How will my gelding do in a field by himself, but in sight of other horses?
 
 

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How will my gelding do in a field by himself, but in sight of other horses?

This is a discussion on How will my gelding do in a field by himself, but in sight of other horses? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Can a gelding and mare co habitate
  • Field gelding of a horse

 
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    04-13-2012, 10:20 AM
  #1
Yearling
How will my gelding do in a field by himself, but in sight of other horses?

Jack has been in a field with other horses since he was born and except for a few month stint at another facility they've all been the same horses. I am getting ready to move him and he will be in a field by himself but within a hundred yards or so of other horses. He is also very very attached to a mare where he's at right now. I am concerned about how he will cope with all of the changes. He'll be right behind the house when I move him so I'll be able to spend lots of time with him, but that's not exactly the same. I don't really have the cash on hand right now to buy his pasture buddy due to moving and building a fence though I can support another, but I might be able to work out some sort of payment plan with her owner. Opinions on how he'll adjust would be great! Thanks:)
     
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    04-13-2012, 10:30 AM
  #2
Weanling
I think it depends on the horse. We have our horse alone because the neighbors sold their horse and she hasn't reacted in the least. The neighbor horses used to hang out at the fence near our mare and she didn't care one way or the other, she is not at all herd bound. If your horse doesn't cope well you might consider getting a goat which is less expensive to have than a horse and still good company. It's worth considering. Good luck!
     
    04-13-2012, 10:33 AM
  #3
Started
Some(few in my experience) are fine alone. Most horses find it very hard to cope. They are herd animals, when the herd takes a nap, one horse stands gaurd. With out the herd protection alot of horses are very insecure.
     
    04-13-2012, 10:41 AM
  #4
Started
He'll have trouble since he's the clingy type. He'll do alot of walking the fence and hollering the first few days. He will quite down with time. He probably will eat very little because he's upset but don't worry about that. He'll get hungry enough to stop and eat normally in a few days. Make sure your fences will hold him or he will end up with the neighbor's horses. Not a good way to start off with the neighbors.

Instead of buying a 2nd horse, try to find someone with a retired pasture puff who is looking for a place to keep him. Ask at the feed store or put up an ad. Make them pay for their own feed plus $XX to cover the expenses of time, water, pasture maintenance, fencing... Trade for fencing, shed building, house/horse sitting... Try to find another gelding. He will be less apt to be joined at the hip with a gelding than a mare. There are also free horses everywhere looking for good homes. Many will be usable, sound horses. Check to see if there are any local horse rescues that you could house one of their horses on a temporary basis. You can always pick up a yearling for less than $100.
     
    04-13-2012, 10:48 AM
  #5
Yearling
Thanks for the input!

NewHorseMom, I would definitely put a goat in with him but he does NOT like goats, is pretty aggressive with them actually.

Left Hand , Jack is a pretty dominant boy, in the past he hasn't been extremely friendly with youngsters he's been in with. Do you think it would make a difference that it would just be the two of them?
     
    04-13-2012, 10:58 AM
  #6
Started
The dynamics will change with the mix of horses. Was he aggressive with younger horses when they were added to an established herd or when it was just the two of them? Was he schooling the youngster or being downright mean? Being unfriendly and grabbing them by the neck are completely different.

If he starts out by himself, he might quickly figure out that biggest PIA yearling or goat is better than nothing. Goats need great fencing!!!
     
    04-13-2012, 11:02 AM
  #7
Started
Things will change when he's by himself. We have a gelding that's a big jerk with every new horse, but we watch carefully and in a few hours they are one of the herd. Personally, I'm not a fan of goats. We have some on the farm and they escape from everything, eat anything and are generally pains.
     
    04-13-2012, 11:07 AM
  #8
Weanling
On my drive to work everyday I pass fields of horses. I feel like I know them. One day I noticed one of the people sold all but one of their horses. That horse was left alone in the field but the people on both sides had horses. This horse went nuts. The path he wore next to the fence line was deep. He lost weight because he refused to graze away from the fence. They eventually sold him and I was thankful as he was dying of loneliness.
     
    04-13-2012, 11:17 AM
  #9
Started
All you can do is try and find out to see how your horse will react. They are all different. Some are okay with it, some aren't. Some horses are okay with being turned out by themselves, but if you take horses out of their field and then they're by themselves, they act up.

I would keep your horses's halter on and a bucket of grain close by for the first time just in case you need to catch him.
     
    04-13-2012, 11:17 AM
  #10
Yearling
This is what I'm worried about:( Moving to a new home, leaving his pasture buddy, AND not having anyone in the field with him, that's a lot for him to take in all at once!

He's been kept on a farm with mostly mares, the owner had a yearling colt and we put he and Jack in a separate field to see if they could co-habitate. I personally didn't see anything other than Jack teaching a few manners but the owner claimed he was very aggressive with him. Of course, lol she is one of those people that makes everything dramatic so it's possible she was exaggerating. That same colt is now a 2 year old in with the herd though, and yesterday I saw them playing in the field together.


I have a separate but related question. Since Jack IS very dominant, do you think it's better to find a submissive type horse that he bosses around or a more dominant horse? His girlfriend is actually the alpha mare in the herd.
     

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