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Question About Value.

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        12-10-2011, 07:39 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    LittleZeasel, I'm pleasantly surprised by your response. When I put my feelings out there, I almost went back and deleted what I wrote because I was afraid I would get jumped on. I never should have mentioned the "s" word. But I figured that is why you stated prices would rise.

    But anyway, thank you for not jumping on me. I kind of feel strongly about it, and I think most horse people do. It seems to be an either "for" or "against" thing. Not very many people are in the middle. Even my best horse-friend is pro-slaughter. I sometimes feel alone. Maybe I am naive for trying to live in an ideal world where horses don't go to slaughter. But I think we should at least strive towards that goal.

    And actually, I like being able to go out and buy a horse. Before the market dropped, "good" horses were hard to find in my price range. So it's cool to be able to afford a gaited horse, even an imperfect one.
    LittleZeasel likes this.
         
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        12-10-2011, 08:00 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    LittleZeasel, I'm pleasantly surprised by your response. When I put my feelings out there, I almost went back and deleted what I wrote because I was afraid I would get jumped on. I never should have mentioned the "s" word. But I figured that is why you stated prices would rise.

    But anyway, thank you for not jumping on me. I kind of feel strongly about it, and I think most horse people do. It seems to be an either "for" or "against" thing. Not very many people are in the middle. Even my best horse-friend is pro-slaughter. I sometimes feel alone. Maybe I am naive for trying to live in an ideal world where horses don't go to slaughter. But I think we should at least strive towards that goal.

    And actually, I like being able to go out and buy a horse. Before the market dropped, "good" horses were hard to find in my price range. So it's cool to be able to afford a gaited horse, even an imperfect one.
    :) When I got my email beep to tell me, that I got reply to this thread, I was afraid to look, because I thought people will tear me apart ;) ...
    So - there, definetly two of us :)

    Let's hope that cute horse here finds a good home, no matter the monetarian value or price :)

    G.
         
        12-10-2011, 08:11 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LittleZeasel    

    Let's hope that cute horse here finds a good home, no matter the monetarian value or price :)

    G.
    I agree! I wish I lived in a state with pasture. I would surely go and collect up several $500 horses and be happy as a clam! I would love a horse like the OP's. Unfortunately hay is $18.50 per 100lb bale, and I have to feed hay year 'round. So it gets expensive. If I had pasture, I would have a bunch of lovely horses!
         
        12-10-2011, 08:22 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Where I live, you'd have a hard time selling that horse now. No one wants to buy horses in the winter when hay prices are at their highest, especially horses that can't be ridden now. In the spring, however, you could probably get a couple hundred dollars for her. Throw 30 days on her and take some pictures of her in tack, and you'd get more. In Canada, it's all about the season, it seems.
         
        12-10-2011, 08:28 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    1. Figure out her age (ask a knowledgeable friend, or vet to look at her teeth)
    2. Figure out her height. (you can measure her in inches from the ground to the top of the withers. Then convert it to hands 4 inches=1 hand)
    3. Maybe post a video of her? So we can see the way she moves

    The first two are a big deal. A young, tall horse may easily be worth more than $500. Dependent upon where you live.

    I would also finish her. That should bump up the price another $250. If done right.

    In conclusion, a tall (over 16h), young (over 4, but under 10), finished horse could bring in 1,500. Here, that is.

    What are your motivations for selling her? You can't afford her, or you want to make money off of her? I would really consider giving her to someone you trust for free if you can't afford to keep her. I wouldn't trust a random joe-shmo to take care of your mare.

    Realistically, you won't make nearly as much as you've put into her. That's just the horse market.
         
        12-10-2011, 08:44 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I sold my registered 16hh buckskin twh gelding, who was greenbroke, for 1000 on the spot. The guy didn't even ride him. Said he could tell all he needed to know from how he moved.


    Guess it depends on who your buyers are?
    People who really know gaited horses and can spot the really good ones seem to be willing to pay more, in my experience.
         
        12-10-2011, 09:42 PM
      #17
    Banned
    Regardless of your personal feelings about slaughter, the fact remains that slaughter facilities in the US closing had a very chilling effect on the US horse market, particularly on the lower end of the market for family/pleasure and trail horses.

    I have two horses in my paddock right now. One is a rock solid, dead broke, well educated registered 10 yo QH that is sane and sound and anyone can ride. He also had good feet and is a ridiculously easy keeper. Ten years ago a horse like him would have been anywhere from $2500. - $5000. He was free to me. The owner could have gotten $1500. For him but much preferred to know he was in a good home.

    The other is a drop dead good lucking, athletic QH, 9 years old that requires a little riding but is a boatload of fun. Also free to me, and for the same reasons.

    It's a tough time to sell a horse.

    If a lot of the unsound, unsuitable, badly bred, need more work than they'll be worth horses were taken out of the bottom of the market, my two horses' market value would increase.

    I may not like the mechanism by which the glut of unsalable horses will leave the market; but I can't deny the effect it would have on the market, no matter how distasteful I might find it.
         
        12-10-2011, 09:57 PM
      #18
    Banned
    I honestly don't believe that the horse slaughter ban was what caused the giant drop in horse prices. Sure, it was a factor, but I think the far bigger player was just the general tanking of the economy. Becaue you can't figure supply and demand into it, as supply stayed pretty much constant--the same number of horses were slaughtered as before, just out of the country. And the value of a kill horse may have dropped, but shouldn't much affect the value of a good, broke horse, since those were never going for kill, anyway.

    We're just in a recession and will be for awhile. Unless you want to blame the housing market catastrophe on the slaughter ban, too.
    Joe4d and BornToRun like this.
         
        12-10-2011, 10:06 PM
      #19
    Banned
    No, I don't want to blame the housing market drop on the slaughter situation, which wasn't technically a ban at all; the US gov't just stopped funding inspection for the plants.

    My view of the cause and effect relationship is this: if you're an average backyard horseperson or 4-Her, and you want to sell your current horse and trade up to something nicer/fancier/more capable, you have a heck of a lot of trouble finding a home for the horse you have now. Assuming that you're not going to sell your sweet, useful but outgrown horse for a $100 and risk the he's going to ride a double decker to Mexico, you hold on to him and defer trading up. The glut of horses at the bottom of the market has a chilling effect on the whole market, because your average owner isn't trading up. Yes, the economy figures into that as well, but when you can't give away what used to be a nice entry level horse, that means no one's buying the second or step up horse. Which chills the entire market, except for the performance horses at the very top end. And I do attribute the current glut of horses at the bottom of the market to US slaughter houses being forced to close.

    However, I do think there's a market for the OP's horse with the right circumstances.
         
        12-10-2011, 10:15 PM
      #20
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by maura    
    No, I don't want to blame the housing market drop on the slaughter situation, which wasn't technically a ban at all; the US gov't just stopped funding inspection for the plants.

    My view of the cause and effect relationship is this: if you're an average backyard horseperson or 4-Her, and you want to sell your current horse and trade up to something nicer/fancier/more capable, you have a heck of a lot of trouble finding a home for the horse you have now. Assuming that you're not going to sell your sweet, useful but outgrown horse for a $100 and risk the he's going to ride a double decker to Mexico, you hold on to him and defer trading up.
    But you could have sold him for $500 a few years ago, maybe, and still risked him going on a double decker. Just to Illinois.

    Quote:
    The glut of horses at the bottom of the market has a chilling effect on the whole market, because your average owner isn't trading up. Yes, the economy figures into that as well, but when you can't give away what used to be a nice entry level horse, that means no one's buying the second or step up horse. Which chills the entire market, except for the performance horses at the very top end. And I do attribute the current glut of horses at the bottom of the market to US slaughter houses being forced to close.
    That's where the number's don't add up, though. If the same number of horses were slaughtered in the past few years as ever before (as they were), how does that constitute an abnormal glut?
         

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