I want to own a horse! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Howard County, MD
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I want to own a horse!

I dont know much about owning a horse and I wanted to learn a little bit before I went head first into it (I sort of already did). I'm not made of money at the moment (in high school but my mom would pay most costs) and was thinking about maybe co-owning with 1 or 2 other people to keep cost down. I live in Columbia, MD and I want to get an estimate of the total cost to buy, feed, board, vet, etc for a month. Any information youd like to share would be GREATLY appreciated. I need some "horse buddies" to talk to and learn from!
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post #2 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 11:45 AM
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IMO, do lessons or if you already know how to ride well, look into a lease.
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post #3 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 11:48 AM
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I'm not a big fan of co-ownership because although everyone involved thinks it's a GREAT idea at first, it usually goes sour pretty quickly.

Have you considered leasing as an option instead? You'll get an idea of what monthly costs would be for a horse without actually having to shell out big bucks for any major vet emergencies or the cost of euthanasia, if something catastrophic happens.

Farrier, vet, feed, and boarding costs all vary wildly by geographical region as well as the quality of the service/food purchased.
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post #4 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 12:03 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2012
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I agree.. If you have space on your property look into a free lease, meaning you board & pay for everything but it belongs to someone else.

As for actual prices, they do vary. I have a hard keeper, he's only 15.2 hh but if he misses one feeding he's back to bones! Lol

Here is an example of my costs: (for one horse only)
$18/bag of equical (highest calory grain here, regular grain is $13/bag) - lasts about 10 days
$12/bag of alfalfa cubes - I've barely made a dent in the bag after about 2 weeks...
$50/1200 lb round bale per month
$40 farrier TRIM every 6-8 weeks (my horse is barefoot, I think you pay more with shoes)

And here are vet costs:
$72 house call (no charge if we bring the horse in)
Floating teeth: $147 + $50-60 for the sedative
Or just to have the teeth looked at $27 ---- once a year
If they need to do any extractions it's $50-500 depending on the tooth, some take 5 minutes, some take 3 hours

Shots:
$48 flu rino - every 6 months
$20 tetanus - every year
$52 west nile - every year

And don't forget about tack you will need to buy!
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post #5 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 01:15 PM
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Prismis did a good job of listing the cost of owning a horse. I want to point out, that unexpected Vet bills can add up in a hurry. While you would hope that your horse remains healthy and has no issues, the chances of that happening isn't realistic. So, be sure you realize the responsibility you are taking on when you own a horse, in regards to their health.

I would also suggest that if you do own a horse, you seek out a top-notch equine Vet to care for it. In my opinion, there are a lot of Vets who treat horses, but a really good equine Vet is worth their weight in gold.

I also would agree w/the other posters here--suggesting that you take riding lessons before you buy a horse.

Good luck to you!
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post #6 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 01:42 PM
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I totally agree with above, especially with SR . Coownership sounds like a potential brew of problems. Look inot part leasing . This is the best way for a newbie who has some real passion to get a feel for "owning" without owning.
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post #7 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 01:51 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: St. Louis, MO
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I would definietely lease a horse first. I currently am leasing on of my horses to a very nice family, and a few months into it they were really enjoying it and wanted to look at buying their own. So we decided to up the amount of the lease to cover the full costs of board, grain, shavings, everything. To see if they could even afford to cover their own horse without buying one just to have to turn around to sell it because they couldn't afford it or didn't have the time to devote to them. They are all involved in sports and some would rather be at the mall than cleaning the stalls. So i'm thankful they didn't just up and buy a horse. This is how so many good horses turn bad, and so many end up in bad homes because people just need to hurry up and get rid of them.(Not all senarios turn bad, but most do/will) I really wish I would have leased prior to purchasing my own.
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post #8 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 03:25 PM
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First of all, welcome to the Forum! :)

Ally, are you taking lessons? That would be my first step, then leasing (or half-leasing) a horse to be sure you are ready for it. Co-owning a horse may cause all kinds of problems between the owners (unless its within a family, and even so).

Now I'm in MD (rather close to where you live, although I'm towards the cheaper county ), so here are the prices (approximately, of course, and they are higher as you go closer to DC):

Board will be from ~$250 (field, most probably no ring, usually not the best care) to $500 (with indoor and stalls). And it's better to look for the place where the horses are turned out most of the time or at least half of the day, not just several hours.

Farrier: ~$40 for the trim (shoeing will be $100+ front, $200 all 4), every 6 to 8 weeks. At the moment I go with 4 weeks in between, because they grow A LOT during hot season and unfortunately I can't do touch-ups myself right now. Usually it's 5-6 weeks Apr - Oct, and 8 weeks in winter for me.

Vet: farm calls seem to be around $60 for most vets I know although it depends on distance of course, and then you pay for shots and coggins (not sure about the price, just don't remember, but something like $150-200, all shots).

Floating: $80-100 (once/year)

Of course you'll need dewormers, fitted tack, brushes, etc. etc. etc.

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass: it's about learning to dance in the rain..."

"When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves."

"How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours."

Last edited by kitten_Val; 09-03-2012 at 03:28 PM.
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post #9 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 03:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val View Post
Ally, are you taking lessons? That would be my first step, then leasing (or half-leasing) a horse to be sure you are ready for it. Co-owning a horse may cause all kinds of problems between the owners (unless its within a family, and even so).

Now I'm in MD (rather close to where you live, although I'm towards the cheaper county ), so here are the prices (approximately, of course, and they are higher as you go closer to DC):

Board will be from ~$250 (field, most probably no ring, usually not the best care) to $500 (with indoor and stalls). And it's better to look for the place where the horses are turned out most of the time or at least half of the day, not just several hours.

Farrier: ~$40 for the trim (shoeing will be $100+ front, $200 all 4)

Vet: farm calls seem to be around $60 for most vets I know although it depends on distance of course, and then you pay for shots and coggins (not sure about the price, just don't remember, but something like $150-200, all shots).

Floating: $80-100 (once/year)

Of course you'll need dewormers, fitted tack, brushes, etc. etc. etc.

Holy hell it costs you 200 dollars to put 4 shoes on your horse?!!! Thats crazy ridiculous! I'm sorry, i was baffled! lol
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post #10 of 30 Old 09-03-2012, 03:30 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leonsbrushofluck View Post
Holy hell it costs you 200 dollars to put 4 shoes on your horse?!!! Thats crazy ridiculous! I'm sorry, i was baffled! lol
My guy charges something like $180 and it's considered to be on cheaper side! (my mares go barefoot, so I pay $40/trim each) Yes, everything is quite expensive here in MD. :)

"Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass: it's about learning to dance in the rain..."

"When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves."

"How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours."
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