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How to deal with TBs

This is a discussion on How to deal with TBs within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        08-25-2013, 12:39 PM
      #21
    Started
    Hello to Mangomelon. I don't know whether you will read this thread after all the replies; I hope you do as you started the conversation with some very strong views.

    I can see that you have had some negative experiences with some Throroughbreds. This happens, and it is most likely to happen to someone who hasn't got sufficient experience of the breed.

    So, you have formed an initial opinion on Tb's that they are volatile and dangerous, and this has then been backed up by reading and listening to similare views. A lot of people feel like you do! But this doesn't make them right, it just makes them ill-informed. And at the end of the day it means that you are missing out on a whole wonderful slice of horse behaviour and training.

    As other people on this thread have said, TB's can be hugely rewarding and honest creatures. Once you understand them, and know how to get the best out of them, not only will your life improve, but so will theirs. And remember - they are innocent creatures in all this, dependant on YOU to keep them safe and secure.

    When a TB sees you approaching, with your heartbeat speeding up, your body language signalling aggression, and your pheromones spewing out fear...... It is going to react to all of those!! The horse will go on high alert, and thus.....the vicious circle has been completed and your fears have been justified.

    Now: the horse cannot break this cycle, it is a horse. You however are an intelligent, capable horse-handler with the capacity to LEARN and MODIFY your behaviour so that you CAN help yourself in this situation.

    From this low point of hating thoroughbreds, choose to go upwards to make it better, not downwards to reinforce the hate.
         
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        08-25-2013, 01:11 PM
      #22
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mangomelon    
    Golden Horse--I realize that my original post is a little extreme but it's my personal opinion. I'm sorry if you disagree but I don't think it's necessary for you to tell me to be ashamed of my opinion. If you have helpful advice I would appreciate it. If not, I would appreciate it if you would let me have my opinion.
    Yes your first post was extreme, and yes its your opinion. My helpful advice was hidden in my first post, treat each animal and person as an individual, not with an expectation of certain behaviours just because!

    I think also there is an important distinction here, there are TB's and there are OTTB's, both the same genetics, but with the OTTB's you are having to overcome their previous experience and training. I learned to ride on both TB's and OTTB's, and have definitely come across the good the bad and the ugly!
    Muppetgirl likes this.
         
        08-25-2013, 02:29 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Maybe if you treated a Thoroughbred like a regular horse you can handle it right...If you treat a horse like a monster, its going to act like a monster. If you treat a horse like a horse, it will act like a horse. Period.

    So basically, if you have all of these nerves and negative energy (especially pointed at TBs) you're going to be digging yourself a grave.
    Tarpan likes this.
         
        08-25-2013, 03:02 PM
      #24
    Trained
    I have rode Thoroughbreds, I love them the ones I rode were calm and easy going
    There are good and bad in all breeds of horses
         
        08-25-2013, 03:11 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    A horse is a horse. Get it out of your mind that they are TB's and just do it.

    I once heard of a girl that was watching my friend lunge her half arab. The girl asked what breed the horse was, and my friend told her. The girl proceeded to say how scared she was of arabs and that they were dangerous and blahblahblah. Less than a half hour before, she was riding a half arab that was pinto.

    I'm sure it's the same thing. You are scared of the breed name. If these people never told you these were TB's, would you be scared?
    Speed Racer likes this.
         
        08-25-2013, 03:11 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    If the horses are ill-mannered, I really feel sorry for you. Takes the joy right out of working with horses.

    I don't care what breed a horse is, it must behave when I am working with it. Sure some over-fed, underworked ones will jig around as I lead them, but they respect my space and never pull on the lead. And I can handle them whenever, and whichever part needs attention.

    Like others have said, if these are misbehaving with you, ask your boss for tips. Do they misbehave with her or their owners? I'm pretty sure you can develop whatever skills it takes to manage these. I like the part of your original post where you say you may not ever like them, but want to know how to deal with them. Works with people and horses!
         
        08-25-2013, 03:39 PM
      #27
    Teen Forum Moderator
    If you get the chance, take a look at one of the threads I have on my Thoroughbred filly Kenzie. She's quite literally been through hell, but is still the sweetest, gentlest, most forgiving young horse I've ever met. She's a total clutz and doesn't necessarily always think when she's scared, but I have yet to EVER see her purposely try to hurt me or anything else...yet IMO she has every right to because of the terrible things that have been done to her.

    Thoroughbreds are not 'coexisters' (new word) horses. If you have a fault as a handler, a TB is going to find it. Not because they're that BAD of horses, but because they're that tuned in to you. Thorougbreds crave leadership, and if you can not provide that leadership they will become the leader themselves. But once you have established yourself as a capable leader, they'll go to the ends of the earth for you. You have to EARN a TB's respect. It isn't just assumed and given to you, as with some other breeds. That is what makes them special, and that is what gives them the drive that makes them such amazing sport horses.

    On the feeding front, I have to agree that the TBs you work with are probably under exercised and over fed. I actually have an example for you. We have a chestnut TB mare named Shaniah. Already, she has three strikes against her. One, she's the infamous chestnut 'red head' of the horse world. Two, she's a thoroughbred. Three, she's a mare. And let me assure that she was a DEMON. She was off of the race track, mean as all get out, and HOT. She came to us with severe injuries from racing, so she had to be stalled for about 6 months...very limited hand walking even near the end. If you got close to her stall, she'd lunge and try to take off a chunk of your skin. If you talked to her, she's gnash her teeth and glare at you. If, heaven forbid, you tried to wrap her legs without first sedating her, she was completely ok with bashing your head in.

    But for whatever crazy reason, we kept her. She had good breeding, she was fast, and she was pretty. For 8 months we dealt with her horrific personality, and we all hated her. Just when we were at our wits ends though, a vet came to us with a possible solution. She asked us what we were feeding her. She was getting alfalfa, senior feed, beet pulp, and crimped oats; all to help keep weight on her since like many TBs, she was a hard keeper. The vet's eyes widened and she answered 'take away the candy and soda every day and she'll be a new horse.' What she meant by that, is that we were feeding her TONS of carbs and sugars to keep weight on her, but we were also feeding her extremely hot nature and driving her crazy. By this time it was okayed for us to start turning her out more, so we tossed her into a pasture, took away the senior feed, BP, and oats, and replaced it with hay and a low-sugar high-fat feed.

    I kid you not, less than two weeks later we were starting to think someone switched horses on us. Shaniah was by no means a a bomb proof kids pony, but she was no longer attacking her handlers, she was quiet when we wrapped her legs, and she was starting to prick her ears when we called her name. A decade later she's a main horse in our lesson program and she absolutely adores to be ridden, groomed, and loved on. All because we took time to realize she needed a different feeding plan and because we were able to offer her more space to run around. It wasn't her breed that made her crazy, it was the fact that she wasn't able to be a horse and yet we were pumping her up with junk we thought she had to have!
         
        08-27-2013, 11:10 PM
      #28
    Showing
    I don't know if the OP likes Clinton Anderson or not, but right now on RFDTV, he is doing a 13-week series on retraining a TB off the track. He goes over a different aspect of training a horse like a TB every week. Right now, I'm watching him round pen the TB and he's explaining how and why OTTBs (and TBs in general) act the way they do. I'm loving it so far and I think it would help the OP A LOT.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        08-29-2013, 02:14 PM
      #29
    Foal
    I think from reading all of these replies that all of the TBs I have met are just the bad ones. I've met a lot of them but they all have similar trainers, inexperienced owners (most of them) and they all get limited turn out and a lot of grain and beet pulp and all that stuff. Most of them only get worked a few days a week, too. And most of them are OTTB.
    Also, I think this is what I need to learn:

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
    ETA : if I soothed my QH like I would a TB, he'd be a nightmare! You tell a QH, you convince a TB.
    The other thing I'm going to start doing is not leading them in circles. I had a girl at the barn tell me to do that to "let them move their feet" but several people on here have recommended not doing that so I'll just let them move their feet forward from now on.

    I apologize to anyone I offended by not choosing my words more carefully. While I don't think I will ever like TBs I can learn to be respectful of people who do enjoy them.

    Thank you for your advice!
         
        08-29-2013, 04:01 PM
      #30
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mangomelon    
    I think from reading all of these replies that all of the TBs I have met are just the bad ones. I've met a lot of them but they all have similar trainers, inexperienced owners (most of them) and they all get limited turn out and a lot of grain and beet pulp and all that stuff. Most of them only get worked a few days a week, too. And most of them are OTTB.
    Also, I think this is what I need to learn:



    The other thing I'm going to start doing is not leading them in circles. I had a girl at the barn tell me to do that to "let them move their feet" but several people on here have recommended not doing that so I'll just let them move their feet forward from now on.

    I apologize to anyone I offended by not choosing my words more carefully. While I don't think I will ever like TBs I can learn to be respectful of people who do enjoy them.

    Thank you for your advice!
    What might be of help is reading a little about retraining an OTTB. Tons of stuff to be found through Google. They'll tell you a little about the lifestyle of a racehorse, the routines, the handling or the lack thereof. There are lots of simple everyday things a TB on the track never learns, simply because there's no need or no time.
    I used to work for a TB breeder many years ago and was forced to lead them with a short rope through the halter ring, doubled, and just let one end go once we arrive in pasture. They were never taught to stop, turn to face you and wait for halter off. What contributed to lots of dancing and prancing on the way. And on the track most of them being led with chain or a Chiffney bit. So there could be the reason for some bad behavior. Not the horse's fault
         

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