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Looking Again, Please Help Me Search....

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  • Hecuka
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    07-22-2010, 10:41 PM
  #1
Weanling
Looking Again, Please Help Me Search....

OK, everyone knows my soap opera of horse tales that I have been gonig through with Gracie. How Ray and Stephanie sold her as kid broke when she wasn't, blah, blah, blah. She has a new home as of Sunday. She will live in a six stall horse horse barn with a nice paddock and lots of attention from the couple's two sons. The man and his wife loved her and want to use her as a pleasure trail horse for thier son and a broodmare to get a couple mule foals from her. They are a match made in heaven for her :) I am sad, but if she has to leave us, I'm glad it is with them.

We are now looking for yet ANOTHER kid broke, beginner friendly horse that actually is those things. If you know of any that are kid broke, under $800, with a 50 mile radius of zip code 65746, and are trained under Western saddle, post them here or PM the links to me. I appriciate it :) This time, we are taking the horse and me to a instrutor to get a few lessons.

Here are the two I have found so far (and, yes, I am aware that the Draft horse looks like he is a big as an elephant)....

Suffolk Punch Draft Gelding
KID SAFE Appaloosa Gelding
     
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    07-23-2010, 12:31 AM
  #2
Weanling
Bump :)
     
    07-23-2010, 12:37 AM
  #3
Banned
If I were looking for a nice calm horse, I would go with the appy. He looks like a good boy. It would be worth taking him for a ride. He seems to have decent conformation and is very pretty.
     
    07-23-2010, 12:38 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Just as your note - the price is the real problem here. The same thing is just going to keep happening - I don't care HOW bad the economy is, you're dreaming if you think you're going to find a dependable kid's horse that isn't ill, lame or old as dirt. People KEEP their dependable horses and if they DO sell them, it's not for cheap. A lot of time and energy goes into a reliable kid's horse, and while you may luck out, you need to be realistic.

I know I live in Canada but I paid $800 for my unbroke unregistered 2 year old Paint filly. You can't buy a reliable trail/kid horse around here for under $2,000.

Learn your lesson once and GO GET LESSONS.

As for your ads - letting kids ride your horse or leading kids on them does NOT make them kid safe or beginner friendly. I could throw a dozen kids of any age on my 3 year old Paint filly, snap a bunch of pics and pass her off as deadbroke and nobody would ever be the wiser until they got her home and she started being handled by people who didn't know how to finish up her training. Both those ads SCREAM novice to me, done by people who pull the animal out of a pasture once a year and let a bunch of beginners ride it SUPERVISED in the yard. That is not the same as encountering a tractor on the trail or having a car spray gravel at you.
     
    07-23-2010, 12:52 AM
  #5
Banned
Here are a few keys to finding the right horse...if you chose not to take MM's advice (which I support)

If you do decide to take a few lessons first this can be a HUGE help in finding a GOOD horse. Let your trainer know during your first session that you are looking. He/She may be willing to help you find something. They may just have a lesson horse who they want to retire. She may know someone with a horse who is ready to move up. A trainer can help you in more than just learning how to ride.

Try a horse more than once. In this market, horses are on longer. Even a horse that is $850 and well trained isn't moving well in my area. Schedule to see the horse once. If you like it, schedule again.

Show up early. Check for the tell tale signs that the horse has been worked excessivly before you got there. I had a buyer out for my QH yesterday who was shocked that my horse wasnt groomed yet. I am selling him as a better than green broke but not yet beginner safe horse. He needs to do more than ride. I showed her how I groom him, how I round pen him, how I tack him and how I ride him. Then I let her have a go. You should expect to arrive and find a naked, cool horse. Any sweat or warmth, bail. If the horse is already tacked, bail.

Ask tons of questions. Has he ever bucked/reared/spooked/bolted/bit...etc. Ask for farrier and vet references.

Don't buy for looks. Don't buy for papers. Buy for the training the horse has and for the soundness of mind they have. This sounds easy but can be really hard. Sometimes the ugliest horses are the best out there.

Be patient. Don't buy the first thing you look at. Open your search criteria to include all breeds and all ages. A horse for a beginner is seasoned, not half dead. 12-25 is a good age range for a horse with significant training. People try to sell a 5 year old as a beginner safe horse. That's crap IMO.

Good luck. I hope you find something!
     
    07-23-2010, 01:33 AM
  #6
Trained
As far as the price goes, some of the best horses I have ever seen have been cheap-o's (for lack if better term.)

I got my bomb proof, responsive, loving, and well trained TB gelding for $600 and he has amazing leg aids, reaponds to all sorts of vocal cues, knows his name, and has every move down that a horse can know.....With the obvious exeption of pirouettes, piaffes, spins etc. And he is kd broke.

Not trying to sell my horse, but I thought I would share my story because I don't want you to be discouraged by the price bit. My Precious and Pretzel twins were both kid safe kesson horses for $700 and Annie is one helluva jumper for only $800. What you have to oi is look for the great horses with owners who don't know crap about horses. Thts what happened with all the horses above. The owner didnt know what kind if horse she had and sold them off Lucky me ^^
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    07-23-2010, 09:59 AM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
If I were looking for a nice calm horse, I would go with the appy. He looks like a good boy. It would be worth taking him for a ride. He seems to have decent conformation and is very pretty.
I like him, too. My family said to make out a list of horses in our area, and they will pick out a few they like. Then we will go visit with the owners many times, riding and grooming the horse they have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
Just as your note - the price is the real problem here. The same thing is just going to keep happening - I don't care HOW bad the economy is, you're dreaming if you think you're going to find a dependable kid's horse that isn't ill, lame or old as dirt. People KEEP their dependable horses and if they DO sell them, it's not for cheap. A lot of time and energy goes into a reliable kid's horse, and while you may luck out, you need to be realistic.

I know I live in Canada but I paid $800 for my unbroke unregistered 2 year old Paint filly. You can't buy a reliable trail/kid horse around here for under $2,000.

Learn your lesson once and GO GET LESSONS.

As for your ads - letting kids ride your horse or leading kids on them does NOT make them kid safe or beginner friendly. I could throw a dozen kids of any age on my 3 year old Paint filly, snap a bunch of pics and pass her off as deadbroke and nobody would ever be the wiser until they got her home and she started being handled by people who didn't know how to finish up her training. Both those ads SCREAM novice to me, done by people who pull the animal out of a pasture once a year and let a bunch of beginners ride it SUPERVISED in the yard. That is not the same as encountering a tractor on the trail or having a car spray gravel at you.
You see, prices for horses here in MO is not expensive! You can get a lot oh horse for your money. I understand your thinknig they may not be broke for beginners. Before we buy our next horse, we are going to take it out on trails, and hopefully lease for 2 weeks (or more) to make sure it does well in a new enviroment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
Here are a few keys to finding the right horse...if you chose not to take MM's advice (which I support)

If you do decide to take a few lessons first this can be a HUGE help in finding a GOOD horse. Let your trainer know during your first session that you are looking. He/She may be willing to help you find something. They may just have a lesson horse who they want to retire. She may know someone with a horse who is ready to move up. A trainer can help you in more than just learning how to ride.

Try a horse more than once. In this market, horses are on longer. Even a horse that is $850 and well trained isn't moving well in my area. Schedule to see the horse once. If you like it, schedule again.

Show up early. Check for the tell tale signs that the horse has been worked excessivly before you got there. I had a buyer out for my QH yesterday who was shocked that my horse wasnt groomed yet. I am selling him as a better than green broke but not yet beginner safe horse. He needs to do more than ride. I showed her how I groom him, how I round pen him, how I tack him and how I ride him. Then I let her have a go. You should expect to arrive and find a naked, cool horse. Any sweat or warmth, bail. If the horse is already tacked, bail.

Ask tons of questions. Has he ever bucked/reared/spooked/bolted/bit...etc. Ask for farrier and vet references.

Don't buy for looks. Don't buy for papers. Buy for the training the horse has and for the soundness of mind they have. This sounds easy but can be really hard. Sometimes the ugliest horses are the best out there.

Be patient. Don't buy the first thing you look at. Open your search criteria to include all breeds and all ages. A horse for a beginner is seasoned, not half dead. 12-25 is a good age range for a horse with significant training. People try to sell a 5 year old as a beginner safe horse. That's crap IMO.

Good luck. I hope you find something!
Thnaks! All good advice!! I'm not looking for certain breeds or color, AT ALL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
As far as the price goes, some of the best horses I have ever seen have been cheap-o's (for lack if better term.)

I got my bomb proof, responsive, loving, and well trained TB gelding for $600 and he has amazing leg aids, reaponds to all sorts of vocal cues, knows his name, and has every move down that a horse can know.....With the obvious exeption of pirouettes, piaffes, spins etc. And he is kd broke.

Not trying to sell my horse, but I thought I would share my story because I don't want you to be discouraged by the price bit. My Precious and Pretzel twins were both kid safe kesson horses for $700 and Annie is one helluva jumper for only $800. What you have to oi is look for the great horses with owners who don't know crap about horses. Thts what happened with all the horses above. The owner didnt know what kind if horse she had and sold them off Lucky me ^^
Posted via Mobile Device

Oooh, oooh, I'll buy your TB, LOL! He sounds like a good horse :)

Those are about the prices you can get around here. Horses are not ridiculously high.
     
    07-23-2010, 01:07 PM
  #8
Weanling
Any more suggestions? Anyone find a horse in our criteria?
     
    07-23-2010, 01:16 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Just as your note - the price is the real problem here. The same thing is just going to keep happening - I don't care HOW bad the economy is, you're dreaming if you think you're going to find a dependable kid's horse that isn't ill, lame or old as dirt. People KEEP their dependable horses and if they DO sell them, it's not for cheap. A lot of time and energy goes into a reliable kid's horse, and while you may luck out, you need to be realistic.
Regardless of how "good" the economy is, a deadbroke horse is worth a LOT of money, and I wouldn't go under 1500 for a "deadbroke" horse.

You need to ride the horse a GOOD while, and make sure it's suitable. Lots of horses can have kids on them or being led but that does not mean that they are deadbroke. I'd take the advice and go get lesons, but if you're going to go and buy out another horse, save up your money for a /good/ horse. You're risking a lot of shady buyers for a horse that low.
     
    07-23-2010, 06:15 PM
  #10
Green Broke
^

Thanks drybones, that's sort of what I was getting at. There is an enormous difference between a "kid suitable" and a deadbroke horse. Yeah, you may luck out and find someone who doesn't realize what they have for $800 - and more often then not, you'll continue finding the Gracie's in the world, where just because the horse hasn't hurt someone YET, they're "deadbroke kids horses".

A horses doesn't get deadbroke with either intense or extensive training - if it's a younger horse, it's because a pro put a hecuka lot of miles on it and his time is worth more then $800. If it's older, it's someone who's put a lot of years in that horse and likely isn't going to settle for a few hundred bucks.

I get that prices are low, but GOOD horses still sell for GOOD prices. You want to deal with someone reputable, rather then the local BYB who doesn't have a clue. Or you're going to get burned.

     

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