Has anyone trained their own horse succesfully? - Page 3
   

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Has anyone trained their own horse succesfully?

This is a discussion on Has anyone trained their own horse succesfully? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Anyone buy a trained 4 year old for a first horse?
  • Owner is not letting me train their horse properly

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    07-22-2012, 03:55 AM
  #21
Foal
I got my boy at four months, broke him in ourselves, he is 6 now and 14.2hh !:) and my girl, 13.1hh we got her when she was nine months old and broke her in all by ourselves! (me and mum)!
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    07-22-2012, 04:12 AM
  #22
Foal
Man I wasn't finished with my post and it posted, stupid laptop here is the rest. Pictures of Magic at a playday last summer.
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    07-22-2012, 06:38 AM
  #23
Foal
Love Magic! Just gorgeous :)

Whether or not you can train your own horse depends on how much experience you have, your personality, the horse's personality, your goals, and I'm sure a variety of other things.

Green+green = black&blue is a tried and true saying.

I would say that unless you have trained a horse with a trainer present and it went well then it's not a good plan to try it without a trainer helping you along the first time.

I trained a horse for the first time myself, without a trainer, and it did go well. When we finally did take a lesson my trainer was impressed by how well she did. I ended up selling her a short time later and her new owners were very pleased with her training.
BUT...
She had that personality that is just so level headed to start with and was extremely smart. I did not push her because she was young, we had time. She learned fast and didn't throw a bunch of crazy young horse problems at me.

I also had experience on green or difficult horses already even though she was my first horse that had never been backed.

If she had any issues I couldn't handle I would have sought help.

As it was we took things one step at a time and she consistently improved.

That's a big thing... knowing and being willing to admit it when you come to something you are not qualified to fix or train.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:01 AM
  #24
Yearling
I've never personally owned a horse that was broken when I got them (was given my first horse at 14) although we'd had a few in the family over the years most were young and clean slates to work with. We have no professional trainers in the family, but a handful of us have trained all the horses. In my case my grandfather, an uncle and cousin were my main guides. Everyone had learned that way. My grandfather worked with horses as a child and probably learned from his father and older family members. Some trained them to pull and others to ride. A couple were good at training for both, but I just trained for riding.
Now you wouldn't see any show training. Theses were all working horses. They plowed, pulled carts or sledges, snaked out logs, turned presses, worked cattle, took me to town to see my girlfriend , used for hunting in some cases, etc.....
Yes, you can train your own horses if you have the patience and common sense needed. Have someone who knows horses that you can go to for advice and guidence.

The problem I've had with some professional trainers I've met is they have their way of doing it and horses should be trained "their" way. Following whatever system someone taught them and they love to tell me how I should do it differently. My favorite was a lady who was shocked to find out that I didn't have a round pen and told me I needed to build a round pen to do the ground work in (we never had a round pen), but those are different stories and not important to this topic.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:06 AM
  #25
Foal
Thumbs up

I recently bought a horse that had only been handled once and in about a week or two I should b able to put a saddle on him. My friend is a trainer so she gives me tips. There is also a trainer at my barn but I don't really approve of the training methods so im in the process of getting up the courage to tell him that. But so far, my training method is going really well EXCEPT for when someone else works with him. I have a feeling he's going to b a 1 rider horse!
     
    07-22-2012, 12:31 PM
  #26
Foal
I have trained 2 of my own in the last 5-6 years, and worked for a man starting/retraining horses since I was 14, I'm 22.

Mine are mainly trail horses, but they can side/half pass, roll back, sliding stop, back up, etc. All the basic stuff. I have one mare that I have stared trick training. She knows how to bow, count, sit, lay down, shake, say yes & no, fetch, throw trash away, etc.

I also have my 2 year old TWH stallion, a 3 year old Paint gelding, and a 3 1/2 year old TWH filly I'm going to train. The filly had some prior riding, so I'm finnishing her off. The gelding has been introduced to riding, but I'm still letting him grow up some. I bred and raised the colt from my trick trained mare.

I love doing it myself. I don't have to worry about whether or not I can't do what the trainer did and I can take my time to work over things as long as the horse needs. All of my horses have a nice foundation of ground work/ manners first. BUT, I do agree it isn't for everyone. I am lucky enough to have some great horsemen as mentors who are there to help me if I need it.
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    07-22-2012, 02:30 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Years ago, yes. Still could if needed to. But it worked out well for following reasons.

My father was a Saddlebred trainer, and I learned a lot from him, and I was also around fantastic horsemen too, and soaked it up like a sponge. I read all the time about differing style of riding, training and handling, and had people that I could bounce ideas off of, or more importantly, that were doing the things I was interested in at the time.

I knew how to read horses from that exposure to horsemen/woman.

I knew when I was overhorsed.

I understood the importance conformation and attitude and "try" gives to training any horse. And I understood the difference in how the breeds react too.

I was not brought up with the attitude that "you can love a horse into being your friend and then you can train it" that I find is so prevalent now. While I read the Black Stallion and Flicka? I knew that those were stories.

The reason that people caution against training horses when you essentially know nothing about it? The horse will pay the price if you mess up. By ending up slaughter bound.

Too many problems can be nipped in the bud by an experienced horse person, whereas someone with little or no knowledge will not have the understanding to fix it, before it becomes unfixable. And that? Happens every day.

Read the posts on here, too numerous to mention, about "my horse bites" or "my horse is kicking me" or "my horse knocked me down, bolted, reared, backs up when I want to ride, horse pins ears at me and chases me out of pasture".

All of the above, and the many more I didn't even touch on? Are caused by someone not knowing how to read a horse, and worse, many times those same people are also posting that "I don't want to make my horse not like me" and "I want to gain my horse's trust, before I try to train him".

Touchy feely does not work well with horses, if at all.

Horses can hurt you. And kill you.
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    07-22-2012, 02:46 PM
  #28
Yearling
I did but under the watchful eye of my instructor that has been training and competing for 40+ years. I bought my boy at 2 wks old. Pretty much apprenticed with her for 5 years and took over all of the groundwork at the farm. Yes, it's very possible to train your own, it was the most frustrating and rewarding experience of my life(of course I picked a super smart, ornery, and slightly unwilling colt). There are a lot of positive responses on this post, but I think it really needs to be stressed that it can also be a disaster. I have seen many horses that were monsters as a result of inexperienced trainers. My problem with tv/DVD clinicians is that they never show the whole process and they always use quiet, calm horses, which we all know is not always the case. There are a thousand different ways to train a horse to do something and NONE of them will work for every single horse. There is soo much involved in properly training a horse!
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    07-22-2012, 03:12 PM
  #29
Foal
I'm still training my 4 year old. All I do is get hated on for training her. I'm also starting my 16 month old. I started sitting on Vanna when she was 18 months old and walking on her. I was 10 at the time and had some help from my mom. I started trotting her when she was almost two. After I moved barns, I did all of her training by myself. Right now, Vanna does walk, trot, canter, and is starting to learn how to barrel race. She turns with very little leg/rein, stops well, and changes gaits easily. She's not the best at backing up but she still tries by side stepping. I just moved barns again and will be doing even more work with her. I don't ride or train "traditionally" because I taught myself to ride for the most part. My mom was a trainer and taught me w/t/c on her horse. And my 16 month old, Griffin, was taught completely by me. He stands to be tacked, takes a bit. Free lounges, lead well, picks up is feet, etc. A friend of mine, who is a trainer/amazing rider, is going to see how I work with him and give me advice. She also is probably teaching me huntseat on one of her horses that she might let me get in shape. So, I'll be learning more stuff to put into Griffin.

Also, my new barn owners had a horse named Nate. He was head shy, stubborn, difficult to lead, kicked, bit, etc. I got him over being head shy completely. I found out why he acted up when being lead and found a solution and he was better. I did countless hours of groundwork and he could be lead with your pinky. He never bit or kicked me. I've walked under him, he would follow me, and listen to me better that anyone. S Nate improved a lot. He had to be given back to the rescue he came from (BO's couldn't afford him anymore) before I could get more work out of him. He had a trainer before me for over a year and the trainer got nothing out of him. I worked with him for three months and he was fantastic by time he left.
     
    07-22-2012, 05:32 PM
  #30
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine    
Years ago, yes. Still could if needed to. But it worked out well for following reasons.

My father was a Saddlebred trainer, and I learned a lot from him, and I was also around fantastic horsemen too, and soaked it up like a sponge. I read all the time about differing style of riding, training and handling, and had people that I could bounce ideas off of, or more importantly, that were doing the things I was interested in at the time.

I knew how to read horses from that exposure to horsemen/woman.

I knew when I was overhorsed.

I understood the importance conformation and attitude and "try" gives to training any horse. And I understood the difference in how the breeds react too.

I was not brought up with the attitude that "you can love a horse into being your friend and then you can train it" that I find is so prevalent now. While I read the Black Stallion and Flicka? I knew that those were stories.

The reason that people caution against training horses when you essentially know nothing about it? The horse will pay the price if you mess up. By ending up slaughter bound.

Too many problems can be nipped in the bud by an experienced horse person, whereas someone with little or no knowledge will not have the understanding to fix it, before it becomes unfixable. And that? Happens every day.

Read the posts on here, too numerous to mention, about "my horse bites" or "my horse is kicking me" or "my horse knocked me down, bolted, reared, backs up when I want to ride, horse pins ears at me and chases me out of pasture".

All of the above, and the many more I didn't even touch on? Are caused by someone not knowing how to read a horse, and worse, many times those same people are also posting that "I don't want to make my horse not like me" and "I want to gain my horse's trust, before I try to train him".

Touchy feely does not work well with horses, if at all.

Horses can hurt you. And kill you.
Exactly.

Most people are capable of working with a horse to get it do do whatever it is they want it to do. But most people don't have the patience or expertise to modify or create a behavior that is fully and permanently instilled. How many times do you read on here and elsewhere that a horse bucks. Folks, a trained horse doesn't buck...not because you have trained it not too, but because you have trained it not to want to. Those are two different things. Just because a horse doesn't buck doesn't mean it won't, and a fully and properly trained horse won't. You don't have to "catch" a properly trained horse, and it doesn't kick, bite, charge, or any other such nonsense.

Again, that doesn't mean a person is not capable of training their own horse. But in many cases behaviors are only partitially modified and as a result issues will pop up months or years later.

One other thing to note - just because a "professional" trainer trains your horse, it doesn't mean it is properly trained. Slome trainers are just plain lousy trainers that don't know what they are doing. Others are handicapped by an owner's limited budget and have to take training shortcuts to save time, and don't take enough time or take the proper steps to train a horse properly - just enough to get it to (at the moment) do what it is supposed to do. Proper training takes a lot of time and a lot of patience. Professional trainers should be given sufficient time to do their job right and not be rushed into taking shortcuts...
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