Horse talk for mature people over 40 - Page 21
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Horse talk for mature people over 40

This is a discussion on Horse talk for mature people over 40 within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Powered by vBulletin mature women pics
  • Pictures of weman that ride horses over 40

Like Tree51426Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-12-2012, 06:12 PM
  #201
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden    
Mature riders over 40 - well I suppose I am one such person, but in truth the title doesn't really describe me correctly - so herewith an old photo of me misbehaving in my youth.

The Rosen Kavalier is me - dressed to seduce. The horse a poor mutt called Silver - who taught me to appreciate
Riding Western.



.
Barry that is quite a picture
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-12-2012, 06:12 PM
  #202
Yearling
Haven't been on forum for a while but what a gem of a thread this one is! Thank you, Country Woman, for the great idea!

I am 56 and got into riding with my daughter about 4 years ago. Took lessons with her. She started lessons at age 13 and didn't want to be in classes with little kids so we did lessons together with an instructor. I have always been into outdoor activities such as hiking, camping, backpacking, and athletic since high school, so riding appealed to me on several levels. I had seen people camping and trail riding in the wilderness and thought that it would be great to share the outdoors with a horse.

Anyway... daughter lost interest and I kept up with lessons, but once a week wasn't enough horse for me. Began doing trail rides on rented horses but that was expensive. Leased a horse, then found my mare Nessie in the same herd. I had been watching her for a while, and remembered the first day I ever laid eyes on her. I was in awe of her. Leased her for several months then bought her. She was a cutting horse, then brood mare. Her last baby is being trained at my barn now for cutting.

Leasing was great, I could ride everyday. Was fairly expensive so prepared me for cost of ownership. Funny, I remember back then while leasing my mare, asking a woman who boarded at the barn (who has now become one of my horsey friends) "Just what exactly is this "horse" thing??? I can't get enough of it!" She laughed and said, "Well, it is an expensive hobby". Another man I met while riding back in the leasing days told me that one day I would find a horse that I would love stronger than I have ever loved anyone or anything. And he was an old crusty guy, too. I think that for me it is the working relationship with the animal that is that "love" bond. I have gotten my mare back into shape, and want to always have something new to do together. I am looking into lessons again now, to perfect some skills such as rollbacks and starting off with a trot/lope, and then want to do team penning and sorting just for fun. There is an arena just about a mile away that is a major headquarters for penning and sorting, but finding the buddies to practice with is of course always the challenge. We no longer have cows at my boarding barn, either.

When I pay off the bills, hopefully by end of summer, for my daughter's care [don't ask :( ] I will then buy a used truck and small trailer to haul to trails. Now my riding friends and I share trucks & trailers!

So many of your stories on this thread brought tears to my eyes, with accounts of hardships, moves, losses. For whoever it was that began the "You know you are maturing when... " list (forgive me, don't remember!) I just want to add: You know you are maturing when you don't take anything for granted, and are grateful for the simple, beautiful moments in everyday life. I have had my share of heartaches, and lately with above-mentioned daughter, but spend every evening watching the sun set over an old barn in a pasture that has been home to my mare for over 10 years, as my 11 month-old colt munches on his grain and my mare, tied close by, watches me in anticipation of another evening of riding together. I've got mud on my boots, my hands are dirty, am usually alone, but I have never been happier!

Will try to find pic to post when I get home.
     
    02-12-2012, 06:16 PM
  #203
Trained
[quote=ThursdayNext;1355816]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Country Woman    

I just soak my stuff in water when it gets too grubby and give it a good scrub, then let it dry in the air. I have a horse-hair (natural) brush that I clean with a little bit of baby shampoo. Most of it's just water, though. I use my grooming bucket as a pail - this kills 2 birds, 1 stone...
thanks thurssaynext
Also what should I clean mt bit and bridle with?
Also a wintec saddle ?
     
    02-12-2012, 06:21 PM
  #204
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by outnabout    
Haven't been on forum for a while but what a gem of a thread this one is! Thank you, Country Woman, for the great idea!

I am 56 and got into riding with my daughter about 4 years ago. Took lessons with her. She started lessons at age 13 and didn't want to be in classes with little kids so we did lessons together with an instructor. I have always been into outdoor activities such as hiking, camping, backpacking, and athletic since high school, so riding appealed to me on several levels. I had seen people camping and trail riding in the wilderness and thought that it would be great to share the outdoors with a horse.

Anyway... daughter lost interest and I kept up with lessons, but once a week wasn't enough horse for me. Began doing trail rides on rented horses but that was expensive. Leased a horse, then found my mare Nessie in the same herd. I had been watching her for a while, and remembered the first day I ever laid eyes on her. I was in awe of her. Leased her for several months then bought her. She was a cutting horse, then brood mare. Her last baby is being trained at my barn now for cutting.

Leasing was great, I could ride everyday. Was fairly expensive so prepared me for cost of ownership. Funny, I remember back then while leasing my mare, asking a woman who boarded at the barn (who has now become one of my horsey friends) "Just what exactly is this "horse" thing??? I can't get enough of it!" She laughed and said, "Well, it is an expensive hobby". Another man I met while riding back in the leasing days told me that one day I would find a horse that I would love stronger than I have ever loved anyone or anything. And he was an old crusty guy, too. I think that for me it is the working relationship with the animal that is that "love" bond. I have gotten my mare back into shape, and want to always have something new to do together. I am looking into lessons again now, to perfect some skills such as rollbacks and starting off with a trot/lope, and then want to do team penning and sorting just for fun. There is an arena just about a mile away that is a major headquarters for penning and sorting, but finding the buddies to practice with is of course always the challenge. We no longer have cows at my boarding barn, either.

When I pay off the bills, hopefully by end of summer, for my daughter's care [don't ask :( ] I will then buy a used truck and small trailer to haul to trails. Now my riding friends and I share trucks & trailers!

So many of your stories on this thread brought tears to my eyes, with accounts of hardships, moves, losses. For whoever it was that began the "You know you are maturing when... " list (forgive me, don't remember!) I just want to add: You know you are maturing when you don't take anything for granted, and are grateful for the simple, beautiful moments in everyday life. I have had my share of heartaches, and lately with above-mentioned daughter, but spend every evening watching the sun set over an old barn in a pasture that has been home to my mare for over 10 years, as my 11 month-old colt munches on his grain and my mare, tied close by, watches me in anticipation of another evening of riding together. I've got mud on my boots, my hands are dirty, am usually alone, but I have never been happier!

Will try to find pic to post when I get home.
I love your story this inspiring to me not to give up on my
Dream
You are welcome outanobout
I love hearing all these stories
Northernstar likes this.
     
    02-12-2012, 06:35 PM
  #205
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThursdayNext    
I believe that some barns do this, but it's not a good idea - it can promote the spread of skin infections. None of the barns I've been associated with have permitted this practice because of the risk for disease.
Meh......It can't be that big of a deal when it's 3 for 3 around here. And these aren't places where there's only $500 horses.
     
    02-12-2012, 08:13 PM
  #206
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by outnabout    
I just want to add: You know you are maturing when you don't take anything for granted, and are grateful for the simple, beautiful moments in everyday life. I have had my share of heartaches, and lately with above-mentioned daughter, but spend every evening watching the sun set over an old barn in a pasture that has been home to my mare for over 10 years, as my 11 month-old colt munches on his grain and my mare, tied close by, watches me in anticipation of another evening of riding together. I've got mud on my boots, my hands are dirty, am usually alone, but I have never been happier!

Will try to find pic to post when I get home.
Nicely said

Even if we did "take the time to smell the roses" in our youth, the fragrance has a much deeper meaning in our "Senior Youth"
Ladytrails, cmarie and Eagle Child like this.
     
    02-12-2012, 10:04 PM
  #207
Yearling
[quote=Country Woman;1355959]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThursdayNext    
also what should I clean mt bit and bridle with?
Also a wintec saddle ?
Bit should get thoroughly scrubbed off with water and a sponge as soon as you take it out of the horse's mouth. Our bit-washing station at the barn has a little Listerine in the wash water. If you do this as soon as you take the bridle off, you won't have to scrub off dried saliva or bits of hay (which turn to concrete when they dry) and you won't forget to wash the bit either.

People can get strong feelings about what you use to clean the leather tack with, but most of the Wintec saddles I've encountered are synthetic, so they would need different stuff. For my leather, I have a thing of leather-cleaning wipes. Very convenient, very easy to use. I use those to wipe off the leather tack whenever it looks grimy (bridle) or dusty (saddle). And then I use a leather conditioner (again, people have very strong feelings about this too) on it all when it's feeling a bit dry, or I haven't done it in a long time (like a couple of months) or before I store the gear for the winter.

A lot of people in my barn use Lexol products.

I use the leather cleaning wipes and then follow up with Rudy's Tack and Saddle Conditioner from Bee Natural. The people at my local tack shop swore by it, and it seems to be working pretty well so far.

My trainer uses a bar of glycerine saddle soap that she wipes a damp cloth on, and then uses the cloth to wipe down her tack - she says this cleans and conditions it all at the same time.

The Wintec will probably want something different - I should think their website would discuss this, as easy-cleaning is one of the big advantages of the synthetic leather saddles.
     
    02-13-2012, 12:04 AM
  #208
Trained
Thanks for the advice ThursdayNext
     
    02-13-2012, 09:32 AM
  #209
Started
Northern Star, Every year there used to be held in a very very expensive Surrey village a carnival parade. The idea was that all of the societies active in or around the village would enter and parade through the centre of the village.

We had a Western riding club, owned and operated by an old Canadian cowboy named Kenny Ross, who had come over from Western Canada to fight Hitler and who somehow never went back home when the war was over. Kennie was always dressed in a bent battered old cowboy hat, jeans and a pair of western boots. He was bowlegged and buckled, wrinkled and sun burned but he loved his horses. He was an original natural horseman, when the term had not been invented.
The Western club was very informal. We'd met up at Kenny's place, saddle up the horses and ride off over the surrounding forests which at that time were a military training area - for parachutists of all things. But the riding was magnificent. There were three pubs on a circular route around the forest and we'd call in at all three.

One year we Western riders all went in fancy dress - I was the Rosen Kavalier - dressed in blue.

Happy Days.
Ladytrails and Northernstar like this.
     
    02-13-2012, 11:13 AM
  #210
Trained
Hi Barry it always nice to hear what;s happening over the pond where you are
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0