Plotting...any input?
   

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Plotting...any input?

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        07-26-2010, 02:26 AM
      #1
    Banned
    Plotting...any input?

    As some of you may know, my parents aren't exactly thrilled with my passion for horses.

    Well as chance may have it, I have an opportunity to buy a horse. And Cheap!
    A friend of my uncle is selling his 20 year old dead broke ranch QH mare. She was sold once, but the people who bought her changed her feed without introducing it slowly to the mare. She got sick and they gave her back to the original owners.
    They are listing her at $500 dollars, but if someone in FFA or 4-H was interested in her, they would sell her to them for $200.
    The reason she is so cheap is because
    1. She has been on the market for quite some time now
    2. She doesn't have a fancy pedigree and
    3. Her age

    Ok, so as of now, I have enough to buy this horse, a grooming kit, and pay my instructor to give an assesment of her ablilities, temperment, etc. I already have a halter and some basic doctoring materials. (I have no idea why I bought them since I don't have a horse). I also have approximately $500 dollars in the bank in case of an emergency that can be paid upfront if the need be.

    My grandmother is willing to pay for food, farrier costs, vet bills, and so on. She completely offered to do this, and I feel kind of bad that she will be shelling out quite a bit of green on something she will get no return on. So I will be putting in job applications soon so I can help her pay for the costs.

    I have a place to keep her, and at least 3 honest, reputable horsepeople to talk to if I have questions or need guidance with something. I also have magazines, the horse forum, books and tapes to help me if I have questions.

    The only thing standing in my way of buying this horse is my parents. I am still a minor so what my parents say, goes. Regardless of how much preparation I have put into this plan.

    SO.....Is there anything I am forgetting? Does it seem within reason to put this offer on the table with my parents? Any advice on how to approach them?



    I'm not going to throw a hissy fit if you think it won't work. I've got my big girl panties on and I'm going to deal with it.
    I want to know what everyone would do in this situation.

    Thanks for responding ahead of time.
         
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        07-26-2010, 03:29 AM
      #2
    Foal
    I do sympathise, my father refused to let me have a horse and it wasn't until I was an adult that I was able to buy and keep my own.
    Pull out all the stops and get a job so that your plan has some substance. Find the right moment, as I'm sure you know, this makes all the difference with parents, approaching them after a stressful day reduces your chances of success hugely. Present your plan on paper with all the points listed as you have done in your post,( which is impressively thoughtful.) Keep calm and smile even when they seem very negative and reply to all points without getting emotional. Be prepared to leave them to mull it over, even if they seem dead against the idea, don't push them into a corner where 'no' is the immediate response. If your grandmother is happy to talk to them, this would be great.
    Secondly,have you thought about the possibility that the horse you have in mind may not be suitable ? What happens then ? Don't rush in and buy the horse simply because its cheap. Cheap, unrideable horses cost as much to keep as rideable ones. You may have to save up more money to get the horse that is right for you.
    Good luck, what ever the answer you get, don't be disheartened, if the longing is strong enough, you'll get there eventually.
         
        07-26-2010, 06:42 AM
      #3
    Green Broke
    Wow I must congulate you on your well thought out plan :)
    But I agree with the age thing you sure this mare is still suitable to ride 20 is pretty old... but then she might be a young 20 year old... if that makes sense.
         
        07-26-2010, 12:28 PM
      #4
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RedTree    
    wow I must congulate you on your well thought out plan :)
    But I agree with the age thing you sure this mare is still suitable to ride 20 is pretty old... but then she might be a young 20 year old... if that makes sense.
    Thanks for your imput guys!

    I'm not looking for a high dollar show horse. I don't plan on doing serious competing. I will be doing a lot of trail riding and going to an occasional local show. As for your question, she is rideable and generally sound. And I wouldn't mind learning the basics of sorting or cutting. If I did buy her, I would be her permanent owner, so long as I have the means to properly care for her.
         
        07-26-2010, 12:38 PM
      #5
    Banned
    20 is NOT old. 20 is PERFECT for a ffa or 4-Her. These aged horses have so much to teach! There is value in age. It may not be a financial value but oh my is it so much more. I love love love an older horse and a ranch horse at that?! I would jump at the chance.

    Here is my piece of advice on your situation with your parents. Come up with an actual written business plan for her. Start out with: As you have known, it is my ambition to own a horse. While I understand your hesitation in this matter, I would like the chance to prove myself to be responsible enough to care for a horse of my own.

    Go on to outline your exact plan. Get 3 or 4 job applications, fill them out and show them to your parents. Explain to them that because this is your dream, you are willing to work for it.

    Let them know that you fully realize that horses are a gigantic responsibility but you would like the chance to prove to them that you are capable. Be prepared with all kinds of documents. Show them your bank statement. Let them know that you have the money to care for this horse for the long haul.

    Parents are people too. The difference is they are people who want you to be safe, healthy and responsible. They want you to live your dreams. Im sure their worries are mostly financial. Assure them that they wont have to foot the bill and STICK TO IT. If your horse cuts itself in the pasture, don't ask dad for a couple bucks for a vet.

    You sound like a reasonable, responsible young adult. You just need to show them that you are willing to put the time, money and effort into owning a horse of your own.

    Good luck!
         
        07-26-2010, 12:42 PM
      #6
    Super Moderator
    I bought my first horse with no plan. I paid the money and then had nowhere to keep him, no way to trailer him, no idea how to feed and care for him! LOL...

    I found a place, paid the board and fed him, all on my own. I wouldn't do it w/out your parents help, but I did do it.

    You have to maket he deal, keep the grades up and work for it. They may be willing. 20 is a good age for a first horse.
         
        07-26-2010, 12:50 PM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Also in this plan you make state how you are going to get to the horse and your safety while there.

    Even if someone else foots the bill if your parents have to drive you to the horse and back everyday they're not going to be keen. Also, do you have a saddle and rugs? A lot of your savings could be eaten up in horse transport. Remember there are probably extras like bond at your new agistment place, farrier, dentist, saddle fitting etc. that you need to look into - people without horses tend to think that they are cheap so make sure your grandmother knows the real cost. I'm buying a horse in the next couple of months and its going to cost me more than I pay in rent to keep it, not to mention a few thousand in a new saddle, bridle, rugs and transport. Make sure you budget all this in as well as demonstrating you will still have time for study and house chores after your horse and work.

    Its all about showing it won't negatively effect your parents. They might feel bad about your grandmother paying.
         
        07-26-2010, 01:06 PM
      #8
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saskia    
    Also in this plan you make state how you are going to get to the horse and your safety while there.

    Even if someone else foots the bill if your parents have to drive you to the horse and back everyday they're not going to be keen. Also, do you have a saddle and rugs? A lot of your savings could be eaten up in horse transport. Remember there are probably extras like bond at your new agistment place, farrier, dentist, saddle fitting etc. that you need to look into - people without horses tend to think that they are cheap so make sure your grandmother knows the real cost. I'm buying a horse in the next couple of months and its going to cost me more than I pay in rent to keep it, not to mention a few thousand in a new saddle, bridle, rugs and transport. Make sure you budget all this in as well as demonstrating you will still have time for study and house chores after your horse and work.

    Its all about showing it won't negatively effect your parents. They might feel bad about your grandmother paying.
    Thank you for you suggestions!

    As for transportation, I have my own car. It's a two door cavalier, but at least I can get to the barn and back. Right now I am trying to talk my neighbor into a trade for her truck, so all my dad has to do is teach me how to pull a trailer (and besides, trucks are waaay better ) The fee I will be paying my instructor includes hauling fees. The guy who is selling the horse only lives 15-20 minutes away, so hauling isn't a huge issue.

    I have talked with my grandmother numerous times about the cost, but she insists. I even made a breakdown Annual cost sheet (I will see if I can't find it) and she still agreed to do so. I do realize it is a HUGE chunk of money, and that is one of the reasons I want to help pay for the horse. I also want to pay for the horse to show my parents my dedication to the plan. I come from a family where you aren't just handed a bazillion dollars just because you said pretty please. I want to put in the hours with horse ownership, just like everybody else.

    As for tack, I have the luxury of buying second hand tack that would otherwise being going to auction. There a quite a few saddles to choose from, so I am sure I could find something that would fit the horse.
         
        07-26-2010, 01:17 PM
      #9
    Super Moderator
    Day to day keep of a horse isn't really THAT costly. It's the emergencys that get you.

    I have friends that board for $1000 per month but that is pretty high. I kept my horse at a full care facility for $250 per month years ago.

    I would say, Pistol, my 26 year old (who is at my house) costs about $70 per month to feed. That would be hay and grain (his feed is about $22 per bag and he go's through about a two to three bags per month). Dewormer isn't real expensive, nor is farrier service. Shots are about $150 per year.

    It's the emergency costs that get you.
         
        07-26-2010, 01:21 PM
      #10
    Green Broke
    How are you for tack? Is he selling the tack with the horse? I know it seems like a small thing but it can explode in our face if the horse doesn't have tack, or the saddle isn't the right size for you. I bought Cinny back in March and it took quite a bit more of initial start up money than I realized. My old saddle no longer fit me, so I had to get another one, I needed a bridle, saddle pads, etc. Not exactly cheap even used. I thought I could ride him bareback for a while and save up for a saddle but um, that was a definite no go.

    I would write a list of EVERYTHING you will need, each brush, each piece of tack and research the prices...then put the cost next to each thing. Then decide what you absolutely HAVE to have when the horse arrives (halter, lead, hoof pick) and which things you can wait until you save up money. Add up each list...and keep it somewhere where you can look back at it and remind yourself what money you will be needed to put out.

    This might be an eye opener.....I thought I was going to get by with just the cost of Cinny and then maybe 1 or 2 hundred in tack and in reality I ended up spending over 500 on him the first month I had him because something else I needed always came up.
         

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