Horse talk for mature people over 40 - Page 748
 
 

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Horse talk for mature people over 40

This is a discussion on Horse talk for mature people over 40 within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    03-10-2013, 01:19 AM
  #7471
Weanling
Vet said to hose wound clean with antiseptic, got betadine, put her back on antibiotics for another 7 days, has had one round. Continue stalling and hand walk.
The reason I qeustion it is another thread on the forum had so many people saying don't hose a wound other than initially to clean and don't be scrubbing and rubbing because it'll increase the formation of proud flesh. I'd read on here the Manuka honey was great for healing. I generally do listen to vets but I've also learned the hard way over the years that sometimes they're not always right so I try to learn all I can from all sources to decide on the best way to go.
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    03-10-2013, 01:31 AM
  #7472
Weanling
Stan, It says MGO 400, old 20+. It's from Manuka Health, in New Zealand.
The pony has been in Judy Judy Big Ears stall since this happened. If Judy found out there was a honey covered pony in her stall she'd really be ticked off at being shut out!
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    03-10-2013, 01:44 AM
  #7473
Weanling
Oobie,
Definitely don't scrub on it--correct.
I would rinse with cool water (NOT pressurized, but a light rinsing) twice a day, and treat with antiseptic.
7 to 10 days of penicillin also.

Watch for inflamation--it will be puffy for a while, but should not increase in puffiness. Don't want the wound completely closed for a while as it needs to be able to drain.

Some exercise by hand walk-in is very good also.

I don't know anything about the honey, so can't comment regarding that. Stan has the knowledge in that area.
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    03-10-2013, 01:46 AM
  #7474
Weanling
I want to add that a wound of such nature may develop some proud flesh no matter what is done, but given the location, less so than a leg wound area.
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    03-10-2013, 05:59 AM
  #7475
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by oobiedoo    
Stan, It says MGO 400, old 20+. It's from Manuka Health, in New Zealand.
The pony has been in Judy Judy Big Ears stall since this happened. If Judy found out there was a honey covered pony in her stall she'd really be ticked off at being shut out!

Sounds O/K Ill check it out for you tomorrow I need some for Stella She has taken a big chunk of flesh out of her leg. The tart.
It wont do any harm and it really does work, manuka honey is a strong natural antibiotic the 20+ is high value We have used it on our horses and toast.

Put it on and cover the wound up as it can attract insects if they are around. But again it does work.
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    03-10-2013, 11:31 AM
  #7476
Started
Ooobiedoo still am a huge fan of doc underwoods horse med...

I am going to have to research this Honey. It does sound good and I have a recipe my hubby will use if underwoods is not available

It is
Equal parts

Honey
Cod liver oil
Unseasoned meat tenderizer
And vaseline
mix and apply 2 to 3 times a day do not wrap

So there may be something
     
    03-10-2013, 11:34 AM
  #7477
Started
Well I am home in bed with a cold and its snowing out... I have 3 dogs here keeping me company... and coffee. I'll watch a movie or 3
     
    03-10-2013, 01:11 PM
  #7478
Trained
Hi all hope you have a nice day
     
    03-10-2013, 01:18 PM
  #7479
Yearling
Critter,
I would rinse with cool water, gentle stream, as the vet instructed. It will help cool off any swelling and rinse off pus and debris. Then I would put any topical antibiotics on there that the vet told you to (I'm assuming that he's having you give antibiotics by mouth, though). Then I would put the honey in a small squirt bottle (e.g. Like a honey bottle!) or an empty wormer tube with a tip, and gently apply it along the edges of the wound, letting a little drip down into the gap below the skin flap. Stan's in summer in NZ and he's right about insects. Here in the US Midwest, insects are dormant right now so I wouldn't cover unless you're dealing with flies in NC already.

Honey is a natural antibacterial, suppressing infection from bacteria. The manuka component, from NZ tea trees, has an unusual healing property as well that goes beyond what antibiotics can do.

Proud flesh can be a problem with any wound, but it's aggravated by movement (e.g. The reason for stall rest), irritation or rubbing (the reason for not scrubbing) and just slow healing in general (don't go overboard with trying ointments or other stuff as too much of a good thing can be bad). Pressure dressings can keep proud flesh under control by forcing the edges of the wound to be flatter, which helps the baby epidermis cells spread across the open wound.

You'll have 3 steps forward and 1 step backward no matter what you try, so as long as healing is headed in the right direction I'd stick with the plan.

Good luck!
     
    03-10-2013, 02:54 PM
  #7480
Started
Lady trails this is oobiedos horse not mine. But thank you :)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ladytrails    
Critter,
I would rinse with cool water, gentle stream, as the vet instructed. It will help cool off any swelling and rinse off pus and debris. Then I would put any topical antibiotics on there that the vet told you to (I'm assuming that he's having you give antibiotics by mouth, though). Then I would put the honey in a small squirt bottle (e.g. Like a honey bottle!) or an empty wormer tube with a tip, and gently apply it along the edges of the wound, letting a little drip down into the gap below the skin flap. Stan's in summer in NZ and he's right about insects. Here in the US Midwest, insects are dormant right now so I wouldn't cover unless you're dealing with flies in NC already.

Honey is a natural antibacterial, suppressing infection from bacteria. The manuka component, from NZ tea trees, has an unusual healing property as well that goes beyond what antibiotics can do.

Proud flesh can be a problem with any wound, but it's aggravated by movement (e.g. The reason for stall rest), irritation or rubbing (the reason for not scrubbing) and just slow healing in general (don't go overboard with trying ointments or other stuff as too much of a good thing can be bad). Pressure dressings can keep proud flesh under control by forcing the edges of the wound to be flatter, which helps the baby epidermis cells spread across the open wound.

You'll have 3 steps forward and 1 step backward no matter what you try, so as long as healing is headed in the right direction I'd stick with the plan.

Good luck!
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