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Horse scared of African Americans?

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  • My horse doesnt like men
  • The horse cussed my dog out

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    03-10-2012, 01:09 AM
  #11
Trained
I thought they could see red, blue, green, greys, black and white?
     
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    03-10-2012, 01:33 AM
  #12
Green Broke
I never had a horse respond differently based on a person's race, but ours definitely respond differently around children and men.
My one mare hasn't been around a lot of small children, and she gets a little nervous around them. I assuming its probably because of the way little kids move.
My sister's mare hasn't really been handled by anybody except for women, and she doesn't really care for men. We think that is because of pheromones or something.
     
    03-10-2012, 01:44 AM
  #13
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by flytobecat    
My sister's mare hasn't really been handled by anybody except for women, and she doesn't really care for men. We think that is because of pheromones or something.
My gelding doesn't like most men, either. He loves my BO, but that's only because my BO raised him from the time he was a weanling until I bought him last May. He tolerates my farrier, but that's because I make him. Lol Most other men, he'll bolt from if he's in turnout or he'll stay on the other side of his stall from them and watch them like a hawk. He's never been abused by men.

My friend and I (and our trainer) have discussed this at length, and we've come up with the theory that it's because men and women approach horses differently. Men are very business-like and "get it done" with horses, whereas women are softer and want to "make friends," as it were. Also, women are more likely to come bearing treats than men are.

I will say this, though. My coming 3yo LOVES kids. Doesn't matter their age or gender, he loves them and wants to be near them. He's actually left off having me pet him before to go stand next to this little girl who was the size of his head (she was maybe four) and wait patiently for her to pet him with his head right down next to her. Soooo wish I would have had my camera!
Eolith likes this.
     
    03-10-2012, 03:00 AM
  #14
Started
I once believed my horse, Major, was afraid of men. I began to notice that he does not dislike all men, but most. I also realized that even though he likes most women right from the git go, there are a couple of exceptions. I now believe that it is not because of the sex of a person, but it is how they approach and deal with him.

I now believe it is because men are more aggressive, where as women tend to be more passive. I'm not sure I'm even using the right words here. I am in no way trying to be offensive, nor am I talking about horsemanship skills here. I am talking about our natural body language.
iridehorses likes this.
     
    03-10-2012, 03:56 AM
  #15
Banned
There's a host of reasons why the horse could have changed behaviour!
RoosHuman and Shropshirerosie like this.
     
    03-10-2012, 06:13 AM
  #16
Started
I have always found this: "my horse doesn't like men or women or children concept" hard to understand. I am positive that horses make decisions about humans they feel ill at ease with or conversly at ease with, based on factors which we humans do not yet fully understand.

Horses do not see as we humans do, neither do we test a horse to check the quality of its vision.
Horse smell more definitively then we humans do, so they will pick up on smells or odours which we humans have no idea of.
Horses watch and record in memory the repetitive body language which we humans display as we walk or approach a horse.
Horses are very sensitive to touch and just as some humans are wary of getting too close to a horse - so are horse wary of getting too close to strangers.
And then there is voice; the volume and pitch of a human's voice gives clues to horses as to the nature of the individual. Horses react negatively to loud, sharp, fractious, voices.

Then we humans must not try to transfer to a horse our own prejudices about humans which a horse most certainly will not understand.

Any owner of a dog of one of the more protective breeds will tell you that there is a way to approach an animal. A stranger can approach my Rottweiler without hesitation, so long as he first says 'hello' to the dog and allows the dog to sniff him. But there can be neither nervousness nor forwardness in the approach. If we have a deliveryman come to the door and ring the bell then my dog will rush to the hall whilst barking. I'll hold his collar and open the door. Then I'll assess the visitor for myself and mostly I will ask them to say 'Hello' to the dog in an acceptabe manner. Then I let go of the dog who will edge over and will gently say hello to the stranger.

It is the same with horses. There is a way for a strange human to approach and there are ways which will cause anxiety even hostility in a horse.

Yesterday whilst up in the woods a lovely Welsh cob came into view ridden by a young woman followed by a big labrador wearing a dog mask. I called out and said 'hello'. I waited a second or two, I let my dog go and we walked over steadily, dog at heel, to the horse box. I stopped a couple of yards from the horse and then I said 'hello' to it. The woman asked if I would hold the reins whilst she dismounted. The horse stood still, I gave him a stroke and apologised for not having a treat in the pocket of my coat, which probably smelt of mare.
Within a few minutes the five of us, two humans, two dogs and a horse were having a pow wow. We stood, heads to heads, and talked for half an hour whilst the horse was prepared for the journey back home. None of us had met the other before.

The mask fitted to the rider's dog gave a clue that maybe it was aggressive but I could see from its body language that it was not and the rider explained that the dog might otherwise pick up and carry branches which disturbed the horse.

At the time I was wearing a bright blue hand knitted bobble hat, which is very warm and cosy when plonked on my bald head on cold mornings. I must have looked a right twerp. But the horse didn't care. I must have smelt and sounded friendly.

It is rare I hold back from horses, but when I do it is because I can see that my proximity might be unwelcome. In such instances it is usually the rider who is anxious about my interest, not the horse.
Ladytrails and attackships like this.
     
    03-10-2012, 07:01 AM
  #17
Started
An incident in The Square

When I still had Joe , my wild woolly cob, we used to ride across to one of the local towns which had a square in the centre. In the square was a pub with a small area laid out with tables and chairs where customers could sit in the sun and gossip. We used to visit and I would tie Joe up to a convenent lamp post whiilst I partook of a glass of red. I would sit opposite from where Joe was tethered and I could see him all the time - except for when I went into the pub to collect my glass of wine.
On one occasion as I came out from the bar , I looked over to check on Joe and there was my Joe surrounded by a coven of ladies of the village, each leading a youngster - some even so young as to be ferried along in a push chair. Two very young children were actually stroking Joe. I was terrified. I dare not call out, I dare not rush over. I dare not show signs of panic. But the proximity of 8 young children to my 650 kile cob was an accident waiting to happen.

I quickly walked over and when I got close enough for a low pitched voice to be heard I said: "Ladies, Ladies, please move the children back and away from the horse, Please, NOW." Luckily for me (and Joe) they saw me in my riding breeches and boots and they did as I had asked. There was no incident. My cussed horse Joe had stood and allowed these strange, squeaking kids to stroke him. He had barely moved. What a boy.

When I got close up, I stood between him and the loving mothers and I allowed them, one by one, to approach and stroke his nose. I also gave them a very polite and kind lecture about why never to approach a strange horse when tethered.

I think those few minutes of anxiety in life caused me to lose several pounds of weight. But I had learned my lesson. I decided it was too dangerous to take him to that village again and sadly we never went again.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Joe @Magor.jpg (61.7 KB, 210 views)
     
    03-10-2012, 07:07 AM
  #18
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
When I still had Joe , my wild woolly cob, we used to ride across to one of the local towns which had a square in the centre. In the square was a pub with a small area laid out with tables and chairs where customers could sit in the sun and gossip. We used to visit and I would tie Joe up to a convenent lamp post whiilst I partook of a glass of red. I would sit opposite from where Joe was tethered and I could see him all the time - except for when I went into the pub to collect my glass of wine.
On one occasion as I came out from the bar , I looked over to check on Joe and there was my Joe surrounded by a coven of ladies of the village, each leading a youngster - some even so young as to be ferried along in a push chair. Two very young children were actually stroking Joe. I was terrified. I dare not call out, I dare not rush over. I dare not show signs of panic. But the proximity of 8 young children to my 650 kile cob was an accident waiting to happen.

I quickly walked over and when I got close enough for a low pitched voice to be heard I said: "Ladies, Ladies, please move the children back and away from the horse, Please, NOW." Luckily for me (and Joe) they saw me in my riding breeches and boots and they did as I had asked. There was no incident. My cussed horse Joe had stood and allowed these strange, squeaking kids to stroke him. He had barely moved. What a boy.

When I got close up, I stood between him and the loving mothers and I allowed them, one by one, to approach and stroke his nose. I also gave them a very polite and kind lecture about why never to approach a strange horse when tethered.

I think those few minutes of anxiety in life caused me to lose several pounds of weight. But I had learned my lesson. I decided it was too dangerous to take him to that village again and sadly we never went again.
What a gob-smacking and weird story. I can't begin to imagine what was in your mind. Leaving a horse unattended, tied to a lamp-post by it's reins and standing on the public pavement and with access to the road while you go drink alcohol!

Seems common sense isn't so common!
     
    03-10-2012, 07:38 AM
  #19
Weanling
Erm, actually I don't think the op is 'race obsessed' or whatever... Its absurd that making a distinction between race causes everyone to be appauled in todays society. We have to be so careful not to say something slightly wrong because we get labled so quickly

It is perfectly possibe a horse could be tense around a person with a different skin colour to what he is used to because horses do associate colours, sounds and smells with bad experiences. A horse could react the same way to a white guy if he was used to black handlers. My dog doesn't like people with grey hair. No reason why she should have this fear, she just does. Does this make me ageist?

Its most likely the horse had a bad experience with a coloured man, or someone wearing the same jacket/hat/shampoo.
     
    03-10-2012, 07:55 AM
  #20
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by OwnedByAlli    
erm, actually I don't think the op is 'race obsessed' or whatever... Its absurd that making a distinction between race causes everyone to be appauled in todays society. We have to be so careful not to say something slightly wrong because we get labled so quickly.
Rightly so in my opinion. I for one will always challenge when someone says something racist. Even if its just 'slight'

Note:

The op's user name
The flawed story
The presumptions re ethnicity
The stereotypes
The leap to conclusion which is not fact-based- indeed it's absurd based on what's told
Previous posting history
     

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