If it's broken, buy a new one!
 
 

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If it's broken, buy a new one!

This is a discussion on If it's broken, buy a new one! within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-27-2012, 05:48 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    If it's broken, buy a new one!

    There is something quite strange going on at my barn. I feel like I need to say it out loud here on the forum, in an effort to gain some insight, and maybe just to say what I need to say about it and go on with my life. Haha!

    So here's the interesting thing... there's an epidemic of horses that are coming up lame. Mainly pulled, strained, bruised suspensories. None of which seem to have a prognosis of less than 4-6 months before being brought back in to work. While people are entitled to do whatever they chose with their horses, these particular folks have decided that, since the horse is "broken", they're just going to go out and buy a new one.

    This confuses me. I've had my horse for a little over a year and nearly 3 months in, he wrecked his right front. I thought it was career ending. But I took the time, spent the money, and brought him back the way the vet saw fit. He's my heart. He's my teammate. I cannot imagine him getting injured and just buying a new one.

    Anyone out there seen this sort of thing go on at your barn? Or anyone bought a new horse cause the old one is broken?? Would you take the time to bring the injured one back? Or just give up on him/her?
         
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        10-27-2012, 06:11 PM
      #2
    Trained
    completely freaking out

    This thread sums up my experience. I bought a mare on July 31. She was at my house for 10 days, then sent to the trainer's for 2-1/2 weeks. She was severely injured there. No one quite knows what happens.

    We have been treating her for over 10 weeks. Antibiotics 2 times a day, waking up at 2 am to feed/medicate her so I can be to work at 4am. Stall rest. Joint Flushes. We nearly had to take her to Michigan State University for surgery.

    This horse has become my heart and soul. I've only had her for 3 months and I love her more then the horse I've had for 11 years. I bought her to barrel horse, to be a competition horse. And I only have a 50-50 chance that she'll be sound enough to compete on. We are on 6 months rest, I can't get on her again until another set of XRays in April confirm she's ready. But it'll be so worth the wait to ride her. I'll probably bawl like a baby.

    I nearly had to put her down. She was unable to walk for a few days. We had no idea what was wrong, nor did we know how to treat it.

    I'm not the type of person to throw away a horse that's broken. After everything I have been through with this mare, how COULD I give her up? The bond is that much stronger having been through this.
         
        10-27-2012, 06:18 PM
      #3
    Trained
    I would not replace a horse that went lame.

    If I had the money, however, I would probably buy something new to ride on the road to recovery. Not that I'm running out of horses to ride anytime soon, but if I had just the one horse and some money with no way to ride otherwise, I would.

    Never, though, would I replace or get rid of a lame horse.
         
        10-27-2012, 06:30 PM
      #4
    Started
    I do see a lot of what I see you describing even though I keep my horses at my house. For what I am doing right now with my horses, if one of them got injured I would wait it out and do what I can do to help my horse because I have them mainly for pleasure. Now, if I was professional horse-back rider and that was what I did for a living, I might not be able to afford a 3 month lay-up from slipping in the pasture and could very well sell the horse.
         
        10-27-2012, 08:36 PM
      #5
    Trained
    Wow that's kinda sad, especially when the injuries are mostly due to bad farrier work who leave uber-long toes on the horses. Happily that does not happen at my barn. I personally find that very sad. I would never consider my sweet horse to be a disposable item if he suddenly came up lame.
         
        10-27-2012, 09:50 PM
      #6
    Weanling
    I've never understood the disposable animal mentality. It's a horse, not a machine. 4-6 months of rest seems reasonable, if they REALLY need another horse to ride during that time, why not get a second horse? That way you can alternate.
    HollyLolly likes this.
         
        10-27-2012, 10:13 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    especially when the injuries are mostly due to bad farrier work who leave uber-long toes on the horses.
    I haven't ever heard this before... We did recently get a new farrier for our whole team. The last guy was a nightmare to say the least. The new guy found white line in my pony and was able to cut it all out. I was thankful for that. But we seriously have, I would say, 4 horses and or ponies right now that are laid up from suspensory injuries. Most are just being put to pasture, since our board is astronomical. 2 of the injured horses owners have decided to just sell the "broken" ones and have since bought new ones.
         
        10-27-2012, 10:55 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Good thing Kim Kardashian doesn't have a horse...
    In all seriousness, it is insane how some owners can so lightly give up a horse due to an injury.
    What if my horse decided, "Oh, you're sick? I want a new owner." "Oh, I just bucked you off? Bye, I want a new owner."
    Oxer and Tarpan like this.
         
        10-27-2012, 11:22 PM
      #9
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Oxer    
    I haven't ever heard this before... We did recently get a new farrier for our whole team.
    Long Toe - Low Heel Syndrome - Conley and Koontz Equine Hospital&

    This is a very brief article on how long toes/low heels can cause a lot of stress on tendons. What it doesn't point out is that many people think they are looking at low heels when what they are actually seeing is a very high but underrun heel. Regardless, if the horse's feet at your barn are starting to look like the ones in the drawings, that's most likely the source of the problem.
         
        10-28-2012, 01:01 AM
      #10
    Yearling
    Guess I don't understand either. It took almost two years after Ellie's injury before I could ride her.
         

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