I'm confused on how to do this
   

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I'm confused on how to do this

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  • How do I know if i'm too big for my horse
  • Think I'm confusing my horse?

 
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    06-13-2011, 01:02 AM
  #1
Green Broke
I'm confused on how to do this

Okay,so I'm pretty confused on how to do the formula on how much a horse can carry.

My horse is 950 lbs. She is a bit chubby now but looks good.
Anyways,I heard the 20% rule or you can take the horses weight and divide it by 6 and you get the number on what the horse can carry including tack.....well then I would be too big for my horse! Because it came up to 158 inluding tack. I weigh 162 on a good day(my weight varies a few lbs). I would say my tack can weigh 25 lbs total and that's for my treeless and my english tack is a lot lighter....soooo my big butt is to much for my horse.....I am really worried about my weight when it comes to riding.I think a lot of it is muscle but I do have fat.

I don't get to how to do the 20% formula....
     
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    06-13-2011, 01:08 AM
  #2
Green Broke
20 percent of 950 is 190. You're fine.
     
    06-13-2011, 01:12 AM
  #3
Green Broke
....i was never good at math.....thanks BE =D

I still however would like to lose weight and I've been working at it...maybe working at this stable will kick it into gear =D
     
    06-13-2011, 01:19 AM
  #4
Trained
There are as many different opinions as there are people when it comes to weight carrying ability

For a 20% rule we go 950/100 x 20 so 950/100 = 9.5 the multiply by 20 = 190 for weight of rider and tack.

But depending on the build of your horse, and who you ask, and the sort of riding you are doing, some would argue 25% is OK. Now that math is easy, just divide 950 by 4 = 237.5

But the trouble with those simple calculations is that it takes no account of what weight your horse should be, and a fat horse can carry LESS weight than a fit one.

This formula works better as it takes into account the amount of bone your horse has---

Measuring a horse's cannon bone is used by some in determining the approximate weight a horse can carry. A measurement is taken around the circumference of the foreleg, just below the knee.

Add together the weight of the horse plus the rider and tack, and divide this sum by the cannon bone circumference measurement.

Then divide that result by two.

A number between 75 and 85 is good.

If the number is over 85, you probably need a larger horse.


-----------------------------

When it comes down to it the only one who can tell you if you are to heavy is your horse
     
    06-13-2011, 01:30 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Wow..interesting...guess I will go measure her leg!....I mean I think she can carry me fine.She is a medium size and her conformation isn't too shabby either but I would(i know this might sound shallow) like to meet the standards of what people say is good to go and a not so good.
     
    06-13-2011, 02:00 AM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
There are as many different opinions as there are people when it comes to weight carrying ability

For a 20% rule we go 950/100 x 20 so 950/100 = 9.5 the multiply by 20 = 190 for weight of rider and tack.

But depending on the build of your horse, and who you ask, and the sort of riding you are doing, some would argue 25% is OK. Now that math is easy, just divide 950 by 4 = 237.5

But the trouble with those simple calculations is that it takes no account of what weight your horse should be, and a fat horse can carry LESS weight than a fit one.

This formula works better as it takes into account the amount of bone your horse has---

Measuring a horse's cannon bone is used by some in determining the approximate weight a horse can carry. A measurement is taken around the circumference of the foreleg, just below the knee.

Add together the weight of the horse plus the rider and tack, and divide this sum by the cannon bone circumference measurement.

Then divide that result by two.

A number between 75 and 85 is good.

If the number is over 85, you probably need a larger horse.


-----------------------------

When it comes down to it the only one who can tell you if you are to heavy is your horse
Jeeshh.... OK so I printed this for future reference!!! Thanks for doing the math for us!
     

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