If it's broken, buy a new one! - Page 3
 
 

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If it's broken, buy a new one!

This is a discussion on If it's broken, buy a new one! within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-28-2012, 11:56 AM
      #21
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
    Pasture sound shouldn't be too much of an issue but might require expensive maintenance in the form of regular joint injections, depending on her.
    If it will take joint injections to keep her pasture sound, by the time you're ready to breed for a foal from her, you'll have spent enough in injections to buy whatever you want.

    IMO, if an injury is that bad, I have no problem putting one to sleep or letting them go for free to be used as a broodie by a breeder. Sometimes the way you win is to lose: lose the feed bill, the vet bill and the farrier bill. There are horses out there that the only way to make money is because you're saving it by not spending it.
         
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        10-28-2012, 12:44 PM
      #22
    Trained
    True that, DCA, and that's why I'm considering moving her on/putting her down [probably the latter, with her other issues taken into account], if I can't get her totally sound.

    The vet is going to do x-rays sooner or later, I just need to sort something out to pay for them... and then based on the x-rays I will make my decision. She may need surgery to ever be sound, and the surgery is very expensive and doesn't always work... and she's so lame she looks like she's broken a leg and hasn't done anything in the way of actual work, so in all likelihood this issue is on the more severe end of the spectrum. It would honestly be cheaper for me to give up on her now and put her down than to spend all this money finding out what's going on... but I want to KNOW she won't come good before I give up on her. She's too good of a horse to put down just because I don't want to spend all that money on no guarantee.

    For you who will likely jump on me and say if the cost of x-rays is a problem I shouldn't have horses, this is AUSTRALIA, and my vet is on the expensive end of the spectrum. There's a good chance that just to diagnose the full extent of the problem, the total bill will exceed $1000. We have been charged $1200 for a stitch-up, nothing difficult or in-depth about THAT! We have always had ways of managing to keep our horses in the best of health despite our lack of funds. I can't recall a single maintenance-related issue in the whole time I have had horses... not even a single sand colic, touch wood. Injuries have happened but Mum's an ex vet-nurse so we can deal with a lot ourselves... basically if it needs stitches or a skin flap removed, the vet comes out, but if not, we treat it ourselves. Our vet thinks we've had 2 injuries in the past 4 years. We've had more than THAT! Over the past 4 years we've owned 7 horses and boarded 3, and injuries are a part of life when you deal with that many horses. Particularly individuals with issues, of which we have owned 2 [one with physical issues and the current unsound one, who also has mental issues] and boarded one [whose issue is he has no spatial awareness to speak of, so he's constantly injuring himself].

    Edit to add; forgot to mention, 4 years is the period between when I was 14 to present day, I've actually been around horses my whole life bar a 4-year break when we were living in an area where it is simply too expensive for anyone but the wealthy to own or ride.
         
        10-28-2012, 12:58 PM
      #23
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Strange    
    While I don't like the thought of our horses being "disposable" and certainly don't follow that line of thought, my previous horse DID have chronic lameness issues and I ended up making the decision to donate him to a therapeutic riding center.

    After he tore two massive holes into his RH suspensory (two different branches of it) he was never the same. He had 1.5 years off, with 6 months stall rest and 1 year turnout. We slowly brought him back into work and he seemed to be going pretty well, minus some stiffness that a joint supplement took care of. Before I put him up for sale as a beginner horse I had a pre-sale vet exam done, and he flexed 4/5 on that same RH. There was no point in doing ultrasounds at that point. For whatever reason, all the shockwave, stall rest, cold hosing, etc. in the world hasn't helped. He was a lesson horse for about 8 months, doing mostly W/T for beginners, and after 3 months off for the winter while the owner went to South Carolina, he was almost dead lame at the canter, definitely off at the trot, and just short behind in the walk, even out in the field.

    If I have a horse with chronic issues, I have no problem finding it a better place and buying a new horse. End of story. I can't shovel money into a horse, no matter how much I love it, for continuous, serious lameness issues. I can't. It's not feasible. I'd rather get them healed up as much as possible and let them go on to something that won't tax them anymore than they can handle and then put money towards a horse that I can more reliably count on to be sound.

    If I had the money to buy a horse after mine went lame, I probably would. I'm not ashamed to admit that in the slightest.
    I totally agree on this.. I should edit my statement to say if the horse had some "chronic issue" and I was someone who made a living off of horses, then I would possibly sell the horse.

    I don't believe in giving a horse Adequan, Legend, etc. to relieve pain so the horse can compete or be ridden at a level that he wouldn't be able to do before he got the shots. Now, I would give Adequan or Legend to a horse to make him comfortable in pasture. You can't slap a band-aid over a infected cut and go outside and play in the mud and expect the cut be same as before you played in the mud.
         
        10-28-2012, 03:52 PM
      #24
    Trained
    I have a pasture full of old, useless, lame horses.
    I keep telling myself I won't get another 20+ year old horse, or a lame one, but I have issues with the word no in certain situations.
    I have rehabbed a few, and have some now, that are being offered once they are ready, but I generally hang onto them. Part of being a responsible horse owner, in my opinion.
    However, if a condition is going to affect their quality of life forever, that needs skme serious thinking. Sometimes euthanasia is the best course of action.
         
        10-28-2012, 03:58 PM
      #25
    Green Broke
    Personally if I could afford to keep a horse who went lame and afford a rideable horse you bet I'd keep the lame one. However being 17 and not having pastures out here in the desert it wouldnt be an option for me. If he/ she could be put in a better fitting home ( walk/ pony ride for kids or such ) I would rather do that or if there was ni hope in them recovering I'd most likely put them down.
    For some people it just isn't possible to care for a horse they can't do anything with. That's not being irresponsible that's just how it goes sometimes. Being a minor it'd be out of my hands as well.
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        10-28-2012, 10:32 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    I'm definitely not speaking about a horse that is either chronically lame and or in constant pain. If my horse was injured for life, I would put him out to pasture for early retirement and I would buy a new competitive horse. Our board is brutal, and being stuck in a 12x12 for months on end is unimaginable, so I understand moving the horse out.
    My feeling about my horse currently though, would keep me from ever parting with him. He would be a pasture puff, but would always remain my horse.
    These horses are horses that will, at some point, be rideable again. The vet has explained to the owners that they simply need to take the time necessary to rehab the injury correctly.
    Keep in mind that I am not talking about pro's either. These are just ammy riders and heck, we're not even in show season anymore! So to me, it would just make more sense to stick with your poor broken pony, and see how it works out until the next season rolls around. Just my opinion.
         
        10-29-2012, 12:28 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    I didn't read through all of this, I just decided to post my story.
    I did sell a mare who was no longer sound for the type of riding I was doing, nor would she be at all. She had major back problems. I pretty much gave her away to a family who had 2 little grandkids. This horse I wish I hadn't of sold, even if it meant me not riding, because I could trust her with my kids. I let my 3 year old walk around the whole pasture on her without me. That was just the type of horse she was. Selling her was my mistake, and one I won't repeat again with a horse like her.
    Oxer likes this.
         
        10-29-2012, 01:02 PM
      #28
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Oxer    
    I'm definitely not speaking about a horse that is either chronically lame and or in constant pain. If my horse was injured for life, I would put him out to pasture for early retirement and I would buy a new competitive horse. Our board is brutal, and being stuck in a 12x12 for months on end is unimaginable, so I understand moving the horse out.
    My feeling about my horse currently though, would keep me from ever parting with him. He would be a pasture puff, but would always remain my horse.
    These horses are horses that will, at some point, be rideable again. The vet has explained to the owners that they simply need to take the time necessary to rehab the injury correctly.
    Keep in mind that I am not talking about pro's either. These are just ammy riders and heck, we're not even in show season anymore! So to me, it would just make more sense to stick with your poor broken pony, and see how it works out until the next season rolls around. Just my opinion.

    I think the question then turns to; do they simply not want to spend the time rehabbing the horse or do they think that they don't have the experience to properly rehab the horse? I've known people that honestly would rather give away or sell a horse cheap to someone who will do a good job rehabbing it than attempt to rehab it on their own because they don't think they can do it well/correctly/fully/etc. Maybe, after all the treatment the vet thinks would be proper, it would just be more financially feasible to buy a new horse and sell the current one to someone who is willing to shell out the money for the rehab work and treatment.

    I won't judge someone for selling an injured horse (unless it's like...a small cut or something equally trivial to the ride-ability of the horse) when I don't know the full situation.
         
        10-29-2012, 02:25 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    ^^ This is a very good point, Strange. This is also why I posted this thread! Sometimes you lovely forum folks bring in great opinions and points that I hadn't thought of. And you're very right. The gentleman that parted with his horse the moment he found out that the animal wouldn't be rideable for about 6 months, is not the type of rider that should be doing rehab work. Something I really hadn't thought about.
         
        10-29-2012, 02:29 PM
      #30
    Foal
    I don't understand this either, I bought my mare about a year ago, and when I saw she was perfect but turns out she was drugged, and two days later when I turned to ride her I got thrown hurt my back, and found out her back was in horrible shape, she'll never be 100% again, this was due to a extremely poor fitting saddle and possibly being turn over whilst rearing or a slip which causes a large lump of fluid on a vertebrae on her lower back/tail which has healed...

    I hurt myself pretty badly so I wasn't riding for about 3-4months but when this accident happened I had many people tell me to just dope her and sell her or just get her shot, which I think is horrible as she's a angel on the ground and is she the safest horse I've even met and will eventually make a lovely riding horse...

    I was horrified by people's reaction, to everyone else she was just a broken and had no use... To me she just was injured, and I had to at least give her sometime to let her heal, which I had done and now she's being ridden again and doing well...

    I could image just buying another horse, because she's injured.... :(
         

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