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Horses Out of Control! Please help.

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        08-02-2013, 12:36 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ootwistedoo    
    No, this hasn't happened overnight. I just put up with Twix's disrespect and let her walk all over me. I'm tired of it now, though.
    So you created the monster. Not good.

    The horse knows you're afraid of her, and you've allowed her to become the alpha. This is going to take a lot more than lunging to fix, unfortunately. You're going to have to start reasserting your authority, and since you've allowed her to reign like a holy terror for the past two years don't be surprised when she objects, and quite strongly, to your trying to take back control.

    You're going to have to show that you're not afraid of her, and you can't object to using strong arm tactics with her, at least at first. She needs quite a few Come to Jesus Meetings. I sincerely hope you're up to the challenge, otherwise you're going to get badly hurt.
         
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        08-02-2013, 02:06 PM
      #12
    Trained
    OP-I can pretty much assure you that there are SOME resources somewhere in your area, unless you live on the moon. I would suggest you try and seek out help, unless you are a lot better than I at putting on your big girl panties and "manning up" repeatedly to a horse that could hurt you badly or worse. I have never been able to do that, and once I am afraid I know I have to get a pro involved or send the horse "down the road" with full disclosure. I value my life and limbs too much. No horse is worth it.
         
        08-02-2013, 02:43 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by franknbeans    
    OP-I can pretty much assure you that there are SOME resources somewhere in your area, unless you live on the moon. I would suggest you try and seek out help, unless you are a lot better than I at putting on your big girl panties and "manning up" repeatedly to a horse that could hurt you badly or worse. I have never been able to do that, and once I am afraid I know I have to get a pro involved or send the horse "down the road" with full disclosure. I value my life and limbs too much. No horse is worth it.
    I don't live on the moon, but I do live 20 minutes from the nearest small town. I don't have neighbors, large barns, or even small ones with horses nearby. I'd hire a trainer to help me if I had the money, but I don't.
         
        08-02-2013, 03:16 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    Roundpenning a TB is not a good idea. Nor is working them until the blood is really pumping. All that does is guarantee a wreck usually. Calm and patient is better.

    They react much differently to things, and are much more apt to harm themselves than many other breeds. And at her age, I would not do the rope dragging either.

    You need help there on the ground, that has experience with TB's. Trying some of the things suggested so far? Will end up with a vet call more than likely.

    Handling seems to me to be the base cause here.
         
        08-02-2013, 03:26 PM
      #15
    Trained
    This is a training issue. They are fed and comfortable and see no need to listen to you. I will give you the solution to my problem when I first bought a herd of 6 (all broken) horses in 1985, and couldn't catch any of them.
    I bought a feeding bowl for each horse. I put grain in each of the bowls OUTSIDE and not within reach over the fence of any of them. I waited to see who was interested in the grain. It wasn't the herd leader, but one horse eventually came to the gate. I got a halter w/lead on him, led him through the gate, shut the gate and tied him next to a bowl to eat. No other horses got any grain that day.
    The next day I did this and the herd leader was the first one at the gate. For many years I led my horses OUT of their turnout to be grained EVERY DAY. I demanded that each horse put his head over the gate and wait patiently to be haltered, and led each to be tied far enough away from each other to prevent a fight. All of them came out in their pecking order. I put them back in their pecking order by teaching them to walk through the gate, turn, and walk to the gate, give me their heads and calmly allow me to un-halter. This way NO HORSE kicked me. I did this for over a decade and the horses that I kept in my tiny riding academy never forgot this lesson. When I moved and they were in my backyard I could take out a halter and lead and ALL of my old horses--all now passed on--would walk up to me to be calmly haltered. I spent two winters drilling this lesson into my 7yo KMH and he does the same, all 1,450 lbs of him!
    Celeste likes this.
         
        08-02-2013, 03:46 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ootwistedoo    
    ...I'd hire a trainer to help me if I had the money, but I don't.
    Then I'd suggest selling the horse with full disclosure.

    Why?

    Because from what you describe, you could easily be put in the hospital at most any time, and the medical bill will exceed the cost of having a trainer come out to see what is going on and help you handle it. Hiring a trainer to come out twice for an hour each to see and give advice would run no more than $100 where I live. Even if it is 3 times that where you live, a hospital bill can run much more.

    You may not need 3 months of daily professional help. Depending on the situation, someone might be able to help you change things around with a single lesson. Or not. But you do need eyes on from someone good with horses, who can tell you if it is something you can fix with some advice, or if you are an emergency room trip waiting to happen. IMHO.

    I'm no horse expert. I do know that when you start being afraid of the horse, it is time to call for help - up close, personal and live.
         
        08-02-2013, 03:58 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    I think you need to get a professional involved. Things in a situation like this (particularly if you are afraid of her) have the potential to get very dangerous very quickly.

    You mentioned that you boarded at a nice barn, is that still in the area? I was under the impression you moved them home because you didn't have the money to continue boarding them there... But, perhaps there is someone at that barn that can help you?
    I don't suggest you deal with this problem on your own.
         

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