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Horse talk for mature people over 40

This is a discussion on Horse talk for mature people over 40 within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        02-01-2013, 02:23 AM
      #6891
    Weanling
    With horses we have the opportunity to share a good part of our lives with them. Two long lived horses are almost a human life span. With dogs their time with us is too short.

    Stan: I have got the smartest horse in the world. I use one of those polyethylene sleds to fill with manure when I clean when there is ice. Beats the heck out of a wheel barrow. Well, our Standardbred, Bart grabs the rope in his mouth and pulls it around behind me as I fill it. I swear it's true. Not only that but his paddock is an ice skating rink with ice several inches thick. That horse is so smart that he scatters his hay around on top of the ice so I won't slip and fall when I clean. At first I thought he just threw his grassy alfalfa around to thresh the alfalfa leaves out of it. Now I am positive he is being considerate which is extraordinary in itself, considering he is a horse. I am positive he does it on purpose like throwing cinders on a road. He is one smart fella.

    Seriously, he always gets in the way so bad I can hardly clean, wanting me to rub his forehead and blow in his nose and he always plays with the sled biting the edge and licking it. Well, today he picked up the pull rope in his mouth and got it caught over his lower jaw the way they sometimes do when you take the bridle off. The sled was quite heavy with manure and he kind of panicked and threw his head up in the air and the front of the sled came up with it. I thought for sure he was going to sling manure all over the paddock. I was considering running for my life just as the rope came loose.

    It is true that where he has tossed the hay around on the ice and broke it up with his hooves the ice is not a bit slippery. I built a feeder where a grate slides up and down on top of his flake of hay and I started putting it in that again. It takes almost all day for him to eat the flake but he is a slow eater anyway. He goes on a hunger strike when he gets to the stemy stuff. The main reason I made it was so that he wouldn't pick up sand from eating off the ground. I made one for Trampus too but he walks around and eats his own flark off the ground. I guess you could say he is an easy keeper and a cheap horse to feed. But I have to tell you, when I see him doing that it turns my stomach and I have to look away. That's another reason I am going to sell him. It's enough to puke a maggot.
    AlexS likes this.
         
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        02-01-2013, 02:46 AM
      #6892
    Weanling
    Hugs Xena.
         
        02-01-2013, 08:42 AM
      #6893
    Trained
    Stan, you are wise to be cautious about those flarking hoons.

    (Did I use the terms correctly?)
    Stan and Prairie Rose like this.
         
        02-01-2013, 02:58 PM
      #6894
    Trained
    Thinking all of you
         
        02-01-2013, 06:48 PM
      #6895
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eliduc    
    With horses we have the opportunity to share a good part of our lives with them. Two long lived horses are almost a human life span. With dogs their time with us is too short.

    Stan: I have got the smartest horse in the world. I use one of those polyethylene sleds to fill with manure when I clean when there is ice. Beats the heck out of a wheel barrow. Well, our Standardbred, Bart grabs the rope in his mouth and pulls it around behind me as I fill it. I swear it's true. Not only that but his paddock is an ice skating rink with ice several inches thick. That horse is so smart that he scatters his hay around on top of the ice so I won't slip and fall when I clean. At first I thought he just threw his grassy alfalfa around to thresh the alfalfa leaves out of it. Now I am positive he is being considerate which is extraordinary in itself, considering he is a horse. I am positive he does it on purpose like throwing cinders on a road. He is one smart fella.

    Seriously, he always gets in the way so bad I can hardly clean, wanting me to rub his forehead and blow in his nose and he always plays with the sled biting the edge and licking it. Well, today he picked up the pull rope in his mouth and got it caught over his lower jaw the way they sometimes do when you take the bridle off. The sled was quite heavy with manure and he kind of panicked and threw his head up in the air and the front of the sled came up with it. I thought for sure he was going to sling manure all over the paddock. I was considering running for my life just as the rope came loose.

    It is true that where he has tossed the hay around on the ice and broke it up with his hooves the ice is not a bit slippery. I built a feeder where a grate slides up and down on top of his flake of hay and I started putting it in that again. It takes almost all day for him to eat the flake but he is a slow eater anyway. He goes on a hunger strike when he gets to the stemy stuff. The main reason I made it was so that he wouldn't pick up sand from eating off the ground. I made one for Trampus too but he walks around and eats his own flark off the ground. I guess you could say he is an easy keeper and a cheap horse to feed. But I have to tell you, when I see him doing that it turns my stomach and I have to look away. That's another reason I am going to sell him. It's enough to puke a maggot.

    So now we have a horse that picks up its dishes after it. So far he has done this 5 times in a row. He first moves it around and checks it out to make sure he has got all the food then will lift the bucket to about 4 to 5 feet off the ground where I take it and he will release once I have a good hold. So why not pull the sled around while you pick up the left overs. And why not spread hay around so he does not slip or so you do not slip.
    As for Trampus, my third boxer dog was called trampus. He only ate meat or what ever he could steel off of the plate.

    I remember the second boxer dog I had. I was around 18, not so long ago. My step father cooked a roast Lamb, and put his secret ingredient in the gravey. Being a young man of 18 I spent a lot of time on the phone trying to convince some girl I was worth going out with and a good time would be had.

    This particular evening I was on the phone to a young lady I was very interested in, and was so engrossed with the sales pitch I was spewing out, (**** neer believed it myself) my stepfathers best roast lamb and gravey with the secret ingredient beside me and in come Taj. Taj was not one of those racey boxers one sees nowdays.

    He was like a big bull mastive. Up to my dinner he went and before I could react grabbed a mouthfull of my roast dinner. Meat, Veg and the secret reciped gravey. In it went and out it came. He spat it out onto the plate looked at me with a questioning look in his eye, then walked away. Needles to say I did not bother trying what was left. I went hungry that night declining my stepfathers offer of the left overs. I also struck out on the phone. (ouch)

    I learnt never to take that dog with me when trying to impress.
    I had another occasion with that **** dog, I managed to get a girl friend who loved my dog, While sitting on the couch watching some TV, Taj, walked in and pushed his way onto the couch and placed himself between me and the object of my affection. Picture, sitting on the couch, young lady, Large dog, then me no longer with my arm on her shoulder playing with her hair, all watching TV. I go to move my arm back around the dog to continue with the seduction, the dog turned to me looked me straight in the eye and growled. Well the girl burst out laughing, the dog just sat there looking at me. I decided to make a coffee.

    So it is not impossible in my opinion for an animal to display smarts in excess of what we give them credit for.

    What has this got to do with horse. Not a lot. But imagine sitting on the couch and the horse decides to sit beside you and no camera. Who would believe it.

    One question eliduc, how does the horse that gets in the way take to being ridden. Any issues on who is the boss.
         
        02-01-2013, 07:24 PM
      #6896
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celeste    
    Stan, you are wise to be cautious about those flarking hoons.

    (Did I use the terms correctly?)
    Yes you did. You must have some kiwi blood some where in the family tree.
    Celeste likes this.
         
        02-01-2013, 07:26 PM
      #6897
    Started
    Bwahaha great story Stan!!
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        02-01-2013, 07:32 PM
      #6898
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Critter sitter    
    Bwahaha great story Stan!!
    Posted via Mobile Device
    The trouble is its true, **** dog
         
        02-01-2013, 10:07 PM
      #6899
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Stan    
    The trouble is its true, **** dog
    I was a girl on the other side of a couch just like that. It was too cute. And if the guy was mean to the dog he would have struck out with me too
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        02-01-2013, 10:10 PM
      #6900
    Yearling
    Eliduc and Stan, great horse stories. Just proves that it's important to stay smarter than the 4-legged ones!
         

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