons I have on Tuesday to see how we get along. I will try to talk to the owners too even though tensions between them and the BO are high. And I was thinking that since she is smaller, would it be possible to train her to pull a small cart?
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    04-20-2013, 06:14 PM
  #6
Trained
The BO has no say in whether the mare is used in lessons or not. That is solely up to the owner. Also, if she hasn't had her teeth done in a while, she may need those done before being ridden to avoid causing her pain.

Any horse, regardless of size, can be trained to pull a cart. Heck, if he takes to it, I want to train my 16.2hh draft cross to pull a cart. It's whether or not the horse will take to pulling a cart that's the thing to consider.
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    04-20-2013, 06:21 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
The BO has no say in whether the mare is used in lessons or not. That is solely up to the owner. Also, if she hasn't had her teeth done in a while, she may need those done before being ridden to avoid causing her pain.

Any horse, regardless of size, can be trained to pull a cart. Heck, if he takes to it, I want to train my 16.2hh draft cross to pull a cart. It's whether or not the horse will take to pulling a cart that's the thing to consider.
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True, I'll ask the owners about it. But the problem is that they are way to 'nosey' and micromanage the horse ( just recently a girl was leasing it and they stopped because the owner said that 'the girl wasn't riding her correctly' so I'm going to tell the owners straight up that I don't want that to happen if I do end up buying.) even though they don't really care for her. But would it just be a waste because of her age and how much work she would need?
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    04-20-2013, 06:30 PM
  #8
Trained
She's still got years left in her. Getting her teeth looked at would be your biggest hurdle. After that, it'd just be getting her back into work.

I'm going to be completely honest with you here. I think for a first horse, this mare just sounds like too much work. You don't know how much work she'll need to become what you want or even she could be what you want. Arabs can also be a handful. They don't necessicarily tolerate mistakes as well as other breeds. My best friend had an older Arab mare who was a spitfire. Could go all day and still have energy to spare. She was ended up having a hormonal issue (vet said it was basically like horsey menopause) that was not only expensive to manage, but made her unpredictable. She had a mare stalled next to her (by accident) and ended up bowing the tendons in both front legs because she was charging the fence at the other mare. Not saying that's what will happen with this mare, but just something to consider.
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    04-20-2013, 06:38 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
She's still got years left in her. Getting her teeth looked at would be your biggest hurdle. After that, it'd just be getting her back into work.

I'm going to be completely honest with you here. I think for a first horse, this mare just sounds like too much work. You don't know how much work she'll need to become what you want or even she could be what you want. Arabs can also be a handful. They don't necessicarily tolerate mistakes as well as other breeds. My best friend had an older Arab mare who was a spitfire. Could go all day and still have energy to spare. She was ended up having a hormonal issue (vet said it was basically like horsey menopause) that was not only expensive to manage, but made her unpredictable. She had a mare stalled next to her (by accident) and ended up bowing the tendons in both front legs because she was charging the fence at the other mare. Not saying that's what will happen with this mare, but just something to consider.
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You may be right about her being difficult as a first horse, she doesn't have the typical Arab attitude and is kept in a natural herd setting so I don't have to worry about her going after the other mares. And the most difficult part would probably be getting muscle on her and retraining all of the stuff that the owners screwed up, although some retraining has bred done (she no longer gallops back to the barn while you're riding her lol)
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    04-20-2013, 06:39 PM
  #10
Weanling
Plus I'm worried about worms, because I think she's become ammune to the wormer (if that's possible)
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