Horses Out of Control! Please help.
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Horses Out of Control! Please help.

This is a discussion on Horses Out of Control! Please help. within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horses out of control

Like Tree11Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-01-2013, 05:23 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy Horses Out of Control! Please help.

Alright, so I have three horses that used to be boarded in a nice barn. They would be in stalls for most of the day, then be turned out, and I'd do lessons on these horses a few times a week. I was jumping one of my horses up to about 4 and a 1/2 feet! They all had great manners, and I didn't have any issues with any of them. Anyways.

Twix is a retired racehorse. She's a TB, and 9 years old. She's a wild one. Brina is a 20 year old TB, and calm. Scooter is a mixed breed gelding, 17 years old. He's the leader of our little 'herd'. The 'herd' does not have stalls. They have access to the lower part of a barn where there is a water trough, and three feed bins. They come and go inside the barn as they please and have about an acre of land to roam, which has turned into mostly weeds and mud. However, they are each fed hay and grain each day and then they have free access to the little bits of grass. I'm unhappy about this situation, but I can't move my horses anywhere else because of money issues. *My horses are currently living at my house*

My biggest issue right now is that I can hardly get a halter on Twix. She's my 'baby'. Brina and Scooter are fine. Twix, however, freaks out once I manage to trick her into putting her head down for the halter to be slid on. Once I attach a lead line, she panics and plows me over. She just runs and does not allow me to control her. She likes to take off galloping with her lead line whipping between her legs, threatening to tangle and hurt her. Today, she knocked me in the head with her head and gave me a bloody lip after I got her halter on. I'm worried that she's only going to get worse from here.

Sigh. I want to ride again. I can't even groom Twix, let alone put a saddle/bridle on her and ride. Just walking around the paddock with her would make me happy! Leading her outside of her paddock and allowing her to eat some long grass in the field would make me glad! But Twix doesn't have manners anymore. It's as if she's forgotten. Quite honestly, I'm feeling heartbroken. I don't feel like an adequate horse mommy anymore because I can't even control my girl. She doesn't respect me, and I'm beginning to fear her; obviously, she's a heck of a lot bigger and stronger than I am.

I need help. Any tips on making a horse respect you? How to get them to calm down a bit, and allow themselves to be lead around calmly? Anything.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-01-2013, 05:33 PM
  #2
Started
Huh, so did this happen overnight? Have you checked for any pain issues? Saddle issues, teeth issues, lameness issues, etc.? She may be scared that once you halter her your going to ride her and something to do with riding is causing her pain. I would rule out all possible pain issues.

Now, how long has she been on your property? Most horses need to adjust to their new home, and some may need longer than others.

If this is simply lack of respect you need to deal with this right away. I would start by going out in the pasture without a halter, and when she comes up to you simply rub your hands on her, give her a hello pat, and walk off. Do this for a few days, then go out their with a halter, and when she comes up to you say hello, pat her, rub the halter on her, possibly give her a treat and leave her. Once she starts getting comfortable with you again only then would I try to put a halter on her. Once you get it on, take it off and walk off. Act uninsterested in her. Take it step by step. Soon you can attach a lead rope, take it off, walk off. Once she is comfortable with this ask her to walk a step, then leave her be. Make a few mini sessions a day. If she wont even let you catch her, then you get a four wheeler, or simply chase her around the pasture until she's ready to stop. Make her RUN. Do NOT let her stop. If you have patience and don't give up she will eventually get tired and stop running. Soon she will be comfortable with the halter being on her, and lead training can re start ;) Im guessing this is pain related, or she is adjusting to a new home for it to happen so overnight though.
KigerQueen likes this.
     
    08-01-2013, 08:02 PM
  #3
Weanling
If that happened in a short period of time or without some kind of trauma, it sounds like a lot bigger issue than lack of respect. Has a vet seen her lately?
     
    08-01-2013, 08:08 PM
  #4
Banned
You need in person help. Things happen too quickly and you need to be able to react the right way immediately.
Can you get a trainer, or a more experienced horse person to help you?
smrobs and Speed Racer like this.
     
    08-01-2013, 08:31 PM
  #5
Trained
Get her in the round pen, put the halter and lead on, and leave her. Let her step on it and hit it a few times. She'll get over it. This is how we teach babies to respect a halter too.

After she freaks herself out and does her thing, go back in there and take off the halter and make her move her feet in the round pen. Be sure you distinctly "point" in a direction, and make her move NOW. Not two seconds from now, not a minute from now, but IMMEDIATELY get her at least trotting off, if not loping. Change directions a lot. Step in an "L" shape. Step in front of her shoulder to catch her eye, then take four or so steps back while "pointing" the other direction. This gives her room to turn into you.

Never let her turn into the fence/away from you in the round pen. Every single time make sure she turns to the inside, toward you. Turning her butt to you is a lack of respect. If she turns away from you, run in front of her again, make her change directions and CHASE her for half a lap. Then let her go for a little bit, and ask for the change again. The entire idea behind this is keeping her attention on you, and teaching her the easiest place to be is facing you. If she turns away from you, it will be a lot more work for her.

Another thing to remember when you stop is to step in front of her shoulder, and catch her eye. Let her turn and face you and just let her stand without approaching her. Then go ahead and walk towards her with the halter in your hand. If she holds still, put it on. If she tries to back/run away from you, chase her around the round pen immediately. As soon as she tries to "leave", make her leave hard and fast. She'll learn that moving her feet gives her nothing but trouble and standing still is much better.

Once the halter is on calmly, rub her with it. Throw it at the ground, over her back, around her legs, just general desensitizing. If she moves, follow her. Don't try to stop her. Don't stop moving the rope either. Just follow calmly until she stops moving and relaxes. Make her think the only time she gets to relax is when the halter is on. You could give her a treat too if you wanted but at this stage I wouldn't, since she's being disrespectful with her head.

From there, advanced to yielding her hindquarters and forequarters, sidepassing down the fence, backing up, flexing side to side..All basic groundwork. I guarantee your problems will solve themselves this way.
     
    08-01-2013, 08:37 PM
  #6
Trained
I think we need to know how long it has been that this little "herd" has been where they are now, and not at the nice boarding place where you were riding? I am getting the feeling that you brought them home, got busy, life got in the way, and you have done nothing with them for a while. I am guessing it would probably be months, if not a year. But, we need to know. I also would recommend you get help. If the mare has started to scare" you, you need to regain your confidence with her, and that may take another person to help you regain her respect.
Speed Racer and AlexS like this.
     
    08-01-2013, 10:30 PM
  #7
Trained
One acre is a pretty small area for three horses. They aren't getting enough exercise and this can make them crazy. If you don't have stalls to catch them in, that can make them harder to catch. You need to try to get the barn divided up so that you can enclose them and catch them. I would not even go near them without a whip in hand. If they try to run over you, give them a good whack. One lesson should straighten that out.

If you can catch the Twix, you should put her on a line and work the devil out of her. Then saddle up and ride. If this is too much, you need somebody to help you.
     
    08-02-2013, 12:22 PM
  #8
Foal
Thank you for all of your answers! In response to some questions:
The horses have been here for about two years. :( The original intention was to make the paddock larger and larger over a period of time, but of course something expensive has to break/be repaired every time we have just enough money saved up to buy some more T-posts and fencing.
No, this hasn't happened overnight. I just put up with Twix's disrespect and let her walk all over me. I'm tired of it now, though.
Her teeth have been recently floated so there's nothing wrong there.
Her saddle never caused her pain when I used to ride on a regular basis so I don't think she's afraid of it.
When she trots around the paddock, I don't notice any soreness/lameness/limping so I do not have any reason to believe moving around causes her pain,either.
Unfortunately, I do not have anybody to help me with her. No trainers, no experienced horse people. And the only resource I have to make her work right now is a paddock. I'd love to get her in a round pen and make her move until she's exhausted. However, I don't have that luxury available to me.
     
    08-02-2013, 12:24 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gallop On    
I would start by going out in the pasture without a halter, and when she comes up to you simply rub your hands on her, give her a hello pat, and walk off. Do this for a few days, then go out their with a halter, and when she comes up to you say hello, pat her, rub the halter on her, possibly give her a treat and leave her. Once she starts getting comfortable with you again only then would I try to put a halter on her. Once you get it on, take it off and walk off. Act uninsterested in her. Take it step by step. Soon you can attach a lead rope, take it off, walk off. Once she is comfortable with this ask her to walk a step, then leave her be. Make a few mini sessions a day. If she wont even let you catch her, then you get a four wheeler, or simply chase her around the pasture until she's ready to stop. Make her RUN. Do NOT let her stop. If you have patience and don't give up she will eventually get tired and stop running. Soon she will be comfortable with the halter being on her, and lead training can re start ;) Im guessing this is pain related, or she is adjusting to a new home for it to happen so overnight though.
This sounds like a good strategy... Thank you! My only worry is what if I can't get her to allow me to rub the halter on her? She has a tendency to act overly afraid of things once they're touching her body.
     
    08-02-2013, 12:31 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ootwistedoo    
This sounds like a good strategy... Thank you! My only worry is what if I can't get her to allow me to rub the halter on her? She has a tendency to act overly afraid of things once they're touching her body.
I highly suspect that the only thing she is afraid of is work. She is very likely bluffing.
     

Tags
manners issues

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Neglect in many of the horses - Animal control looks the other way Jalter Horse Health 34 05-21-2013 11:31 PM
Damage control - Horses got into the grain wild_spot Horse Health 15 11-03-2011 06:22 PM
HELP! My Horses Mane Is Out Of Control! Babysis940 Horse Grooming 24 08-18-2011 12:49 PM
gainig control of a Horses feet 5cuetrain Horse Training 3 05-21-2010 02:09 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0