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Horse scared of African Americans?

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        03-10-2012, 10:51 AM
      #31
    Banned
    You're right. I form conclusions on the basis of facts, knowledge and information.
         
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        03-10-2012, 10:53 AM
      #32
    Showing
    *MODERATOR NOTE*

    Disagreement is fine and welcome. Please refrain from taking it to a personal level and digs at other members.
    GreySorrel likes this.
         
        03-10-2012, 10:58 AM
      #33
    Green Broke
    Theres a horse at the barn like this.....he is a great horse, anyone can ride him type of horse, but he's knows what his job is, and that's Barrel Racing. My friend takes him all over the place competing and what not, and she says she doesnt have any issues with him until an African American is around. She says that her horse tries to kick, bite, paw, and generally act aggressive towards one if he sees one....
         
        03-10-2012, 10:58 AM
      #34
    Banned
    I'm not sure why everyone here is getting so jumpy on this subject :l I've met animals that don't like white people, I've met animals that don't like "black people (And sorry if this isn't too PC as to not offend anyone.) and I've met animals who didn't like men or women. I'm sure they all had their different reasons, everyone smells different, genders smell different and different races have different smells (more likely than not); and scent is a very powerful memory tool.

    I personally had a dog that STRONGLY disliked black people (I say that because I do not know if they were African Americans, Cuban, or whatnot.), but that was because our neighbors (who were black) would harass him day to day to the point that I could not leave him outside without him snarling at the fence line. Most lovable dog with anyone else.

    That said, as a white girl when I moved into a Latino community for a few years, a few of their animals were very wary of me... well I was the only one like me there! So I didn't blame them.

    Animals are sensitive to change, and they have strong memories about things that hurt them. Like I said before, the sense of smell is a very powerful memory tool, more so for our lovable companions. I do not believe it is far fetched at all for an animal to judge someone by their smell, they do it with each other all the time.

    My two-cents here :)
         
        03-10-2012, 11:37 AM
      #35
    Trained
    When I was a kid, my Dad was stationed in Alabama for 1.5 years. Selma, 1966. My Mom had grown up very poor, but she talked Dad into hiring a maid to come one morning a week.

    The first day she arrived, our dog went nuts. My Mom was embarrassed, and explained that she guessed he hadn't been around many blacks. The black woman smiled and replied, "That's OK, my dog does the same thing when whites show up!"

    Side note: It turned out that my Mom couldn't stand the thought of someone seeing her house dirty. The day before the maid would arrive, she would scrub the house spotless. When the maid arrived, there was nothing for her to clean - so they sat at the kitchen table, drank coffee and talked for 4 hours. From my Dad's perspective, one way or the other, the house was scrubbed once a week...
    Tianimalz and Ladytrails like this.
         
        03-10-2012, 11:55 AM
      #36
    Trained
    My buckskin has a problem w people of a "different color", always has. I had a Kelpie that was otherwise always quiet, rarely ever barked, minded his own biz....but when it came to blacks - he went nuts! If one walked by the truck and he were in the cab....the reaction was like something out of a steven king movie! I think it is b/c they never came into contact w them and they both perciev(ed) "different" as a "mega threat".
         
        03-10-2012, 02:00 PM
      #37
    Trained
    Horses are perceptive, period.
    My gelding has a STRONG aversion to men, especially portly ones and heavy people in general. He was being coyboyed/ridden by a 280lb. Or probably more man when I got him, Rick is only 14.2hh, stocky but more an athletic pony. My vet is a very large strong man and Rick can't stand him, my farrier is a short stocky guy and still I have to stand there and tickle his lips to get him to stand still. If ANY man comes into the pasture he runs to the other side acting like a bronc blowing and rolling. My MIL is... lets just say larger at 6' and well larger. Rick runs from her.
    He also dislikes hunting orange, can't seem to get it figured out. I put a couple old vests out in the pasture and after a few months he still refuses to graze near them, the other two have no problem. IDK, but they see what they see and act how they feel so it's possible a different looking person will trigger a reaction. So if a person with bright orange hair came out my sweet docile gelding would turn into a beast in 10 seconds flat.
         
        03-10-2012, 02:50 PM
      #38
    Trained
    I found this on what colors horses see.....

    Unlike humans, which have three different types of retinal cells (blue, green and red cone photoreceptors) to detect color, horses have only two (a blue cone photoreceptor and a second photoreceptor that is most sensitive to light and is roughly between that of the human red and green cone). The horse also has fewer numbers of color detecting photoreceptors than do humans, and they are arranged differently in the retina than are human cone photoreceptors. Humans with normal color vision typically see four basic unique hues--blue, green, yellow and red--and about 100 intermediate colors that can be thought of as varying blends of pairs of the four unique colors (for example yellow-green, reddish-yellow/orange, reddish-blue/violet) and so forth). The most dramatic impact of having two cone types instead of three is that horses (and some “color-blind” humans) have only two unique hues, believed to be something similar to blue and yellow, and there are no intermediate hues. When colors at the far ends of the spectrum of visible light are mixed, the result is either a white/gray (this occurs in the blue-green range of the color spectrum), or a desaturated version of one of the two basic hues (e.g. A pastel yellow or a pastel blue). In a sense, horses are orange-blue “color-blind” in that although they can see objects with these colors, they cannot differentiate between orange and blue solely on the basis of color since they both appear to be gray-white to the horse. The fact that horses also have many fewer cones in the central retina than humans do also suggests that their perception of color may not be as vivid as that of humans and that colors appear as washed-out pastels or sepia.


    I also had a horse that didn't seem to like men, he would refuse to load in the trailer if a man was standing behind or holding the door. If my mom or my girl friends was back there holding the door he would hop in..no problem. Same horse would kick the crap out of my the male shoers that come do his feet, I went through several because of it. I finally had a female come shoe him....he fell asleep...lol...and I used him for my shoing final for a little college course I took on shoeing.

    I also had a Hancock colt that I started that would blow up if got down low around him, like bending over to pick something off the ground or trying to pick up his feet. I only had about 20 rides on him and hauled him up to the rodeo grounds to ride him. The drill team was having practice and I unloaded my colt, tied him to the trailerand waited for them to finish. I was watching them practice and turned around to see a toddler underneath the colt with her arms wrapped around his front leg!!! He just stood there like a champ....

    Point is you just never know what a horse will and wont react to....lol....sometimes I think they do it just to mess with us, tee he...
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        03-10-2012, 03:02 PM
      #39
    Trained
    My mare prefers men. She doesn't dislike women, but she prefers men. The farrier is a big guy. When he arrives, she walks up to him and lifts a foot with an expression that says, "Can I get sparkles this time?" She never gets them, tho...
         
        03-10-2012, 03:20 PM
      #40
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by arrowsaway    
    why do some of you keep saying "colored"? It's the 21st century, how about we use terms that are a bit more educated and a bit less...jim crow?
    Oh, and for the record. Animals do not see race. That is a human shortcoming that some choose to pin onto their animals in an attempt to further justfy their own prejudics.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    LOL Lots of black people use that term! Heck, it's even on shampoo bottles.. for "Women of Color".
    Face it, every term out there is going to be considered offensive to somebody. Technically using the term "African American" is inappropriate as well because many Blacks aren't of (recent) African decent!

    Technically speaking we're all from Africa!
    Susan Crumrine likes this.
         

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