If you're going to Rescue, do it Right!
   

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If you're going to Rescue, do it Right!

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    04-30-2013, 01:50 AM
  #1
Started
If you're going to Rescue, do it Right!

To foreshadow, this is a rant because I am very frustrated by what I have been seeing lately. I am so so tired of seeing horses shuffled around and "rescued" several different times. I see it happening to varying degrees all over the place, but there is a recent instance that makes me want to just pull my hair and scream.

So, there's this 5 year old, unhandled stallion who is the result of an irresponsible breeder. Last fall he was offered for free to whoever wanted to load him up and put some training on him. Several months passed without any interest, and this stud wound up in a kill pen at the auction house -- which of course stirred everyone up into a must-save-him frenzy. It was $400 to bail him out of the kill pen. Finally someone stepped in to pay for him.

Less than a month later, he shows up AGAIN as a horse needing a new home. The person who took him from the kill pen did not advance his training at all -- he is still a stud who isn't even halter broke. His "rescuer" is now asking $500 for him so that other horses can be "rescued". This horse is absolutely positively no better off than he was. He is the same unhandled 5 yr old stud that was being offered for free, now being offered for $500 after being shuffled around a bit. There is absolutely nothing to prevent this stud from returning to his previous predicaments (ie rotting in a field or sitting in a kill pen).

Rescuing a horse takes a huge commitment. If you're going to do it, the least that you can do is be certain that you are willing to commit the massive amounts of time and money that it takes to truly rescue a horse, without the expectation of receiving anything in return save for what might become an incredible riding partner and the respect and admiration that others have for your compassion. In my opinion, a horse has not been truly rescued until it has been given the fullest opportunity to become a useful pleasure or working horse. In the case of this stud, he needs to be gelded and trained trained trained. There is nothing preventing him from becoming a fantastic riding horse -- he just needs someone who will actually rescue him, because he hasn't been rescued yet. He's just been passed along from one place to another.
     
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    04-30-2013, 04:26 AM
  #2
Weanling
I know of someone who "rescued" a horse too. She left him in a field, no additional feed, just the grass. No farrier, dental care, vet care, grooming, hoof picking, nothing. But apparently that was okay because "at least he isn't dog food".
     
    04-30-2013, 05:56 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Your instance has and will be repeated. People usually have good intentions. The problem is that they have a lack of knowledge. They think that they can get a horse really cheap, learn themselves while the horse learns, and get a great bond in the process. What really happens is that it doesn't go as planned. They get frustrated, give up on the horse and leave the horse out in the pasture.

We rescued three horses ourselves. One was taken by a coworker. Not always does it take an excessive amount of money to do it. We did give them extra feed but every other cost was normal care, so far with one pregnant. Training will come in time but we are exploring what they already know.

Mine, I believe was trained already some but there are trust issues and she doesn't respond to cues well.

My wife's is the one that's pregnant. We won't work much on training with her until the foal is weaned. She also seems to have some training but we can't or won't try to push her until later.
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    04-30-2013, 06:02 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Buying a horse from a kill pen isn't rescuing IMPO. It's buying a horse. Sure, the horse is unhandled, but that is an aside to the situation - it is not up to me and you to decide how someone else should train (or not train) their horse. If they stud sells, then it sells, if not, they will deal with it. It's not a rescue case until the horse is being neglected or mistreated, not just treated differently to what you would do.
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    04-30-2013, 10:46 AM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by usandpets    
Your instance has and will be repeated. People usually have good intentions. The problem is that they have a lack of knowledge. They think that they can get a horse really cheap, learn themselves while the horse learns, and get a great bond in the process. What really happens is that it doesn't go as planned. They get frustrated, give up on the horse and leave the horse out in the pasture.
I recognize that good intentions combined with lack of actual knowledge/experience is often the case, but I don't think it applies in this instance. The person who took him in from the kill pen has trained numerous other horses, including successful stallions. I agree though -- this is something that has happened and will continue to happen inevitably, which is why I'm ranting about it. I recognize that there's not much to be done about it, it just irritates the heck out of me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiilaa
Buying a horse from a kill pen isn't rescuing IMPO. It's buying a horse. Sure, the horse is unhandled, but that is an aside to the situation - it is not up to me and you to decide how someone else should train (or not train) their horse. It's not a rescue case until the horse is being neglected or mistreated, not just treated differently to what you would do.
I understand that definitions of rescue vary widely. In this case, I personally think the stud qualifies as a horse who has been neglected and mistreated beyond the lack of training:
-- He has never been given any health or hoof care despite the need for this care.
-- He was kept in a field with numerous other studs and they would fight violently. None of their wounds were ever treated and they were left out together despite the fighting. They have the scars head to toe to prove it. One of the studs was hurt so badly after a fight that he was put down.
-- None of the horses in this field had any shelter. I suspect that some of them had skin problems such as rain rot, lice, and the like.

Many people would also love to say that by the nature of the fact that the stud was prevented from going to slaughter, he was rescued. This includes the person who took him from the kill pen. It wasn't until he was in the kill pen that people really went into a frenzy about saving him, even though he needed the rescuing before he was ever in a kill pen. Unfortunately many people seem to think that a quick death is worse than a long miserable life. There is a part of me that thinks he might have been better off being left in the kill pen if all that will happen now is a continued lack of basic care and training.
     
    04-30-2013, 10:55 AM
  #6
Green Broke
I'm not seeing what the physical condition of this horse was. Is he a "rescue" because he is an unbroke unhandled 5 year old stallion .. or was he emaciated also?

The fact that he is unbroke, unhandled and a stallion doesn't make him a "rescue" in my book ...
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    04-30-2013, 11:07 AM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eolith    

I understand that definitions of rescue vary widely. In this case, I personally think the stud qualifies as a horse who has been neglected and mistreated beyond the lack of training:
-- He has never been given any health or hoof care despite the need for this care.
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasgal    
I'm not seeing what the physical condition of this horse was. Is he a "rescue" because he is an unbroke unhandled 5 year old stallion .. or was he emaciated also?

The fact that he is unbroke, unhandled and a stallion doesn't make him a "rescue" in my book ...
This was the part that I read as qualified as needing rescued from the present owner, BUT there are always 3 sides to EVERY story and we are only hearing Eolith's. I believe there are other members who tend to post similar stories of abuse by someone they know and get people stirred up them have the accused log on to state a different angle on the same story. With that being said I refrain from making comment about the accused.


I am in no way calling Eolith a liar so don't jump to that conclusion either.
     
    04-30-2013, 11:17 AM
  #8
Green Broke
There are plenty of people here that have horses that free roam in a pasture with no health or hoof care. They are thinner in the winter, slick and fat in the summer, manes and tails are knotted and uncared for. There is sometimes a stallion with them and mares foal in the spring.

If they aren't hurt or emaciated, I don't call them a rescue. Not what I consider to be the best of care, or how I keep my horses, but not a rescue.

Rescues, to me, are horses that are in such a shape that if someone doesn't step in, they are at risk of death .. soon.

I've seen plenty of those too..
     
    04-30-2013, 11:26 AM
  #9
Started
I am sharing the information that I have, based on what I know. I do not personally know the horse or the owners, and I don't feel that I am hugely biased. I strive to take as realistic a view as I can. Whether or not everyone agrees that this specific horse qualifies as a rescue wasn't supposed to be my point. It was just an example which I felt was relevant.

I am frustrated by the fact that a free horse has become a $500 horse with nothing to show for it. I am frustrated by the fact that this horse is only likely to be passed along from one person who fancies themselves a rescuer (whether or not they are) to another. Maybe I'm crazy, but I don't think a true rescue has been achieved until the chance of the horse winding up in the same cruddy situation has been reduced as much as possible. For this horse, that would mean becoming a "valuable member of horse society" via training and gelding. It's sort of the principle of feeding a man for a day or teaching him to fish.
     
    04-30-2013, 11:29 AM
  #10
Green Broke
I know it can be frustrating, but unless you have a personal stake in it, or are willing to buy and do "right" by this horse .. there's nothing you can really do.

It happens every day, everywhere, and we can't save them all.

I'm sorry it's frustrating you .. *hugs*
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