Moving to the big City Brisbane
   

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Moving to the big City Brisbane

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        04-06-2013, 11:52 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Moving to the big City Brisbane

    So I'm moving to the city...Yes I never wanted to do this. I hate citys and I'm a country girl. Since the floods this town has no job opprotunities and due to being 19 with a part time job and a horse I've decided to move 5 hours away to live with my sister and her roomate as they are moving to a place with an extra room. Its going to be an extreme lifestyle change for me and I'm pretty scared. I've never lived outta home but it's defiently time to. I'm trying to get rid of any 'strings attatched' in this current town, such as people that like me a bit more then friends so that it's a little less hard. I think to all my friends here I might just tell them the day I'm leaving. I'm not good with goodbyes.
    So when I get down to brisbane first thing is i'm going to attempt to transfer my part time fast food job to down there so I have something to start with. Then I'm going to flood everyone with tonnes of resumes looking for full time work. Then when I have time I will be travelling to horse aggistment places and viewing them, finding out prices. Most of them are going to be a half hour drive away, some 45, some 15.
    When I find a good aggistment that I can afford then if they don't have a waiting list I will let my family know and we will get Smarty transported down. Until then mum has agreed to look after her and if anything wrong happens ring me. I have to debate whether or not I should try and get someone else to ride her while im gone. I was thinking of maybe letting an old riding instructor borrow her instead. She'd be well looked after, but everyone would ride her and who knows if she could come back being hard in the mouth, not listening to the cues I taught her. I could get a friend to ride her but again, she'd forget my cues.
    I'm really nervous about it all, the idea of living 5 hours away for who knows how long from smarty. It could be a week it could be a couple months. But I have to because there just is not enough job opportunities here, I'm already only gettin 12 hours a week. So I guess anyone has had similar things? I am really nervous. Excited, but I admit I've been crying too. The idea of leaving all my friends, my horse for a time....
    Who's had a similar experience they could maybe share?? Any tips?
    I will be moving to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Anyone here live around that area maybe??
         
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        04-07-2013, 04:44 AM
      #2
    Weanling
    It has been shocking for Aus this year... down here in Tas we had the massive bushfires pretty much the same time you guys had the floods. I don't really have anything helpful to say, just that you're doing what is best and I'm sure it'll all work out
         
        04-07-2013, 07:54 AM
      #3
    Foal
    Hi Tayz,

    I am a country girl that moved to the big smoke and while it is scary and a big life change, it is an exciting time especially while you're young. About 6 months ago I moved from the far south coast (NSW) up to near Sydney as I was moving in with my boyfriend (he is an animator hence the move to the city) and for me I found this quite overwhelming. I love the freedom and lifestyle that I come from. I love being able to ride on the beaches, I love that I know everybody, I love that it is not crowded and is one of the few unspoiled coastline left BUT opportunity and growth is not there so it was time for a change. Like you I was lucky to be moving in with someone I know so having that support will help you settle in a lot more than going alone. When we looked for a place to live I had a few stipulations we needed a place where I could keep the horse and decent backyard for my koolie (dog). It took a bit of searching but we found somewhere. When I moved like you I left the horse at home until I found somewhere to keep her. I found this really helped because I got to know the area first before moving her such a long distance. I found the best way to find somewhere was to talk to the locals, everyone was very helpful and put me onto people they thought might have agistment available. Be prepared though it costs a LOT more to have them near the city (and we are on the outskirts). There is little availability so knowing someone really helps you get in, just keep pushing! Personally I didn't want to be on a large horse property (I couldn't afford it anyway) and ended up on a beautiful property privately owned which for me was perfect because when I go there I feel like I have my sanity with me and my horse time.

    It took 2 months to get Inka up here and it was tough going at first particularly during the job search/job starting phase and coping with the changes in lifestyle. 6 months on though I do get homesick I feel much more settled, Inka helps with this and I now enjoy the city life for what it is, I do enjoy having all my old Uni mates close by and going into the city to do city things, its a great time to do the city things and grow as a person from the experiences.

    Anyways that was my experience hope that's helped you a little :)
         
        04-07-2013, 09:22 AM
      #4
    Green Broke
    Im thinking you need to slow down and think for a minute. You seem to be on a path to set yourself up for failure.
    While fast food is a great job for students , it shouldnt be a career. Your 19 and this is the time in your life you should be accumulating marketable skills that will pay off in the future.
    Take that low skill low pay job and get in a rut with no future skills growth and in 20 years you'll still be in that position. Watching the 19 YO with a couple years of business school show up to be your boss.
    Be a broke student, apprentice, tradeschool, soldier, sailor, for a few years. Learn to do something in demand people will pay you for.
         
        04-07-2013, 09:37 AM
      #5
    Green Broke
    Think your decision over carefully. I don't want to be the negative voice but I feel I should say something. There isn't a lot of work around at the moment, in cities and in towns. And while there may appear to be better positions in the city, or more, remember that you're up against a lot more people.

    I've found that when going for jobs I've actually had better jobs and found positions easier in smaller towns. My experience in cities, especially for retail, hospitality and other entry level type jobs, is that there is often a high staff turnover, with not great conditions and very little staff support and career advancement. However in more rural/regional areas I've found places want to hold onto their staff, they often treat them well because word gets around in small places. It's also easier to get a job sometimes - being a 'local' is something very valuable that money can't buy, and you just don't get that in cities.

    I'm just saying this now because I've moved to a city and the employment opportunities just aren't what they used to be.

    To top it off, the cost of living in a city is significantly higher, as is keeping a horse. What happens if you go to the city and can't get a job for weeks, months, how are you going to cover rent?

    I'm not saying don't do it - I'm just saying think it over. Look at what you want to achieve and the best path to get there.

    Finally, I'm constantly advised never to move anywhere without a job. There is no reason you can't stay where you are while applying for jobs in the city. If you get a couple of interviews go to Brisbane for a few days. Then if you get a good job that you actually want you can move there, and that way you won't be putting yourself in a bad situation.

    Finally I can see your keen to cut ties and move on but this town and these people - they are a part of your life (presuming this is your hometown). Where you grew up. The relationships you have formed there will be unlike any others. There is a friendship with people you have known since childhood, or through your teenage years that generally just isn't found once you're an adult. Many people out-grow their home towns or feel they need to move on, but leave it well. These are your roots and you always want to be able to come back to them. If you leave badly and don't come back for a while, people forget you, they move on and you find that you lost something you never even knew you had but that you can never, ever get back.

    You might say goodbyes are hard, or you're bad at them. But the bottom line is they aren't just for you. It's you acknowledging the people you're leaving behind, the people who will miss you. If you don't say a proper goodbye, to many people it can seem like your friendship wasn't worth saying goodbye to. It's a sign of respect. And like most cultural conventions its not just about one person.

    Okay long post - I only write it all because I do kind of feel like you 5 years later on. I moved to Sydney when I was 17 and it was so hard and the conditions were awful. Coming back home, well lets just say its not really home anymore. And the best experiences I've had, the most things I've learned - they haven't been in big cities.

    Good luck.
         
        04-07-2013, 10:06 AM
      #6
    Yearling
    Thanks guys, Yes before I move I'll be going down there to hand in resumes, then follow up with online applications to other places.
    I do have a few certs that I do hope may help me such as 2 hospitality certs, 1 cert in hairdressing, rsa, rsg.
    My parents will be helping me pay rent for the first few weeks if I go downthere and need help.
    I would like to stay here but I've been searching for months for a new job theres just nothing here not since the floods so many people are still out of work. I agree I might not find a job down there. But if I can start with just fast food as my father said to me. Start with the crumiest job and while working there put in resumes everywhere.
    Saskia thankyou for your words. I think you may be right about the whole friend thing. I'm not good at goodbyes.. But I suppose I better tell them when I find out 100 percent everythings going ahead
         

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