Problems getting a first horse! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 03:54 AM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouieThePalomino View Post
And one more thing to add to this problem, my parents said to me to it buy a horse without talking to them first even though I do have money. And they always say, what's the point in ahving a horse? The BO has 30, ride them and pretend that they're yours. Or they would joke and say get a motorcycle, they don't eat. But it costs more to fill up your truck than how much a bag of feed costs. I just get so upset that they don't understand that a horse is more than just a lawn ornament.
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Why don't you try leasing a horse first before deciding on ownership?

Horses aren't a one time cost and don't expect to pay only the basics. Always expect the worst and anticipate having the funds/plans in case of an emergency. When my friend brought her first horse home the very first night the horse colicked. The horse underwent surgery, hospitalization, and was transported to a rehabilitation facility. The horse was never sound again and died a couple months later. She spent over 30k on this horse and never got to ride and enjoy him.
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post #12 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Florida
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Ok, here's an update: Today I made a spread sheet showing all of the costs monthly and yearly for keeping a horse for the first year. Please tell me if I left something out or I'm wrong [I didnt include tack in this because I would be able to borrow a saddle and later set aside money to buy my own]
I am now writing an essay to explain why I want a horse. Here's the spreadsheet:


COST OF KEEPING A HORSE
Need Cost Monthly Frequency Cost Yearly
Initial Cost Of Horse $600 $600
Board *$175 Monthly $2,100
Feed *Included in board Monthly $2,100
Feet $35 Every 9-10 weeks $35
Coggins $30 Twice a year $60
Potomac Horse Fever $26 Once a year $26
Rabies $20* Once a year $20
Tetanus $43 Once a year $43
Flu/Rhino $28 Once a year $28
Worming $15 Twice a year $30
Teeth Floating $35 Twice a year $70
Emergency Fund $100 Monthly $1,200
Total For First Year $6,312
*The board could possibly end up being free or discounted due to volunteer work at the ranch.
*Feed is included in the board unless extra feed is needed

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post #13 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 01:15 PM
Green Broke
 
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Now calculate the cost per first year of leasing a horse and compare the 2. I agree with you leasing a horse for a couple of years before trying to own one at your age for the simple fact that there is no way you can guarantee your focus will not change once college and so forth come into play.

I would seriously advise you to lease for a minimum of 1 year before thinking of buying.


P.S. I see no initial emergency fund before purchase... There is a thread here somewhere where the owner bought a horse, got it home and it coliced the first night then after several months of expensive($30,000 IIRC) vet bills it was put down without ever having been ridden.

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post #14 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 01:30 PM
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Location: BC, Canada
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Speaking as someone who just got their first horse 2 months ago at the age of 27, there is a LOT more to owning a horse than knowing how to ride. Things that come to mind that you'll need to know a fair bit about: nutrition, hoof care, first aid, recognizing symptoms of serious problems that require vet care, and some training. Even if your going to be under the watchful eye of your boss at the ranch, they have 30 odd horses to look after, they may not notice if your horse looks slightly off or is exhibiting early symptoms of disease or injury, so that's going to be up to you to recognize.

Hoof care, that will mostly be up to your farrier, but it IS important that you can recognize a good trim from a bad one to know whether your farrier is doing a good job or setting your horse up for lameness. Also, your $35 estimate for trimming every 9-10 weeks does not take into account the possibility of requiring shoeing, and some horses require more frequent trimming regardless.

Nutrition, even if feed is included and you allow your horse to follow the same nutritional plan as your ranch owners horses, you still need to know what is going into your horse, how to recognize if your ranch owners feed plan is a sound one, how and when to supplement.

First aid, horses are notorious for getting into things that they shouldn't and hurting themselves. You need to know when a scrape just needs a cleaning and to be left alone, and when its severe enough to call in a vet. Also, recognizing signs of lameness, illness etc.

I would NEVER, as a 16 year old, purchase a horse without my parents knowledge and approval. They are after all, the ones who you may have to rely on if you lose your job, if things don't work out at this ranch you work at, if your horse gets severely sick or injured and needs emergency vet care that you don't have enough saved for.

Anyways, those are just a few things that come to mind at the moment that you may want to consider.

ETA: your math doesn't add up if the $175/month includes feed. You've added it to your total twice.
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Last edited by kenda; 04-12-2013 at 01:33 PM.
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post #15 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 01:31 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Texas
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I think you should have a job FIRST before even thinking about buying a horse. That way you can show your parents you have the income and responsibility to care for the horse and it won't be their burden. I don't fully disagree with you owning one instead of leasing, but leasing would be a good option to see what it's like to care for a horse that is essentially "yours."

Also, I know you say you can borrow things from the BO, but let me just say from experience this can turn real sour real fast. You should plan on having all of your own equipment, including saddle, bridle, brushes, etc. to avoid any unnecessary issues from popping up. Another thing about having your own stuff is that it needs to fit the horse correctly, what if they don't have a saddle that fits right?

It sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders and are seemingly mature enough to take the appropriate steps to have your own horse. Good luck with it :)
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post #16 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 01:39 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Florida
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I see that you put getting feet done every 9/10 weeks. Depending on the horse, it is more like every 6 weeks, sometimes even sooner than that.

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post #17 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadyy View Post
Now calculate the cost per first year of leasing a horse and compare the 2. I agree with you leasing a horse for a couple of years before trying to own one at your age for the simple fact that there is no way you can guarantee your focus will not change once college and so forth come into play.

I would seriously advise you to lease for a minimum of 1 year before thinking of buying.


P.S. I see no initial emergency fund before purchase... There is a thread here somewhere where the owner bought a horse, got it home and it coliced the first night then after several months of expensive($30,000 IIRC) vet bills it was put down without ever having been ridden.
Yes, that's a good I idea. I'm planning on talking to the BO tomorrow and see if she has any horses I could lease an ect...
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post #18 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 02:48 PM Thread Starter
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Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MsBHavin View Post
I see that you put getting feet done every 9/10 weeks. Depending on the horse, it is more like every 6 weeks, sometimes even sooner than that.
I know every horse is different and may require different needs ect.. My dad was looking for an average and that was the best I could come up with
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post #19 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 02:52 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hephzibah, GA
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I agree with EmsTNwalker, borrowing stuff can lead to problems. I would have every aspect covered, including tack. This way you don't have to worry about problems you may encounter with the BO and tack.
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post #20 of 39 Old 04-12-2013, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Florida
Posts: 460
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenda View Post
Speaking as someone who just got their first horse 2 months ago at the age of 27, there is a LOT more to owning a horse than knowing how to ride. Things that come to mind that you'll need to know a fair bit about: nutrition, hoof care, first aid, recognizing symptoms of serious problems that require vet care, and some training. Even if your going to be under the watchful eye of your boss at the ranch, they have 30 odd horses to look after, they may not notice if your horse looks slightly off or is exhibiting early symptoms of disease or injury, so that's going to be up to you to recognize.

Hoof care, that will mostly be up to your farrier, but it IS important that you can recognize a good trim from a bad one to know whether your farrier is doing a good job or setting your horse up for lameness. Also, your $35 estimate for trimming every 9-10 weeks does not take into account the possibility of requiring shoeing, and some horses require more frequent trimming regardless.

Nutrition, even if feed is included and you allow your horse to follow the same nutritional plan as your ranch owners horses, you still need to know what is going into your horse, how to recognize if your ranch owners feed plan is a sound one, how and when to supplement.

First aid, horses are notorious for getting into things that they shouldn't and hurting themselves. You need to know when a scrape just needs a cleaning and to be left alone, and when its severe enough to call in a vet. Also, recognizing signs of lameness, illness etc.

I would NEVER, as a 16 year old, purchase a horse without my parents knowledge and approval. They are after all, the ones who you may have to rely on if you lose your job, if things don't work out at this ranch you work at, if your horse gets severely sick or injured and needs emergency vet care that you don't have enough saved for.

Anyways, those are just a few things that come to mind at the moment that you may want to consider.

ETA: your math doesn't add up if the $175/month includes feed. You've added it to your total twice.

Yes, thank you for your good advise! I would never up and buy a horse without talking to my parents first, it just spells disaster. And I wouldn't be buying a horse any time soon even if they do say I can, I would probably wait intill summertime so I can get more expirience in those areas that you told me about. I was planning on talking to the BO about it tomorrow and have her teach me about these things intill she and I feel like I know enough to progress to buying a horse. Right now, I'm trying to get my parents to consider me doing that and possibly owning a horse.
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