New To Working With Horses
 
 

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New To Working With Horses

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  • New to working with horses

 
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    08-29-2007, 04:48 PM
  #1
Foal
New To Working With Horses

Hi there!

I've never had experiance working with horses. However, soon, I will be volunteering at a farm where I will be taking care of the horses. Seeing as many people here have quite a lot of experiance with horses, I was hoping if someone could explain to me a few things. :)

First of all, exactly how dangerous can horses be? What things do I have to watch out for? What kinds of things do they usually do that could be harmful?

Secondly, what kind of work will I have to do around the stables? Should I keep a separate pair of clothes just for that day (won't my clothes get really smelly?) How hard is it? Really tiring or no?

Thirdly, do I have any chance of gaining any muscle from all the stable work? Any chance of gaining muscle riding a horse?

Maybe these questions sound a bit silly - but I'm really eager to know! Thanks and take care!

(P.S., anyone have beautiful Arabs they would like to share pics of? )
     
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    08-30-2007, 04:23 PM
  #2
Showing
Welcome!

I'll answer a few of your questions ;).

First of all, exactly how dangerous can horses be?
Horses each have their own personality; but it's always important to wear a helmet when around them. Horses can be dangerous, but if you pay attention to what they're doing & their behaviors, you'll do fine! I fell off a ton of horses- it's a part of riding!
But it's always good to not act afraid/nervous/angry around a horse, because they sense that easily & might do the same to you! :(


What things do I have to watch out for?
Hmm, all horses are different, but never walk directly behind a horse, or stand directly behind a horse. They cannot see behind them; only to the side & a little bit in front of them. They may kick if you go directly behind them.
If you are walking past them, then just slightly tap their butt a bit to let them know you are there. ;)
Yeah also don't crawl under/lay in front of a horse; hey, it could run you over/trample you! They are like 1,000 pound animals, so trust me, that wouldn't be too good.
There are lots of things you gotta watch out for; but they are just a few.


What kinds of things do they usually do that could be harmful?
Well like I said every horse is different; but some may buck, kick, throw their head up, bite (yes some do bite), or rear up.
You just have to be careful & respectful of them, they should do the same to you. If they are not trained then you will have to be more cautious ;)

Secondly, what kind of work will I have to do around the stables?
Every stable is different; but for the most part, mucking out stalls is a job most of us horsepeople have to do. It does get tiring but it's all worth it in the end! ;) Feeding & watering you will probably have to do too (& some water buckets are heavy!), tacking up horses maybe, etc. Grooming a horse fun though ;)

Should I keep a separate pair of clothes just for that day (won't my clothes get really smelly?) How hard is it? Really tiring or no?
Proper clothing is jeans (old jeans if you have any; 'cause they will get dirty/muddy/ripped), & a t-shirt. Riding clothes are also good.
I mean some work is hard, some is easy; but you get used to it!
It can be tiring but like I said it's all worth it.

Thirdly, do I have any chance of gaining any muscle from all the stable work? Any chance of gaining muscle riding a horse?
Oh yes! You will definitely develop mucles you never knew 'ya had!
Well, riding a horse you do gain some muscles; see it's all about balance too, so yes you will gain some muscles ;).

I hope I helped, I'm sure other people will answer your questions too!
Good luck!
     
    08-30-2007, 11:30 PM
  #3
Foal
I agree with everything said above!!! All I'd add is to make sure the people you will be working for know that you are a beginner with horses, and ask them to give you some tips before you start. Things you might not know or think of, like that you always lead a horse from the left side. I am sure they will warn you if there are any horses you need to watch out for! Let's see if I can think of any other tips. Wear sturdy boots, not tennis shoes if you can help it (toes can get squished if a horse steps on them!) Don't even THINK of wearing sandals or other open toed shoes, save em for the mall! Never make quick movements around horses, it can spook them. Stay calm and relaxed and they will (usually) follow your lead. Try to enjoy what you are doing, even if it is not direct contact with horses - that time will come! I LOVE cleaning stalls, it can be so relaxing, almost like meditation. And I love that my horses really appreciate a nice comfy bed to sleep in. Bring carrot and apple treats, but ALWAYS ask the owner if it is OK before giving anything to their horse - you never know what might be an issue and you don't want to step on any toes. Watch how other people interact with their horses, especially the ones who are gentle and have been doing it for a long time. Most importantly, HAVE FUN!

PS - I have pics of my Arab in the photos forum and a link to a video in the videos forum :)
     
    09-04-2007, 08:12 PM
  #4
Foal
I will comment on the gaining any muscles. As said, you will find muscles that you never thought you had.
When I started riding on a regular schedule it took about 8 weeks for me to truly be out of pain. I had to slide out of my saddle very slow and carefully because I was not sure my knees would hold me. I also have lost to date 50 pounds. So push though and you will not be sorry, It may even save your life.
     
    09-04-2007, 08:20 PM
  #5
Foal
I also want to remind you that I get stepped on by horses all the time so where protective shoes. Riding shoes usually do the trick, or hiking boots. Also whenever your stnding near a horse make sure your legs are spread out so they can't push you over. This applies especially to picking out hooves
     

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