Registered vs Unregistered
 
 

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Registered vs Unregistered

This is a discussion on Registered vs Unregistered within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Registered horse vs unregistered
  • Registered or non registered horse?

 
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    09-10-2008, 11:49 PM
  #1
Trained
Registered vs Unregistered

I have found a horse. I like the way he looks on paper as well as the photos I've seen of him. I have yet to go visit him.

He is unregistered and I have no problem with that, but my fiance does.
He says its like buying a car that doesn't have a title. And I understood it from that point, but I don't know.
He's concerned that the horse is stolen, and when they finally find the horse, I will be out a horse and the 2k that we paid for him.

Any ideas to help me sway him?
     
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    09-10-2008, 11:52 PM
  #2
Green Broke
That is what the bill of sale is for. Registered does NOTHING unless you plan on doing breed shows.
     
    09-10-2008, 11:55 PM
  #3
Foal
All papers are good for are breeding and showing. If you don't plan on doing either, then is doesn't matter. A title is not like registered papers, all they do is say who is mom and dad and when they where born and breed. If you like the horse, go for it
     
    09-11-2008, 12:51 AM
  #4
Green Broke
You're getting another horse??? Wow I have been out of the loop :)
     
    09-11-2008, 05:03 AM
  #5
Weanling
Sorry, but your fiance is totally wrong! Being registered has nothing to do with ownership. As a matter of fact, I know of one horse trader who would hold papers back if he could and put them on others to get more money. For example, if he had a registered mare, say a bay who wasn't broken, and had another bay mare who was broken, he would sell the broken mare with papers to get more money for her. You have to be pretty careful who you buy from. Many are unscrupulous. Many registries are now doing DNA testing but years ago they didn't and it was easy to switch papers. As someone else said, all you need is a bill of sale to prove you bought it from someone and that it wasn't stolen.
     
    09-11-2008, 07:24 AM
  #6
Weanling
Since you said "he" I assume the new fella is a gelding. Ok, you can't breed him so what's the point paying extra money for a 'registered" animal when you can't breed him? The only thing that would matter is if you want to show in breed specific shows. Being registered just proves that the horse is a "purebred" of a certain bred.

My gelding is an appendix QH. Why should I register him?? Bragging rights? Is he going to jog smoother if he is registered? Your bill of sale with CYA in case of theft. There should be a vet record, a coggins, a bill of sale. Never hurts to jot the sellers licence tag down on the paperwork either.

Up here in the New England area, papers seem to be very important. :roll: In the mid Atlantic, nobody could care less. It was appearance and performance that mattered. Some people set a lot of importance in registration papers .... and then charge you a good bit more money because he is registered. WHY? What's the point in a gelding?
What do you expect out of this horse?
     
    09-11-2008, 08:01 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DashAwayAll
Since you said "he" I assume the new fella is a gelding. Ok, you can't breed him so what's the point paying extra money for a 'registered" animal when you can't breed him? The only thing that would matter is if you want to show in breed specific shows. Being registered just proves that the horse is a "purebred" of a certain bred.

My gelding is an appendix qh. Why should I register him?? Bragging rights? Is he going to jog smoother if he is registered? Your bill of sale with CYA in case of theft. There should be a vet record, a coggins, a bill of sale. Never hurts to jot the sellers licence tag down on the paperwork either.

Up here in the New England area, papers seem to be very important. :roll: In the mid Atlantic, nobody could care less. It was appearance and performance that mattered. Some people set a lot of importance in registration papers .... and then charge you a good bit more money because he is registered. WHY? What's the point in a gelding?
What do you expect out of this horse?
Im in agreeance with that!
     
    09-11-2008, 02:34 PM
  #8
Trained
You'll have to excuse my fiance.. he's new to horses and that (the title thing) was the closest thing he could come up with.
I know with a gelding you can't breed him. For showing, i'm not sure what I want to do, though I doubt I would go to breeds.

Free_sprtd- yes I'm getting another horse. Vega is still mine, as in I'm the one who's on her papers, but my fiance has taken on the role of riding her and doing everything with her. So he said for a birthday present I could get another horse :) YAY! I love him so much.
     
    09-11-2008, 04:53 PM
  #9
Showing
I sort of agree with a lot of the responses - to a degree.

There is an old saying that goes "You can't ride the papers". I think that was started by someone who didn't have a registered horse.

Knowing his breeding can help with the job he may be fit for. It can also tell you about any inherent problems. As an example, any horse with Impressive in his background is at risk for a terrible disease know as HYPP; how would you know without his papers. I've often used a horse's papers to contact previous owners concerning his training or quirks. There is also the reality of knowing his correct age - many 15 year old horses have been sold as 10 year olds. Regardless of the fact that he is a gelding, a registered horse is always worth more then one that isn't - that is just a matter of fact. It doesn't matter that he can't breed,

So while I agree that a gelding is a gelding registered or not, there are very compelling reasons to have a papered horse.

It is also very difficult to switch papers on horses. The one you are switching to must have the exact markings as the original. That's not to say it isn't done, just very difficult. As for proof of ownership, same as the title on a car, whoever has the horse and the papers is the owner. You may be able to steal a horse, but to steal a horse and his papers then forge the owner's name - a lot more difficult.
     
    09-11-2008, 07:28 PM
  #10
Started
I think you guys should read this.

http://www.trot.org/forum/showthread...ghlight=papers

I am one of the ones who believes that papers are extremely important. Not just for breeding. I won't say I would never buy an unregistered horse. It would be unlikely, but there would be times when it wouldn't matter.
     

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