horse genetics- what do you think of my website?
 
 

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horse genetics- what do you think of my website?

This is a discussion on horse genetics- what do you think of my website? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What would you get if yoy bred a chestnut overo with a black overo
  • What does roan mean in horse talk

 
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    07-03-2010, 04:18 PM
  #1
Green Broke
horse genetics- what do you think of my website?

http://horse-colours.yolasite.com/

I have been working on it for a while, it isnt finished but I thought it had enought info on it to share
     
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    07-03-2010, 04:23 PM
  #2
Weanling
Ohhh that's a really nice website. I can't wait to see it all finished. (: Good job!
     
    07-03-2010, 04:29 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Thank you :)
     
    07-03-2010, 06:02 PM
  #4
Yearling
I really like it! It's easy to understand, and the pictures are very helpful. I have a few suggestions for you though.
-Make a seperate link for base colors.
-Change your home page paragraph. It's hard to understand.
-All the italics make it hard [for me, at least] to read.
-Instead of 'gallery', make it something like 'Color Combos', 'Exotic Mixes', etc.

Everything else looks good. I'm pretty much clueless on genetics, so I couldn't tell you if your facts are correct, but everything else seems good! :)
     
    07-03-2010, 06:12 PM
  #5
Green Broke
* Black horses can definitely produce chestnut horses - if a black horse is carrying both the red gene and the black gene, it will display physically as black but CAN produce red foals (if s/he has the red gene). It's a chestnut horse that cannot produce a black horse - if bred to a chestnut or any variation of chestnut, the foal will always have a chestnut base.

* The dorsel stripe does not distinguish a dun from a buckskin - buckskins can easily have dorsel stripes if counter shading is present. Often the zebra striping is a giveaway, but counter shading CAN also cause that, so there is no tried and true way to distinguish a buckskin from a dun unless you know the parents or have blood testing done.

* I would work on your Pinto colors page. The picture of the tobiano is actually a tovero (the face is a giveaway that one of the overo genes is also present), and tovero is a bad term - overo only means that the horse is sabino, splashed white or frame overo, and the picture you have labelled as "overo" is actually a frame overo horse, so I would remove the overo and clarify to your readers the differences between tobiano and the three overos.

* The manchado picture with the Pinto photos is misleading - manchado is not a Pinto gene, it is a rare color condition only found in Argentina horses and is widely believed to be a situation of environmental effects and not an actual color at all as it has appeared on horses that do NOT carry pinto or appaloosa.

Not a bad website at all, but I would definitely try and involve more info. You did pretty good for the base colors, but once it got more complicated, you opted to just post photos and provide little explanation which is usually what people are looking for - WHY is a horse this color, what breeds are this color, etc.

Best of luck!
     
    07-03-2010, 07:31 PM
  #6
Started
Did you get permission to use those photos?

I am a horse color genetic lover/obsessor, so don't think I"m being mean or anything, but going to point out incorrect things.

Aside from the above post,

Homozygous champagnes look NO different than heterozygous champagnes. The bottom right on that page is incorrect.

Pearl is visible in it's homozygous state, not JUST with a cream gene.

The bottom right on dun: homozygous dun does nothing different than heterozygous dun.

White horses do not usually have blue eyes. White horses are either Max Sabino (Sb1) or Dominant White (DW) and neither cause blue eyes. (and of course homozygous for LWO which COULD have blue eyes but they don't live long at all). You CAN get a white horse with blue eyes, if that horse also has splash or frame (LWO).

I do not think your sabino example is sabino at all, looks splash to me.

DW gene does NOT cause spotted patterns. Lp with a PATN does.

True roans never roan out as they age. You can't always see the roan until their foal shed.
     
    07-03-2010, 08:24 PM
  #7
Yearling
GREAT idea, I definitely will be using this site! :)
Hopefully our members (as they have already generously done) can help you fix little mistakes/help you add to it.
     
    07-04-2010, 03:28 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by horseluver2435    
I really like it! It's easy to understand, and the pictures are very helpful. I have a few suggestions for you though.
-Make a seperate link for base colors.
-Change your home page paragraph. It's hard to understand.
-All the italics make it hard [for me, at least] to read.
-Instead of 'gallery', make it something like 'Color Combos', 'Exotic Mixes', etc.

Everything else looks good. I'm pretty much clueless on genetics, so I couldn't tell you if your facts are correct, but everything else seems good! :)
funny I changed it from colour combos to gallery... don't know why ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
* Black horses can definitely produce chestnut horses - if a black horse is carrying both the red gene and the black gene, it will display physically as black but CAN produce red foals (if s/he has the red gene). It's a chestnut horse that cannot produce a black horse - if bred to a chestnut or any variation of chestnut, the foal will always have a chestnut base.

* The dorsel stripe does not distinguish a dun from a buckskin - buckskins can easily have dorsel stripes if counter shading is present. Often the zebra striping is a giveaway, but counter shading CAN also cause that, so there is no tried and true way to distinguish a buckskin from a dun unless you know the parents or have blood testing done.

* I would work on your Pinto colors page. The picture of the tobiano is actually a tovero (the face is a giveaway that one of the overo genes is also present), and tovero is a bad term - overo only means that the horse is sabino, splashed white or frame overo, and the picture you have labelled as "overo" is actually a frame overo horse, so I would remove the overo and clarify to your readers the differences between tobiano and the three overos.

* The manchado picture with the Pinto photos is misleading - manchado is not a Pinto gene, it is a rare color condition only found in Argentina horses and is widely believed to be a situation of environmental effects and not an actual color at all as it has appeared on horses that do NOT carry pinto or appaloosa.

Not a bad website at all, but I would definitely try and involve more info. You did pretty good for the base colors, but once it got more complicated, you opted to just post photos and provide little explanation which is usually what people are looking for - WHY is a horse this color, what breeds are this color, etc.

Best of luck!
Manchado- ill put that somewhere else then and explain what it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CheyAut    
Did you get permission to use those photos?

I am a horse color genetic lover/obsessor, so don't think I"m being mean or anything, but going to point out incorrect things.

Aside from the above post,

Homozygous champagnes look NO different than heterozygous champagnes. The bottom right on that page is incorrect.

Pearl is visible in it's homozygous state, not JUST with a cream gene.

The bottom right on dun: homozygous dun does nothing different than heterozygous dun.

White horses do not usually have blue eyes. White horses are either Max Sabino (Sb1) or Dominant White (DW) and neither cause blue eyes. (and of course homozygous for LWO which COULD have blue eyes but they don't live long at all). You CAN get a white horse with blue eyes, if that horse also has splash or frame (LWO).

I do not think your sabino example is sabino at all, looks splash to me.

DW gene does NOT cause spotted patterns. Lp with a PATN does.

True roans never roan out as they age. You can't always see the roan until their foal shed.
yes id did,

Ill change the dun thing and the 'sabino' is sabino. He is a dna tested sabino tb

I didnt say that true roans roaned out as they age, I mentioned that they were roan from birth but I did say that some horses roan as they age...
http://horse-colours.yolasite.com/roan.php

Thanks guys
     
    07-04-2010, 04:00 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Thanks for the info, I have made changes
Need to work on appies though
     
    07-04-2010, 12:48 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by speedy da fish    
the 'sabino' is sabino. He is a dna tested sabino tb
There is only one sabino test (Sb1) and TBs do NOT have Sb1 so that is false ;)
     

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