I'll Probably Have to Sell My Horse :( - Page 2
 
 

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I'll Probably Have to Sell My Horse :(

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        09-08-2012, 02:30 AM
      #11
    Started
    There's a few products out there (one is called RigCalm) that might help - but people have mixed results from what I've heard.

    My horse is in all likelihood a proud cut gelding - he has a strong interest in mares, will try and act up when they're in heat and is super territorial, aggressive toward alpha geldings, and a whole bunch if other stallion-like behaviour. RigCalm isn't available over here in Australia so I just treat him like a stallion - he gets a paddock to himself, I never turn my back on him, keep full control of him around mares and don't let inexperienced people handle him. He requires regular reminders of who's boss but once he's been put in his place he's a complete doddle, and a sharp reminder will have his mind back on the job at hand if by chance he's distracted by some passing hussy mare.
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        09-08-2012, 05:36 AM
      #12
    Showing
    Personally, it sounds like you are over your head with this horse and are throwing good money after bad with this trainer. I would, without a doubt, rehome him and consider the money you have in him as a lesson learned.
         
        09-08-2012, 08:30 AM
      #13
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saskia    
    I don't know though, horses go for different prices in different places.
    Due to the economy in the US, as well as the drought in some areas, the horse market here is in the toilet.

    With a horse like that the OP will be lucky to give him away, much less recoup any training fees. I think it's rather unrealistic for her to believe otherwise.

    Horses are a gamble. Not all of 'em are going to be winners.
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        09-08-2012, 12:23 PM
      #14
    Banned
    I think it's very unlikely that you are going to be able to sell this horse.

    I am trying to make sense of your situation - so bare with me. You've had the horse for a few years, so I assume he's been at your house and not with mares - but now is at the trainers and these issues are showing themselves?

    If so, you can bring him back home. Have the trainer come out to work him at your house, so he is not around other mares. And then have a pleasure horse that you just ride at home.




    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cheydako    
    Our trainer says he doesn't like to give up on horses and wants to give him another week.
    This statement makes ZERO sense. Sounds very much to me that the trainer just wants an extra weeks income. As she is saying she will give up after the extra week.
    If she had said, I am seeing some progress, give me an extra week to see how he does - that would be one thing. But she is saying, I don't give up, but I am going to in an extra week so please hand over your money.
         
        09-08-2012, 01:14 PM
      #15
    Trained
    I agree with the others that you most likely can't even give him away let alone sell him and make your money back at the moment.
    Taking him home away from the mares and have the trainer come out and finish him is an option. That way you'll try to sell at least a trained horse. There are people who prefer and have geldings only.
    Apart from that, he is an adult horse and much harder to train than a youngster. They are set in their ways, and opinions.
    In this situation I'd have a talk with the trainer if coming to your place would be possible if he would take him , maybe trade, or at least try to sell him for you on commission.
    If he is a cryptochid, he can be "redone ", but it's a full blown surgery and will cost. Since you already stated that he is not your dreamhorse anyway, talking to the trainer sounds like the only possibility.

    Just don't bring him to auction ....he'd end up on a truck to either Mexico or Canada.
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        09-08-2012, 02:24 PM
      #16
    Foal
    EvilHorseOfDoom-Thanks, I'll look into that. It's strange, he's not like any of those other things you described your horse as. He is definitely not the lead horse in the herd and he is very dependent on our other gelding at home. He hates being away from him. We don't have any mares though, which is why we hadn't realized this sooner I'm sure.

    AlexS-Sorry, I didn't explain that very well. He wants to try for another week and if he does not improve at all, then we will stop training and figure out what to do with him, but if he does improve (which our trainer believes there is a good chance he will), then we will keep going and probably keep him just to ride around our farm where there are no mares around.

    Despite what it sounded like in my first post, he's really not a dangerous horse. He doesn't try to hurt anyone and has had kids climb all over him and he doesn't care. He stands still for the farrier, he climbs into a trailer with no problems, and he does great with groundwork. The only problems he has have to do with other horses.
         
        09-08-2012, 03:02 PM
      #17
    Started
    Hmmm, if he's that quiet at home I'd be questioning the ability of the trainer at this point. That or he doesn't like being away from home. Does he herd the other gelding? Or is he just very clingy and herdbound?

    I've seen even a very nutty rig worked with in-heat mares in view (and smelling range) and in capable hands he was fine - it was other geldings that were the problem (same with my fellow, but he will tolerate an old or laid back gelding, just not the sort that prances round and tries to claim his throne LOL). But obviously horses are individuals and will react differently.

    I'd see if the vet could send off for a blood test myself, I'd not be so quick to label him a rig or proud cut if he's only just started acting like this. It could be pain, it could be the wrong training method (not saying the method being employed is bad necessarily, but different personalities can require different approaches).
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        09-08-2012, 03:08 PM
      #18
    Banned
    If he's quiet at home, and you are more than willing to keep him home and just ride him there - can your trainer come to your property to train him?
         
        09-08-2012, 06:49 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    I highly suspect that Mudpie is proud cut. He will drop and harden for mares in heat, but isn't "official" about anything. He's not less of a horse for it, and doesn't behave too terribly differently around mares in heat.

    Snickers is proud cut, as well, but he actually gets in. He cannot get mares pregnant, however. He's also not less of a horse for it, and is just fine.

    It's not the end of the world, and you don't need to sell your horse.
         
        09-08-2012, 08:46 PM
      #20
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cheydako    
    I'm so frustrated. He's been in training for over a month now and showing hardly any signs of improvement when being ridden. Our trainer says he bucks and rears and goes nuts when a mare is in heat. Come to find out, he wasn't properly gelded. WHAT???? He is definitely not going to be the right horse for me considering I'm still somewhat of a beginner. I just hate being in this kind of situation. He was sort of a surprise for me but if I would have had a choice, he would not have been the horse I picked for myself (I was 13 and he was 3 when I first got him 5 years ago). I knew that young kids and young horses don't usually go well together.

    I really don't know what to do now. So what do you do with a horse that isn't gelded properly? Do you get it...ummm...."redone"?

    We'll probably sell him, but we just spent $600 on his training and we have to pay $300 again next week. Our trainer says he doesn't like to give up on horses and wants to give him another week. I don't want to be in the hole after this. I would like to be able to get another horse that is better for me. How much do you think I could sell him for? He is a gorgeous 8 year old purebred TWH. He just has the problems mentioned above. We already had one man bragging about his gorgeous gait who offered to buy him, but that was a few years ago before all this.

    Thanks for reading. I would be so grateful for any advice.
    If I were you, what I would do is get a vet out, gel him properly if it's true that he was in fact not gelded then send him out to a feedlot where some cowboys will use hard every day. They will put a lot of miles on for you, and he'll learn a very work ethic, and come back to you very different than how he is leaving you now.
    If it turned out he wasn't the way your wanted him, then post him for sale, or even offer him for sale to the feedlot where they can continue to ride him.
         

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