Please help :(
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Please help :(

This is a discussion on Please help :( within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-03-2011, 11:25 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Unhappy Please help :(

    I've posted a little about this previously but I have a bad memory and cannot remember what specifically I posted about. But here I go.

    Last month my brother and I purchased two sixteen (around that age) year old mares. When we first brought them home we waited a few days to attempt to ride them; the only interactions with them were to feed them and groom them, which went surprisingly well for the most part.

    I'm going to go over a few issues that I know need to be dealt with. First off, their hooves have not been trimmed in a long time (I'm guessing a year or two). I'm going to guess that their hooves are a few inches longer than they need to be and there are cracks throughout their hooves. I'm not sure how this affects a horse but I know it can't be good for them. Therefore, I plan to call a farrier (I think that's who trims them) to get their hooves trimmed and shoes put on.

    The second thing I feel may be a problem is their teeth. The first time I put the bridle on my horse she didn't want the bit, but I was able to get her to take it after a few tries. However, that was the one and only time I was able to bridle her. Any other time after the first time has been a complete flop. She won't accept the bit and she'll do everything in her power to get away from it. She has broken two leads by putting all her weight against it and sitting down (on her butt). I am assuming she did it a second time (and almost a third time until I backed away) because she knew how to get away from it.

    I think it could potentially be her teeth bothering her or perhaps it's simply because I am an inexperienced rider who has no idea what he's doing. But then again, I called my cousin over who has ridden horses all her life (along with her husband) and they were unable to get her to take a bit as well -- that's actually when she broke her first lead.

    At this point I am unable to tie her up without her attempting to break away from the lead, even when I am grooming her. I'm honestly clueless as to why this is happening and what to do about it. She's a sweet mare... she's quite calm any other time. I just don't understand what's going on.

    And on top of all this my girlfriend (who has ridden horses all her life) says she thinks she is pregnant (the horse, not my girlfriend, lol). She said that her stomach looks like she is pregnant. And I'll admit that her stomach does carry a little funny... at least, I've never seen a horse's stomach look the way mine does, but I'm no expert.

    So I've got a lot of problems and I don't know what to do about any of them. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-03-2011, 11:43 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    I am so glad to hear that you have some friends and family who are knowledgeable about horses to help you. It really sounds like you bought a boatload of problems. I wonder if the mare had this issue of pulling back before you bought her. Have you been able to contact the former owner and inquire?

    There are several threads on here about working with horses that pull back. It's a serious problem and not easy to fix. I haven't personally dealt with this, have, however, seent the so called "Blocker rings" or "Tie Blockers" used with horses. This is a device that you tie your lead into and when your horse pulls back, if she starts to panic and really pull back, the ring allows some rope to be pulled through it, to relieve her sense of panic. The theory is she will realize she is NOT trapped and will give herself a pause and then will feel a release in the rope. You can get these rings through catalogue sales like Vally Vet Supply and others.
    As for the bit, I would guess you'd want a vet to take a look at her teeth. Who knows how long it's been since she had her teeth floated. Horse have to have their teeth "floated" (ground down) usually annually for optimal health.

    After that, it might improve. Again, I don't have personal experience in this. I would say to work on getting her to put her head down in a halter while waiting for the dental vet to check out her teeth.

    Good luck and I am sorry I could not be more help to you.. Not to worry, it will work out over time. As for her being pregnant (not your girlfriend), Wow, you'd better have a talk with the seller!
         
        04-03-2011, 11:57 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    This is a perfect example of why one should have a vet check the horse before buying. You would have found out if the teeth needed to be floated and any other probloems with the horse to expect.

    To be honest, if I was looking at a horse that hadn't had their hooves done like you said, a year or two, plus their teeth not being done for probably even longer, I would be expecting the horse to be given away because the owner couldn't afford to take care of them. Or possibly the owner didn't care what happened to them. I hope you didn't pay a lot for them, since you'll be dishing it out to get them better.

    Ok. You do want to get the farrier out to deal with the hooves. He/she should be able to tell you what's going on with the hooves and what it'll take to get them back to normal. If they've gone a real long time since trimming, it will take a few trims to get them back to normal.

    Get in touch with a vet ASAP. If the old owner wasn't taking care of the horse, I would have a vet check the horse and get it up to date on shots. They probably can get the teeth done and tell you if she's pregnant.

    For the tying up problem. Horses are claustrophobic, BIG TIME. They hate confinement. She needs to be taught to give to pressure on her poll/top of her head. Will she stand still without being tied? Maybe you could find someone in your area to help you with that. It's not a quick fix and kind of hard to explain on here.

    If your mare is pregnant, congrats! You'll have another horse soon. Not much I can help with that, lol.
         
        04-04-2011, 12:00 AM
      #4
    Showing
    Get the health aspects looked after first and foremost, then start working with a trainer to get the other stuff sorted out.
    The "preggo belly" might just be a worm belly, or she might be preggo - you won't know without a vet. Get them fully checked over and get the feet in order before you ride them.
         
        04-04-2011, 12:04 AM
      #5
    Foal
    The fact that she could be pregnant doesn't bother me a bit. I wouldn't mind another mouth to feed. But my big problem is finding a vet... I've Googled it and I can't find any equine vets in my area... maybe I'm doing it wrong? How do I find them?
         
        04-04-2011, 12:08 AM
      #6
    Showing
    Are there any tack stores or farm supply stores nearby? They will know names and phone numbers. Please do this sooner rather than later - having a vet's phone number is an essential part of animal ownership, unfortunately.
         
        04-04-2011, 12:09 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    Are there any tack stores or farm supply stores nearby? They will know names and phone numbers. Please do this sooner rather than later - having a vet's phone number is an essential part of animal ownership, unfortunately.
    Yes, there is one in town. I'll drop by there tomorrow to see if they have numbers.
         
        04-04-2011, 12:15 AM
      #8
    Green Broke
    You could just call a regular vet. They would probably know one or where there's one that deals with horses. They may also know of some farriers you could use.
         
        04-05-2011, 03:56 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Maybe your horsey friends/family could recommend their farrier or vet. I'd start with the vet and go from there to farrier and then to trainer. I don't have much experience with the pulling back, but you want to rule out any health problems or pain before you try to train her not to pull back. If she's trying to tell you it hurts somewhere, it won't go away until you fix it.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:22 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0