Learning to trim feet
 
 

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Learning to trim feet

This is a discussion on Learning to trim feet within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
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    03-14-2012, 11:22 AM
  #1
Weanling
Learning to trim feet

So I'm considering taking a course in trimming feet-- not anything in depth, as I don't want to be a farrier professionally, I just want to be able to trim up my guys' hooves. I've always wanted to learn how to do a simple trim to save me and my family some money (my mom has over 15 ponies on her property and getting them all trimmed can be tough on her wallet!!)

The local farrier charges $35 per horse, and I get their feet trimmed roughly every 6 weeks.

The closest horseshoeing school is about 2 hours away. For a 2 day simple trim course, it's $250 plus equipment, and I bring my own horses.

I would, of course, call the local farrier if there was an emergency or something outside of just a trim, but I'm really looking to save money in the long run just by being able to trim their feet up. Any thoughts? Would it be worth dropping the money to take the classes? Anyone else do this? Just looking for some honest opinions.
     
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    03-14-2012, 11:41 AM
  #2
Showing
I can trim myself, but I don't (unless it's absolutely a must like a big chipping and alike and farrier is not coming tomorrow). Balancing is not as easy as it may sound by watching videos and reading books. Frankly I doubt 2-day course will teach you much (BTW I took a semester class in university (instructor was professional farrier and we had hands-on twice/week and lecture)). The farriers go to special school for several months and then go through bunch of horses to get an experience to do a good job.

P.S. Yes, I know we have people on forum doing it themselves, but to me hoofs are too important to risk. I'll much rather go with the good professional.
     
    03-14-2012, 11:45 AM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
I can trim myself, but I don't (unless it's absolutely a must like a big chipping and alike and farrier is not coming tomorrow). Balancing is not as easy as it may sound by watching videos and reading books. Frankly I doubt 2-day course will teach you much (BTW I took a semester class in university (instructor was professional farrier and we had hands-on twice/week and lecture)). The farriers go to special school for several months and then go through bunch of horses to get an experience to do a good job.

P.S. Yes, I know we have people on forum doing it themselves, but to me hoofs are too important to risk. I'll much rather go with the good professional.
Yeah, they had longer, 6, 8, and 12 week courses for people who were seriously looking into becoming farriers and wanted to learn how to shoe horses and what not. It was just something I was tossing around in my head-- I liked that the quick course required you to bring in your own horses so that you could learn how to trim their particular feet, but the longer (and more expensive!!) courses included working on a variety of horses with a variety of situations. Thanks for the input!
     
    03-14-2012, 12:46 PM
  #4
Trained
Take the course. Trimming or shoeing for that matter isn't rocket science most of the time. You should be able to learn how to trim a horse pretty well in two days. If nothing else you can take enough of your horses with you that they get trimmed and it won't cost you much. The hardest part of trimming is learning how to judge if the hoof is level and how to properly use your tools so you don't make a sloppy mess out of your horses hooves.
HanginH likes this.
     
    03-14-2012, 01:55 PM
  #5
Foal
I think the course would be great :) even if it was nothing more then a learning experience!!! I love learning new things even if I can apply it.

That said my neighbour some years ago decided she was going to do her own "trims" (she offered to do mine thankfuly I politley declined) and she ended up making a mess of there poor feet :S. I thinks she's STILL doing them to this day. To each there own I guess!! Just keep in mind I think its ALOT harder then it looks XD
     
    03-14-2012, 01:57 PM
  #6
Trained
When I started out I was lucky if my horse could still walk when I was done. Some years later I'm adequate and my horses benefit from it.
     
    03-14-2012, 02:02 PM
  #7
Foal
I would take this course if I were you for sure. Actually have been looking for one in my area to go to just to get a better understanding of things. I trim my own now and again but its usally a pretty ruff job. I need my farrier to show me a couple things about shoeing as well because I would like to be able to put one on if my horse lost a shoe at a rodeo and I couldn't get a farrier to do so.
     
    03-14-2012, 02:21 PM
  #8
Trained
Do it! You'll never regret being able to trim yourself. I've been doing our mares since our old farrier convinced me that I could do it myself.
     
    03-14-2012, 02:31 PM
  #9
Banned
I don't condemn those that do their own, but I leave mine to the pros. Good feet are the foundation for any horse, and a good farrier can spot problems and issues early, before they get worse.

Ask yourself this...if you owned a $500,000 racehorse or showhorse would you risk him by trimming his feet yourself? Then ask yourself if your $3,000 horse is any less important or less deserving of the best possible care...
kitten_Val likes this.
     
    03-14-2012, 02:38 PM
  #10
Yearling
I would take advantage of the opportunity! Even if you don't jump into trimming by yourself immediately afterwards, at least you'll have a headstart. Ask the farrier you have now if he could guide you for your first couple trims, then you could have him just check your work as you get more comfortable with it. My farrier loved the idea of me trimming my own horses and is very helpful with any questions that I have. Of course, I pay him for a normal trim even if all he does is look at her feet and chat with me :)
Tianimalz likes this.
     

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