horse nutrition/supplements and general health
 
 

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horse nutrition/supplements and general health

This is a discussion on horse nutrition/supplements and general health within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    11-23-2013, 10:34 PM
  #1
Foal
horse nutrition/supplements and general health

I would like to have a discussion about feed.

Besides hay what do you give your horse? And what things have you heard of people giving?

I am all ears...
     
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    11-23-2013, 10:42 PM
  #2
Started
I feed a mix of beet pulp and an 11% protein 10% fat mix to most, and Triple Crown Senior to a couple. I feed grass hay to most, and alfalfa to 1.

I have fed evrything from simple to complicated(adding supplements, oil, flax, etc., etc.), and this is the most effective program for the amount of work. My horses have been everything from breeding mares to dying old animals, from National shows to pasture ornaments. They all get the same thing!!

Nancy
     
    11-23-2013, 10:46 PM
  #3
Foal
Has anyone used the supplement bee pollen? I use it for my show dogs with great results.

I also have coconut oil but im not sure if a horse can have that? I don't want to make my horse sick.
     
    11-24-2013, 09:01 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Horse nutrition requirements are totally dependent on several things. In our opinion, there is no 'one size fits all'. The main things that determine what a horse needs for maximum quality of condition, health, efficiency and cost savings are:

1) Age of horse. Young growing horses need more protein and fewer carbs. Older horses need a different feeding program to stay in good condition and stay healthy.

2) Poor keepers. Poor doers need a LOT more feed and higher quality feed than easy keepers.

3) Really easy keepers. Really easy keepers may need something that is very low calorie but still has the Vitamins or ??? That are missing from their hay.

4) Amount and kind of work being done. Obviously a horse in hard training or being ridden many miles every day needs more feed. One can feed for a very high blood count and can want a horse to be 'hot' and have a lot of energy and speed or one can want horse to 'laid back' quiet and more lazy. You feed the two very differently.

5) Kind and quality of forage available. Every feeding program has to be built around what hay or forage is available. You need to feed a horse very differently if mature grass hay is being fed free choice as opposed to bright green, high protein grass hay or alfalfa or other legume hay that is much higher in protein and other nutrients.

6) 'Condition' the horse needs to be kept in. If one is trying to condition a horse for showing or for a big sale, appearance and condition is extremely important. A saddle horse that needs to be healthy but can carry a little 'hay belly' and is going to have a natural hair coat (long in the winter and sun-bleached in the summer) can also do very well on a different diet than a show horse needs.

6) Dietary and metabolic restrictions. If you happen to have a horse with metabolic problems like a horse with Cushings or previous Laminitis, EPSM, HYPP or even allergies or any other feed related problem, you have to build your feeding program around those needs and restrictions.

7) Breeding horses. Pregnant mares and breeding stallions have different nutrition requirement. Most foals born with weak and crooked legs were carried by mares that lacked adequate nutrition even though they might have been 'fat' and looked OK.

So, in order to feed a horse for optimum condition and health without breaking the bank requires a lot more information.
     
    11-24-2013, 09:33 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Cherie said it perfectly: It completely depends on the horse and what they're being used for.

My horsie gets alfalfa, "golden year" (which is a type of senior). He is also on a daily wormer, and two supplements to keep him happy and healthy in his older years.
     
    11-24-2013, 11:25 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zexious    
Cherie said it perfectly: It completely depends on the horse and what they're being used for.
Definitely well said.

I would also add that if you live in areas that have significant seasonal changes, that that is also something that needs to be factored in... When we lived in Wisconsin, forage was adjusted as we approached Winter and then again as we came into more moderate temps.

We now live in Florida here is our 'routine' for our easy keeper (who now has a BCS of 5 according to our vet) that gets ridden 4-5 days per week not exceeding 5 hours in a week and that is mostly walking with a bit of trotting:
  • 2 acres of pasture of mostly Bahaia grass and some centipede. Then during the cooler months, Winter Rye is grown.
  • Sand Clear 1 week per month.
  • ADM MoorMan's GroStrong free choice.
  • Cosequin ASU (maintenance level).
  • Farrier's Formula Double Strength (loading dose).
  • 1/5 C Safe Choice two times per day as a 'carrier' for the ASU and Sand Clear.
  • SmartBug-Off Pellets for the really buggy seasons.
     
    11-24-2013, 11:59 AM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdblevin    
Definitely well said.

I would also add that if you live in areas that have significant seasonal changes, that that is also something that needs to be factored in... When we lived in Wisconsin, forage was adjusted as we approached Winter and then again as we came into more moderate temps.


We now live in Florida here is our 'routine' for our easy keeper (who now has a BCS of 5 according to our vet) that gets ridden 4-5 days per week not exceeding 5 hours in a week and that is mostly walking with a bit of trotting:
  • 2 acres of pasture of mostly Bahaia grass and some centipede. Then during the cooler months, Winter Rye is grown.
  • Sand Clear 1 week per month.
  • ADM MoorMan's GroStrong free choice.
  • Cosequin ASU (maintenance level).
  • Farrier's Formula Double Strength (loading dose).
  • 1/5 C Safe Choice two times per day as a 'carrier' for the ASU and Sand Clear.
  • SmartBug-Off Pellets for the really buggy seasons.
Oops, I forgot to include:
  • ~ 15 pounds of Coastal hay per day.
     
    11-24-2013, 09:59 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
Horse nutrition requirements are totally dependent on several things. In our opinion, there is no 'one size fits all'. The main things that determine what a horse needs for maximum quality of condition, health, efficiency and cost savings are:

1) Age of horse. Young growing horses need more protein and fewer carbs. Older horses need a different feeding program to stay in good condition and stay healthy.

2) Poor keepers. Poor doers need a LOT more feed and higher quality feed than easy keepers.

3) Really easy keepers. Really easy keepers may need something that is very low calorie but still has the Vitamins or ??? That are missing from their hay.

4) Amount and kind of work being done. Obviously a horse in hard training or being ridden many miles every day needs more feed. One can feed for a very high blood count and can want a horse to be 'hot' and have a lot of energy and speed or one can want horse to 'laid back' quiet and more lazy. You feed the two very differently.

5) Kind and quality of forage available. Every feeding program has to be built around what hay or forage is available. You need to feed a horse very differently if mature grass hay is being fed free choice as opposed to bright green, high protein grass hay or alfalfa or other legume hay that is much higher in protein and other nutrients.

6) 'Condition' the horse needs to be kept in. If one is trying to condition a horse for showing or for a big sale, appearance and condition is extremely important. A saddle horse that needs to be healthy but can carry a little 'hay belly' and is going to have a natural hair coat (long in the winter and sun-bleached in the summer) can also do very well on a different diet than a show horse needs.

6) Dietary and metabolic restrictions. If you happen to have a horse with metabolic problems like a horse with Cushings or previous Laminitis, EPSM, HYPP or even allergies or any other feed related problem, you have to build your feeding program around those needs and restrictions.

7) Breeding horses. Pregnant mares and breeding stallions have different nutrition requirement. Most foals born with weak and crooked legs were carried by mares that lacked adequate nutrition even though they might have been 'fat' and looked OK.

So, in order to feed a horse for optimum condition and health without breaking the bank requires a lot more information.

Well here it goes.

I live in canada, its very cold here right now. I live on the outer city so its not easy to get high quality hay.

The hay I feed is a alfalfa/berm/orchard grass mix.

Our pasture has some grass still but if we get a heavy snow fall it isnt accessible to the horse.

I have a 3 1/2 yr old Clydesdale. Ridden a hand full of times a month, now that its freezing cold probably not as much.
She gets 2/3 of a bale a day and eats half, in 24 hrs most of it is gone. And a salt block she enjoys.

She is turned out into the pasture it has a very large shelter in it.

A weanling QH I just got yesterday he eats the other 1/3 of the bale and is on "frisky foal" pellets... I made him a nice "grewl" yesterday (frisky foal, 1 hand full of rolled oats, colostrum, chopped pear, warm water) I gave it to him he sniffed it and looked at me like I was crazy and continued eating his hay.

He is inside the barn and I take him for walks to work on his halter training/getting him used to sounds, cars driving past the field ect. (which is going very well)
     
    11-24-2013, 10:38 PM
  #9
Teen Forum Moderator
When I had my mini mare she was getting:
1/4 lb Enrich 32 2x daily (ration balancer)
1 lb alfalfa pellets 2x daily
8 lbs of jiggs costal hay daily in a slow feeder net.

My TB filly (who I just sold today) is 2 years old and a hard keeper due to growth, so she got a more complicated, fat-rich diet:
7 lbs alfalfa pellets
3 oz Sho Glo supplement
2 1/2 lbs Safe Choice Special Care
1 1/2 lb Rice Bran
~20 lbs mid-quality costal grass hay.
     
    11-24-2013, 11:14 PM
  #10
Started
How much is do your bales of hay weigh?
     

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