How to I start my horse on Jumping? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:08 PM Thread Starter
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How to I start my horse on Jumping?

Lately I have tryed getting into jumping. I have rode him English numerous times. When I lead him up to a jump (about 1'9'' or 2') he just stops or walks over it.. I give him enough room and enough momentum.He isnt scared of the pole or anything. Im just not sure what the problem is. Please help!
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post #2 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:22 PM
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ground polos and more ground poles walk trot and canter them as much as you can I'm still working my way up yo cantering them =)
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post #3 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:27 PM
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Instead of "leading him up" to a jump, why not add small trot poles to your lunge circle? Then move on to some cavelettis :)
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post #4 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:29 PM
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So far I've trained one horse to jump... I will eventually teach my mare but for right now I will tell you what I know (I'm an amateur trainer).

How is he lunging over ground poles at a walk? Trot? Canter? This is the first step. Start with one pole at a time, about 9ft apart for walk/canter and about 4ft apart for trot. Once your horse gains confidence add a pole and so on. After you have about 4 -6 poles on the ground, you can add your first jump. Start with the pole on the ground, then raise it on one end (about 6inches-1ft), if he goes over that fine then add another cross rail. Keep doing this until he gains confidence. The most I would jump for the first week of two is 2ft. Then once he builds the muscle and confidence you can slowly work your way up :) This is what I did, we eventually made it to 4 1/2 ft!

I wish you the best of luck!
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post #5 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:29 PM
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Please get the help of a trainer.

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post #6 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:43 PM
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He might be feeling you get a bit apprehensive about the jump. If you tense up at all he may think he should "worry" about it and just freeze. Also have you jumped before/taken lessons in jumping. Riding english on the flat is different than jumping. Please get the help of an experienced trainer to help train your horse and to help you learn the proper fundementals of jumping. It's not just ride up to the jump and fling the horse over it and hope for the best.

I would start him on the ground. It's a lot easier for a horse to find their balance over a jump the first good amount of times without a rider than with. IMHO.

If you have a round pen I would set up 2 poles on the ground on either side of the round pen across from each other. Send him around at each gait in both directions a few times.

Once he seems comfortable and relaxed at each gait and in each direction (not rushing, panicing, balking, etc) set up "standards" on the sides of each pole but don't raise the poles up. Then once again send him around at all gaits and in both directions.

Once he's relaxed with that raise one side of the poles about 6 inches off the ground. Never place the poles in a fence where it can get caught up if the horse hits it. It could be disasterous.

Continue through the process of raising the poles up(both sides) and add in a small cross rail(after a while of working with real small "jumps") I would stay at cross rails for quite some time before moving up to a straight vertical jump. From what I've found cross rails seem to give the horse a sense of security( I don't know why but every horse I've worked with would happily hop over a cross rail and then shy away at a 1 foot vertical) also while riding cross rails help you to guide your horse to the center of the jump. When you do move up to verticals(after quite some time) add a ground pole at the bottom of the jump to give the horse a guideline.

I wouldn't recommend trying to move up the height a lot during one session. Work at it on the ground consistantly for a few weeks or so and then go to the saddle.

When you go to the saddle start back at the ground pole and work your way up slowly. Make sure you're not catching the horse in the mouth on the landing (when you move up that high which shouldn't be for a while)

Some horses you can just take and point at a 2ft jump and they'll take it even if they know how to or not. Others need time to understand and figure out what you're asking them. So instead of just willy nilly bound over the jump like in the movies take the time to teach your horse to understand what you want.

It's also not something you can do overnight. Sure you could "force" the horse over the jump (not saying you are, just an example) but what would you be teaching the horse? At the end of every lesson the horse should be calmer(NOT tired or exhausted) than when you started IMO.

I'll say it again please get the help of an experienced trainer because it's a real trainwreck trying to teach yourself to jump while trying to teach your horse.
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post #7 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Please get the help of a trainer.
My dad trains cutting horse for a living and my sister is a very very amazing rider. Not to be rude but I have 2 trainers already that I am always around Defintally don't need another. Just needed some advise
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post #8 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantomcolt18 View Post
He might be feeling you get a bit apprehensive about the jump. If you tense up at all he may think he should "worry" about it and just freeze. Also have you jumped before/taken lessons in jumping. Riding english on the flat is different than jumping. Please get the help of an experienced trainer to help train your horse and to help you learn the proper fundementals of jumping. It's not just ride up to the jump and fling the horse over it and hope for the best.

I would start him on the ground. It's a lot easier for a horse to find their balance over a jump the first good amount of times without a rider than with. IMHO.

If you have a round pen I would set up 2 poles on the ground on either side of the round pen across from each other. Send him around at each gait in both directions a few times.

Once he seems comfortable and relaxed at each gait and in each direction (not rushing, panicing, balking, etc) set up "standards" on the sides of each pole but don't raise the poles up. Then once again send him around at all gaits and in both directions.

Once he's relaxed with that raise one side of the poles about 6 inches off the ground. Never place the poles in a fence where it can get caught up if the horse hits it. It could be disasterous.

Continue through the process of raising the poles up(both sides) and add in a small cross rail(after a while of working with real small "jumps") I would stay at cross rails for quite some time before moving up to a straight vertical jump. From what I've found cross rails seem to give the horse a sense of security( I don't know why but every horse I've worked with would happily hop over a cross rail and then shy away at a 1 foot vertical) also while riding cross rails help you to guide your horse to the center of the jump. When you do move up to verticals(after quite some time) add a ground pole at the bottom of the jump to give the horse a guideline.

I wouldn't recommend trying to move up the height a lot during one session. Work at it on the ground consistantly for a few weeks or so and then go to the saddle.

When you go to the saddle start back at the ground pole and work your way up slowly. Make sure you're not catching the horse in the mouth on the landing (when you move up that high which shouldn't be for a while)

Some horses you can just take and point at a 2ft jump and they'll take it even if they know how to or not. Others need time to understand and figure out what you're asking them. So instead of just willy nilly bound over the jump like in the movies take the time to teach your horse to understand what you want.

It's also not something you can do overnight. Sure you could "force" the horse over the jump (not saying you are, just an example) but what would you be teaching the horse? At the end of every lesson the horse should be calmer(NOT tired or exhausted) than when you started IMO.

I'll say it again please get the help of an experienced trainer because it's a real trainwreck trying to teach yourself to jump while trying to teach your horse.
what I was saying is the saddle is not what was freking him out and making him stop.My dad is a pro. Trainer and my sister jumps, she has been busy and hasnt been down at the farm for the past days.Yes I have had jumping lessons on my sisters POA. I just don't know how to train a horse to jump. Thank you for all your advise

Last edited by horseandme; 06-06-2012 at 11:51 PM.
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post #9 of 28 Old 06-06-2012, 11:55 PM
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You asked how you would start your horse with jumping. I just gave a squished version of the sequence I've used to start a horse with jumping. =)

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post #10 of 28 Old 06-07-2012, 12:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by horseandme View Post
My dad trains cutting horse for a living and my sister is a very very amazing rider. Not to be rude but I have 2 trainers already that I am always around Defintally don't need another. Just needed some advise
Well you didn't mention anything about having a trainer in your OP. Also a cutting horse trainer is much different than a jumping trainer. And an amazing rider is just that, a rider.. not a trainer.

If you want to do it the right way, then at least get some tips from someone that professionally trains horses to jump.

Jumping is dangerous if taught poorly. Not saying you will teach them poorly but I would never take that risk with my horse.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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