Question about trailering long distance?
 
 

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Question about trailering long distance?

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    10-23-2012, 06:42 PM
  #1
Weanling
Question about trailering long distance?

So my daughter is considering going to grad school half way across the country. Well, a good 10 hours away anyhow, and taking her baby with her of course...How would that work? Can you keep a horse in a trailer for 12 hours or so without getting out for some exercise etc? Do you have to somehow find a boarding barn someplace along the way? I assume you really can't pull over at a rest area and let em out for a bit?
But seriously... how far can you reasonably trailer at one time? How do people that move horses long distances work that out? ANy suggestions?
     
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    10-23-2012, 07:08 PM
  #2
Yearling
Subbing because I really need to know too:) Possible cross country trip coming in a few years (New Jersey to Montana)!
     
    10-23-2012, 07:56 PM
  #3
Started
Most people recommend not letting your horse out unless you have a guaranteed great rest spot and a great loading horse. You do at least want to stop and let your horse rest (in the trailer) every 3-4 hours for about 15 minutes to rest his legs and for you to offer water and fill up hay bag.
iridehorses and cebee like this.
     
    10-23-2012, 09:41 PM
  #4
Green Broke
I hauled three of my horses, myself, from the OH/Pa border to SoCal in a 4-horse open stock bumper trailer ------------ five years later I hauled them back to Southern Middle Tennessee, where we are now retired.

I made both trips in 5 days/4 nights.

If whomever's driving the truck is a seasoned driver in all sorts of road "events" and can stay awake, the 12 hours is doable. There were times we were a few hours late for a layover due to road construction; that meant my horses were in the trailer nearly 12 hours.

The vet that gave all my horses physicals and my health certs to travel with (GET A HEALTH CERT!), hauled her horse back and forth to vet school, which was 10 -12 hours away.

She told me since my horses were not event horses in superior condition (meaning well muscled, they would actually make the trip better than a horse in top condition.

She also said it would be way less stress on them for me to haul them as they were in their own trailer and understood how I drive. They might have each lost 20 - 30 lbs going to California but I don't think anyone lost anything coming back to Tennessee.

Do NOT let the horses out at a rest stop for anything. If you think you want to lay over or rest the horses, let them spend a night somewhere and that's when they get taken off the trailer.

I can't say enough good things about www.horsemotel.com

I only gave The Boys, literally, a handful of grain, once we stopped for the night but made sure they always had hay in front of them in the trailer. I offered them water every time I stopped for gas which was often in my ancient GMC with a big block that you have sneak up on it with the key, just to get it started.

No water out of gas station hoses. Buy purified water inside the store and offer that to your horse when you stop.

No sheets but they all wore face masks because my trailer's an open stock.

If your daughter does take her horse, just be sure it is UTD on shots, tell the vet where the horse will be living so he/she can check with vet's in that area regarding what shots are needed, and make sure Coggins and the Health Cert are current. Last I knew Health Certs need to be within 30 days of traveling.

Taking the horse isn't near as big a deal a letting your daughter go That's a big lump-in-the-throat-moment for every mom

Hope this helps
cebee likes this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:24 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Plan your trip around traffic and weather, but dotn unload anywhere with access to a highway, horses are way better off staying in the trailer, take a 15 to 30 minute break every four hours. Offer hay and water. A couple days prior to trip I would start feeding soaked beet pulp. To give them a water reserve and to keep the guts moving.
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    10-24-2012, 06:16 AM
  #6
Weanling
Walkinthewalk: Thank you! Excellent info. Could she just leave him in the trailer over night if she had to stop? That would be a long time in the trailer but at least a break from the constant movement? I know we will get a membership in USRIder for any potential truck or trailer breakdowns on the way.
By the way... my daughter is considering Grad School in Murfreesboro... anywhere near you???
     
    10-24-2012, 08:06 AM
  #7
Green Broke
____

[QUOTE=cebee;1730727]Walkinthewalk: Thank you! Excellent info. Could she just leave him in the trailer over night if she had to stop?I wouldn't do it, even if the horse is so laid back he could do the driving That's a very long time with no way to really move around. Along with taking a chance of stocking him up, I honestly don't know how that much time being confined would affect his internal organs. Horses were designed to keep constantly moving.

Over night lay-ups are very cheap. I don't know what they are in today's world but when I moved to TN in September, 2003, the most I paid per horse was $15; the average was $8 per horse. It's worth the $$. Every layover had a room for me to leave my truck and trailer AND the two big Ryder Trucks (yea, I moved every THING both times-lol). We would all pile in the dually (including the Spoiled Rottenweilers) and head for a motel.

That would be a long time in the trailer but at least a break from the constant movement? I know we will get a membership in USRIder for any potential truck or trailer breakdowns on the way. BIG high five on that one. I forgot about US Rider - well worth the investment


By the way... my daughter is considering Grad School in Murfreesboro... anywhere near you???She must be going to MTSU? That's about 40 miles NE of me and the Rutherford County Co-Op is on one of the main roads that leads right into MTSU[/QUOTE]

Rutherford Farmers Cooperative I can say this is one of the biggest and nicest Co-ops in the district when it comes to things for horses. Your daughter could run her college credit card right to the max at this store - lollol

Then there's Bedford Tack, about 22 miles south of MTSU, where she really could do serious damage - lol lol Bedford Tack

We buy my 26+ Arab's bermuda hay "somewhere betweeen" MTSU and Woodbury. The guy is a professional hay grower and also has great mixed grass hay. He's on the pricey side ($6/bale last year) but I can guarantee his hay is weed-free. He's extremely polite and likeable but a no-nonsense guy that doesn't like to talk; he's got work to do and just wants to get you loaded - lol lol

I know your daughter's boarding her horse but just in case hay becomes an issue, I do have the fella's contact information. Does she have a place to board yet?

If not, I know someone who is wonderful and probably the only person east of the Mississippi I would trust with my horses, if I had to board.

I have never been to her facility (we have met and had some business dealings as she's been a member of my local forum for years) - she is somewhere between Murfreesboro and Lebanon, so I don't know how that drive would effect your daughter in terms of time and gas money, which, Middle Tennessee is one of the lowest in the U.S. For gas prices, at the moment.

Home - Lazy Day Horse Farm

I can promise you this woman is ethical, very trustworthy and treats each horse like they are hers. You could check to see if she has any openings, as I know she does have times when she's full. She and her husband built this place and much of the "blood, sweat & tears" are theirs. I can say your daughter's horse AND your daughter would be very safe here
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    10-24-2012, 08:13 PM
  #8
Weanling
I am sure a tack store would be #1 on my daughters priority list once she gets to a new area... probably before food and lodging!
Yes, that is the school she is thinking of. It would be next fall, so a while away. She fell in love with Tennessee while in High School, just hoping she does not meet some boy down there and stay... too far from Michigan for me! =)
Thank you sooo much for the info. I am going to have to somehow bookmark all of the info for if and when she moves there.. the barn you mentioned sounds really good. We will definitely have to keep that one in mind.
I know some people mentioned putting apple juice or something with flavor to add to the horses water when you travel, so they do not refuse water that tastes 'different' as they travel.
Hmmm....letting the horse drive... that would be a thought... lol...
     
    10-24-2012, 08:53 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Don't forget a brand inspection!
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    10-25-2012, 06:09 AM
  #10
Weanling
What is a brand inspection??
     

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