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how many people can feel it ?

This is a discussion on how many people can feel it ? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        08-29-2012, 07:23 AM
      #31
    Yearling
    Post

    First: EXCELLENT TOPIC!

    Second: Prior to posting much of ANYTHING, I must first go and read all of the responses following the OP's statement/question --yet I was soo excited to see this here that I jumped straight to "post response" and read NOTHING ELSE--YET.

    THIRD: I find it so VERY SAD whenever I read or watch a NH/other trainer's info, and they speak of "the horse's feet beneath you "are YOUR" FEET...MOVE them where you wish to place "YOUR" FEET...**I haven't ever felt such** :0( And believe me, it is NOT by LACK OF TRYING!! :0(

    Also when they refer to "feel your horse lift his back beneath you and feel him come into a frame, you'll literally be LIBERATED BY feeling and realizing how much less hollow his back feels beneath you..."--- Guys, I cannot feel these things at all; not even a little bit!

    Okay now I'm off to read all the others' posts and pray they hold the golden answer to why I am incapable of TRULY FEELING the horses I ride/have ridden...

    Ahh. Good thing I got all of that out FIRST or I might have exploded or SOMETHING!
         
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        08-29-2012, 10:54 AM
      #32
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Back2Horseback    
    First: EXCELLENT TOPIC!

    Second: Prior to posting much of ANYTHING, I must first go and read all of the responses following the OP's statement/question --yet I was soo excited to see this here that I jumped straight to "post response" and read NOTHING ELSE--YET.

    THIRD: I find it so VERY SAD whenever I read or watch a NH/other trainer's info, and they speak of "the horse's feet beneath you "are YOUR" FEET...MOVE them where you wish to place "YOUR" FEET...**I haven't ever felt such** :0( And believe me, it is NOT by LACK OF TRYING!! :0(

    Also when they refer to "feel your horse lift his back beneath you and feel him come into a frame, you'll literally be LIBERATED BY feeling and realizing how much less hollow his back feels beneath you..."--- Guys, I cannot feel these things at all; not even a little bit!

    Okay now I'm off to read all the others' posts and pray they hold the golden answer to why I am incapable of TRULY FEELING the horses I ride/have ridden...

    Ahh. Good thing I got all of that out FIRST or I might have exploded or SOMETHING!

    It comes with time :) I remember being able to feel little things but not knowing what to do about it. When I started working with a trainer he helped me pinpoint what I was feeling based on my body movement and my horses.

    It takes time. If you work with a trainer you could always ask for them to help you learn to feel. I started with figuring out if the horse was straight head to tail, then I learned what it felt like to move the shoulders in or out then the ribs then the hips. All from stand still positions. Eventually I workedon it from the walk then to the trot. The movemnet its subtle but once you know what you are feeling for it makes it a ton easier :)
         
        08-29-2012, 11:10 AM
      #33
    Super Moderator
    feeling

    You do have to experience the 'negative' to notice the 'positive'. Sometimes the best way to do this is to ride a horse that is either less responsive or more responsive to your - depends on how well your horse works for you
    You then know if you are already doing a great job or if you need to work harder
    Do beware of what I call 'Trainer hype' though. I was watching someone having a lesson some years ago and the trainer was giving her all these instructions and comments and then suddenly says
    'Thats it, goooood, gooooood, you've got it'
    And the rider nodded happily, thinking her cash was well spent
    That horse did not improve one tiny bit, the rider wasn't feeling anything at all she was just believing what she wanted to hear.
    kait18 likes this.
         
        08-29-2012, 11:43 AM
      #34
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stevenson    
    a good way to learn how to feel your horse, is simple.. start bareback. Learn your horses strides etc , then get in the saddle. I find it harder to find the stride on new horses, now that I am older and have a few injuries, and some numbness in my legs, and have found my self off balance , it is easy to critizice someone else, and hard to give helpful advice . I have seen many trail riders in perfect balance, even those that could not afford lessons.
    This.. I ride bareback a good bit of the time and it really helps you really feel the movement of your horse..Not only is it good for your balance and seat, you really have to sit your horse and feel the flow. You can really tell where it's body placement is and your learn your horse's body movements.. This is why a good bit of trainers will lead line their students.. If possible I like to be in an arena and just trot, lope, and a slow gallop with my eyes closed to feel my horse's strides and body placement.
    kait18 likes this.
         
        08-29-2012, 12:05 PM
      #35
    Weanling
    I've only been riding a few years so being honest am still focused on myself more than the horse...
    I can't feel where their hooves are...it would be useful to know that though
    I'll have a go when I ride tomorrow (:
    kait18 likes this.
         
        08-29-2012, 01:14 PM
      #36
    Foal
    At my stables they only let you ride bareback at pony camp (which I can't afford), and I've never been on the lunge line
         
        08-29-2012, 04:04 PM
      #37
    Yearling
    Quote:
    First let me say I agree with everyone above, and the next thing is ...I'm not surprised how many times do you see people that are completely off balance and finally I can't take it anymore and tell them"uuhh your crooked,off balance" and they always say"oh am I?" and I just think how do you NOT feel that!
    I used to be one of those people. That was back when I went to horse camp once a year, and that was it. I had absolutely no feel. None. Being off balance was what I was used to, and so it felt right to me. I didn't notice that I was practically on the side of the horse.

    I can clearly remember when I first started taking lessons on an every-other-week basis. My instructor told me I was balanced correctly, and I remember thinking about how WEIRD it felt. There was this little voice in my head saying "this feels wrong".

    My next instructor would tell me every time I got off balance. This helped tremendously. Suddenly, I started to tell when I was off balance, and be able to correct myself.

    Personally, I think that time is what it takes. Lots of time in practice in the saddle, preferably on a consistent basis.

    I also think that you need to be able to get to know a horse at least somewhat. Up until I started riding at the barn I'm at now, I was put on a different horse nearly every week. When you're doing that, it's hard to develop a feel, as going from one horse to another often feels very different.

    Now that I lease, I can tell so much more about the horse I ride- Skippy. I can tell when he's nervous, excited, lazy, feisty, listening to me or somewhere else entirely- and more. I can tell if he's on the wrong lead, and I'm slowly getting to be able to tell if he's on the right diagonal or not.

    But, I'm not at the point where I can move his hooves exactly where I want them. Nor do I want to be. Skippy is a relatively old horse, and most of the time, he knows what he's doing. There are times where I get nervous, but put my trust in him, and he's never failed me. Lately, I've found he doesn't spook as automatically as he used to- it's hard to explain, but it's as if he's saying, "Okay, now you take care of me. Should I be scared?"
    kait18 likes this.
         
        08-29-2012, 05:09 PM
      #38
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cinder    
    I used to be one of those people. That was back when I went to horse camp once a year, and that was it. I had absolutely no feel. None. Being off balance was what I was used to, and so it felt right to me. I didn't notice that I was practically on the side of the horse.

    I can clearly remember when I first started taking lessons on an every-other-week basis. My instructor told me I was balanced correctly, and I remember thinking about how WEIRD it felt. There was this little voice in my head saying "this feels wrong".

    My next instructor would tell me every time I got off balance. This helped tremendously. Suddenly, I started to tell when I was off balance, and be able to correct myself.

    Personally, I think that time is what it takes. Lots of time in practice in the saddle, preferably on a consistent basis.

    I also think that you need to be able to get to know a horse at least somewhat. Up until I started riding at the barn I'm at now, I was put on a different horse nearly every week. When you're doing that, it's hard to develop a feel, as going from one horse to another often feels very different.

    Now that I lease, I can tell so much more about the horse I ride- Skippy. I can tell when he's nervous, excited, lazy, feisty, listening to me or somewhere else entirely- and more. I can tell if he's on the wrong lead, and I'm slowly getting to be able to tell if he's on the right diagonal or not.

    But, I'm not at the point where I can move his hooves exactly where I want them. Nor do I want to be. Skippy is a relatively old horse, and most of the time, he knows what he's doing. There are times where I get nervous, but put my trust in him, and he's never failed me. Lately, I've found he doesn't spook as automatically as he used to- it's hard to explain, but it's as if he's saying, "Okay, now you take care of me. Should I be scared?"
    I have seen people lower or raise a stirrup because they felt they were uneven yet all they time it was because they were actually sitting to one side and had just got used to being like it
    Horses that spook because they lack confidence in themselves will often stop doing it altogether when they feel safe and secure with a particular rider
    Cinder likes this.
         

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