How many of these Safety Tips can you check off?
 
 

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How many of these Safety Tips can you check off?

This is a discussion on How many of these Safety Tips can you check off? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        02-16-2009, 08:56 PM
      #1
    Banned
    How many of these Safety Tips can you check off?

    How many of these practices are on your own safety list?

    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding.

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards.

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding.

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending.

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection.

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. This particular practice has saved my life. I had a bad fall a few years ago and as the horse was getting up it kicked me on the side of the head, knocking me out. I had swallowed my tongue and if I had not had help there, I would have died.
         
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        02-16-2009, 09:40 PM
      #2
    Trained
    How many of these practices are on your own safety list?

    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding. -- basically; I make sure I always have heels and clothes that move, but I buy them at Zellers, not at Greenhawk!

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards. -- Sometimes. I actually went out a bought one last summer so I'm getting there. But I do always have my cell phone

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector. -- not applicable, but definitely good advice. I've said it to a friend who lost confidence and had an unpredictable horse.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding. -- I think so!

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending. -- nope... if it breaks on the trail, I fix it on the trail!

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection. -- I don't agree with this. Yes for jumping, but not for all exercise and for turn-out only in unique situations.

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. This particular practice has saved my life. I had a bad fall a few years ago and as the horse was getting up it kicked me on the side of the head, knocking me out. I had swallowed my tongue and if I had not had help there, I would have died. -- doesn't apply, but I agree. BTW, it's impossible to swallow your tongue.
         
        02-16-2009, 09:59 PM
      #3
    Trained
    1. There have been a few times where I have worn sneakers.. usually when I didnt think I was going to ride but wound up riding.

    2. I always do.

    3. I have a body protector and only use it when necessary.

    4. I'm getting there. Once I get my new saddle I know i'll be set.

    5. I've never had anything break yet *knocks on wood*

    6. I rarely put leg protection on, unless I'm jumping.

    7. When I jump I will.
         
        02-17-2009, 03:10 AM
      #4
    Showing
    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding. Yes. I always wear breeches and tall boots and a helmet.


    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards. 98% of the time. With my OTTB, always. With my little QH mare I owned, most of the time. If I'm having pictures taken and feel a helmet is not necessary, I don't wear it.

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector. If I feel the need, yes I wear one.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding. Yes.

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending. -- I check over my tack subconsciously every time I saddle up. If something doesn't look right, it doesn't get put on.

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection. Ugh. I always use boots when riding. Always. I do not turn out in them... mainly because my horse lives outside... HOWEVER... boots would have probably prevented both his injuries... I also always recommend them for jumping or any activity that isn't light riding.

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. When I'm jumping, yes. Otherwise, no... I like to have someone else there with me though.
    I DO tell someone when I'm leaving for the barn and when to expect me back, and to come and find me if I'm late.
    I DO carry my phone on me at all times... albeit on vibrate.


    Woohoo I'm a safe rider.
         
        02-19-2009, 05:53 AM
      #5
    Yearling
    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding.
    I 90% of the time ride in jodphurs and a helmet... I don't ride in sneakers, however I do ride in gumboots when I don't wear jodphur boots.

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards.

    Always.

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector.

    I don't own a body protector, it's hard to find one in my size in a price range that suits... but I don't ride horses I don't trust, and I don't jump so I feel that yes I could be more protected, but choose not to wear one.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding.

    Always.

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending.

    If something doesn't look right, I don't use it.

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection.

    My horses live out 24-7 so it would be ridiculous to have boots on them all the time, it would do more harm than help! I use boots for anything more than light hacking.

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong.

    I tend to ride with someone around most days... and I don't jump so don't have to worry bout that.
    x
         
        02-19-2009, 06:24 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    LOL! I can check 2!!

    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding. I usually do but if its too hot I wear cooler pants, too cold I wear warmer pants and I usually wear boots but occassionally I go bare foot lol

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards. Yes I ALWAYS wear a helmet no matter what im doing! Never know what will happen!!!! It might even just be stupid and simple and you might just slip off or something, you never know!

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector. I don't even own one and I've never worn one and I've never even thought about getting one.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding. I make sure its comfortable for me and my horse. I have an ap saddle and I mainly only do trail riding. So yes

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending. I hardly ever clean my tack or check it! I have bailing twine with me all the time in case something breaks. Lol!

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection. my horses have never worn leg protectors

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. This particular practice has saved my life. I had a bad fall a few years ago and as the horse was getting up it kicked me on the side of the head, knocking me out. I had swallowed my tongue and if I had not had help there, I would have died. Im by my self pretty much all the time no matter what im doing
         
        02-20-2009, 11:19 AM
      #7
    Foal
    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding. hardly ever

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards. never have

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector. never have

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding. yes

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending. occasionally

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection. my horses stay out everyday so no

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. This particular practice has saved my life. I had a bad fall a few years ago and as the horse was getting up it kicked me on the side of the head, knocking me out. I had swallowed my tongue and if I had not had help there, I would have died. i do not jump and sometimes my parents are gone and none is here if something were to happen
         
        02-20-2009, 12:36 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding.
    Negative. I always have a helmet and boots, but sometimes I couldn't be bothered with breeches

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards.
    Yes.

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector.
    No. I can't stand them whatsoever and find that they restrict my movement too much

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding.
    Yes, I'm getting really anal about saddle fit and bridles ;)

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending.
    I'm getting better at checking and cleaning my tack!

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection.
    Yup! He always has his boots on when I ride him

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong.
    Yes. Or at least someone in the barn that knows I am jumping!
         
        02-20-2009, 10:25 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    1. Always wear clothes and boots that are designed for riding. Yes

    2. ALWAYS wear a riding helmet that fits you correctly and complies with current standards. Yes

    3. If you are young, your horse is misbehaving, you are out of practice or you have lost your confidence, wear a body protector. I will wear mine if needed. So far, I only have used it whe competing xc and breaking Nudge in.

    4. Make sure your tack is suitable for the job, comfortable for you and your horse, and gives you enough security for your level and type of riding. Yes

    5. Tack, particularly girths and stirrup leathers, are under strain, so always check that your tack is in good working order. Opt for good quality leather work and check the stitching EVERY time you clean your tack. Put suspect leather work aside and take it to a saddler for checking and mending. Yeah

    6. Horses should always have leg protection during exercise and, for excitable horses, during turn-out. I prefer to use open fronted boots while jumping, as they encourage a horse to be careful, whilst still offering protection. Yes except trail riding.

    7. Regardless of your level or ability, always have someone else present with you while you are jumping. This person doesn't have to be knowledgeable about horses, but someone who can assist you or summon help should something go wrong. This particular practice has saved my life. I had a bad fall a few years ago and as the horse was getting up it kicked me on the side of the head, knocking me out. I had swallowed my tongue and if I had not had help there, I would have died. I don't have anyone who would do that for me. I hardly jump anyway cos its a strain on clo bear, if I do it is never higher than 60cm.
         
        02-20-2009, 11:32 PM
      #10
    Showing
    More rules

    I can that gladly I follow all of those. As far as jumping goes, we can only jump when a trainer is there which means during lessons.

    There are a few things I would like to add to the safety list;

    1)When leading a horse you always stand to the horse shoulder on the left side.

    2)When tying a horse you always do the proper knot

    3)You never leave your horse unattended even if it is for a minutes while you go to you tack box to grab some tack.

    4)You hold the lead rope properly when leading, not wrapped around your hand.
         

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