My happy, healthy horse! - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
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My happy, healthy horse!

I was out picking feet today and noticed, to my delight, that Trouble is free of founder lines. This is a HUGE deal for me, as he's never, in his whole life, not had founder lines (or fever lines whatever floats your boat) I'm trying to think of what has changed in the last six months. It almost makes me wonder if he needs to be dry lotted or managed on pasture since we've had no grass for about four months. Although, in past winters he still had prominent rings.

But yay! I've been working for almost three years to make those ugly rings go away! Here's to a happy healthy horse!
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 02:51 PM
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Congratulations!!!
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 02:58 PM
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YAYYY that is great news! Congrats! Perfect way to start off the new year, with no founder rings!

Ride more, worry less.
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 03:07 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks! I don't know why I didn't notice earlier. But got about four inches of nice smooooth new growth, and once he gets husband feet trimmed he should be line free completely! I was always worrying over his feet, especially last fall when he went lame and blew an abscess out his toe :( This summer I'm going to watch if the rings come back, and see if it correlates with him being pastured. Dry lotting around here would be hard, and would mean building, filling in and sectioning off a complete new area for him, but I love those smooth feet!
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 04:23 PM
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That is fantastic news about Troubles hooves!

However, you're going to have to be on guard all year long ----- there absolutely is such a thing as "cold weather laminitis".

What you might do is buy a notebook (yah, I'm old school,lollol) and keep a month-to-month log of his hooves. Depending how fast the hooves grow, which can vary by seasons, it takes 3-4 months to start seeing the new growth.

Keeping a record would tell you when he is most prone to founder. I would also keep track of what the forage is, that he is eating.

For example, Rusty is my healthy horse and while he doesn't founder in the Fall, his personality changes because something in the pasture changes its chemistry and turns him into a 16.H cranky pants for a few months. Nothing else changes, including his hay.

It's possible if Trouble is getting hot hooves in the Fall, something in the pasture is changing its chemistry and affecting him ---- or he is eating tree leaves that are dying.

Every single horse is different, when it comes to the exact causes of laminitis, abscesses, and founder, once Spring grass is out of the picture. By keeping a log, you should be able to pinpoint When Trouble is the most prone to get hot feet.

Also, if you know an equine chiro or massage therapists that also does acupuncture, there are points just above the coronet band called "ting points" that can be treated.

The Cavallo Boots website talks about it. It isn't something the non-taught person should mess around with.

My equine chiro is big into Eastern medicine. She popped Joker once last Fall; the results were miraculous and to-date he has not had another hot hoof episode.


https://www.cavallo-inc.com/equine-ting-points/
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Last edited by walkinthewalk; 01-11-2017 at 04:28 PM.
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 06:23 PM
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That's awesome! Keep it up!
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
That is fantastic news about Troubles hooves!

However, you're going to have to be on guard all year long ----- there absolutely is such a thing as "cold weather laminitis".

What you might do is buy a notebook (yah, I'm old school,lollol) and keep a month-to-month log of his hooves. Depending how fast the hooves grow, which can vary by seasons, it takes 3-4 months to start seeing the new growth.

Keeping a record would tell you when he is most prone to founder. I would also keep track of what the forage is, that he is eating.

For example, Rusty is my healthy horse and while he doesn't founder in the Fall, his personality changes because something in the pasture changes its chemistry and turns him into a 16.H cranky pants for a few months. Nothing else changes, including his hay.

It's possible if Trouble is getting hot hooves in the Fall, something in the pasture is changing its chemistry and affecting him ---- or he is eating tree leaves that are dying.

Every single horse is different, when it comes to the exact causes of laminitis, abscesses, and founder, once Spring grass is out of the picture. By keeping a log, you should be able to pinpoint When Trouble is the most prone to get hot feet.

Also, if you know an equine chiro or massage therapists that also does acupuncture, there are points just above the coronet band called "ting points" that can be treated.

The Cavallo Boots website talks about it. It isn't something the non-taught person should mess around with.

My equine chiro is big into Eastern medicine. She popped Joker once last Fall; the results were miraculous and to-date he has not had another hot hoof episode.


https://www.cavallo-inc.com/equine-ting-points/
I wish I had a horse with hot feet I could feel :( I always always think Troubles feet are hot, but think that's their normal temp. He never has a pulse that I can feel, but compared to spirits his are always warmer than hers. IF I could physically feel what actual hot feet feel like I'd have a much better idea of what to feel for.

I'm also a total fan of notebooks. Something about physically writing something down just... speaks to me. I'll have to start a log. Interesting point about leaves, as Trouble will eat ANYTHING that's not in a feed pan. He even eats burdock bushes, raspberry stocks and apple tree leaves straight off the tree. He's like a goat
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhattaTroublemaker View Post
I wish I had a horse with hot feet I could feel :( I always always think Troubles feet are hot, but think that's their normal temp. He never has a pulse that I can feel, but compared to spirits his are always warmer than hers. IF I could physically feel what actual hot feet feel like I'd have a much better idea of what to feel for.

I'm also a total fan of notebooks. Something about physically writing something down just... speaks to me. I'll have to start a log. Interesting point about leaves, as Trouble will eat ANYTHING that's not in a feed pan. He even eats burdock bushes, raspberry stocks and apple tree leaves straight off the tree. He's like a goat
Don't feel bad about not being able to find a pulse. When Joker foundered really bad, he had passed a hoof tester test by the vet, less than seven days before he foundered. The vet felt a "mild" digital pulse that I couldn't feel and the heat in his hooves did not seem to be excessive.

My understanding is that hoof heat generally is in sync with a horse's body heat, thus making each horse different and driving us right into straight jackets, lollollol

I am so grateful my equine chiro also practices Eastern medicine. She sees Joker once a month and I remind her to feel his pulse at the coronary band,mix she forgets.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-11-2017, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhattaTroublemaker View Post
I wish I had a horse with hot feet I could feel :( I always always think Troubles feet are hot, but think that's their normal temp. He never has a pulse that I can feel, but compared to spirits his are always warmer than hers. IF I could physically feel what actual hot feet feel like I'd have a much better idea of what to feel for.

I'm also a total fan of notebooks. Something about physically writing something down just... speaks to me. I'll have to start a log. Interesting point about leaves, as Trouble will eat ANYTHING that's not in a feed pan. He even eats burdock bushes, raspberry stocks and apple tree leaves straight off the tree. He's like a goat
Don't feel bad about not being able to find a pulse. When Joker foundered really bad, he had passed a hoof tester test by the vet, less than seven days before he foundered. The vet felt a "mild" digital pulse that I couldn't feel and the heat in his hooves did not seem to be excessive.

My understanding is that hoof heat generally is in sync with a horse's body heat, thus making each horse different and driving us right into straight jackets, lollollol

I am so grateful my equine chiro also practices Eastern medicine. She sees Joker once a month and I remind her to feel his pulse at the coronary band, if she forgets.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.
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