Resale projects?
   

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Resale projects?

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  • Buying horse resale project
  • make money training horses

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    04-03-2012, 09:29 AM
  #1
Weanling
Resale projects?

I'm curious what everyone's stance on resale project horses is? As in, buying an unbroke/very green horse and training it (properly, of course), then selling it off to someone. Also, would you ever consider selling your horse to someone who plans on only training it and getting rid of it again? I know there's a lot of people who hate the idea, but I'd love to hear some reasons why some of you think that.
     
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    04-03-2012, 10:19 AM
  #2
Weanling
I see no problem with it. I like to buy young cutting rejects work this them get them into team sorting/penning and sell them. I sold my cutting mare to someone who is going to show her for a year and resell her. Horses are livestock and if you can make money working with them and selling them why not.
What drives me nuts is people who when they sell a horse want to keep track of it. It gone you sold it why keep care where it is.
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    04-03-2012, 10:34 AM
  #3
Green Broke
I know some people look down on it. But there are different levels of "horse traders" out there. The key is to build a good reputation and turn out nice horses.

I will pick up a horse that I actually like and wouldn't mind having myself and put some riding on them and then sell them. Usually they just have a couple of bad habits that the previous owner couldn't/didn't know how to fix that would be an easy fix for me. Then sell him to a home that would be a good fit.

I am not out to make a quick buck and lie about the horse to get him sold. It is more like a fun project and if I manage to make a few bucks then its a bonus. But I also have the pasture and resources to make it work. If I don't sell the horse it's not that big of a deal, I picked him because I liked him and he will work well for my uses as well.
     
    04-03-2012, 10:49 AM
  #4
Started
I've been doing this for a long time, but i'm not a horse trader. I typically take in rescues, buy from the meat pen, ones with behavioral issues or neglect, or off the track. Then I spend as long as it takes to get them going good, then sell them, with the goal of finding them good homes.

I don't need to keep track of my horses, but there is the odd one I'm really attached too and I would like to know if they ever need to sell, so I have the opption of buy back. Its not a nessesity, but great if the buyer doesnt mind.

As far as selling to some one who is going to train and resell, it depends. If its a kid who wants something he can ride the snot out of and re sell at the end of the season, probably not. If someone wants to take one of my green prospects, put miles and shows on it then resell, sure. For me its all about the future for the horse, will it be used and thrown away, or gain experiences that make it more valuable?
     
    04-03-2012, 11:43 AM
  #5
Weanling
Thanks for your input! I'm surprised I didn't have anyone really complaining. I've seen a bunch of people on this forum complaining about how "wrong" resale horses are so I thought I'd get more critics.

I was asking because my family and I are moving in a couple months to a farm, so I will be able to get another horse since we won't need to pay for board now. (Provided I have the money to pay for all other costs, as I have absolutely no intention of asking my parents for any money.) I'm looking into getting a summer project with the hopes of maybe making a little money, but I feel like because of my age (I'm 15) people are going to be very hesitant to sell me an unbroke horse. I have plenty of experience training young/problem horses, and spent all last summer breaking ponies for a guy who didn't have anyone light enough. Plus I have a trainer, and a bunch of other people I could contact if I found I needed help with anything.

I'm glad there's at least a few people who think they're not all bad! I've always thought they sounded like a good idea for someone with the experience and ability to properly bring up a green horse.
     
    04-03-2012, 11:59 AM
  #6
Cat
Green Broke
I see no problem taking on a horse, adding good training to it (or fattening it up to proper weight - whatever that horse actually needed), and then turning around and selling it.

In fact, I gave a horse with some issues away free to a trainer with the understanding she may sell him after he had training on him. The training would help secure his future more than anything I could do for him so it was in his best interest.

What I do have a problem with is someone buying a horse for say $500, then turning around within days or weeks and trying to sell it for double or triple what they bought it for - Especially if they lied to either the original seller (don't worry - he will have a great home with us!) or lied to the new buyer (sure, we've had him for years, or we added X training on him since we got him, or we've had him long enough to know he is 100% bomb proof and kid safe).

As long as someone is honest about the horse to all people involved - then I'm okay with it.
     
    04-03-2012, 12:01 PM
  #7
Started
I was 15 when I used my own money to buy my first horse, a yearling. Then over the years I was given a yearling, a 5 year old, rescued a 6 year, halter broke a 3 and 4 year old and started them under saddle.none were broke. I've never asked my parents for money, always paid all my own bills and I boarded. It can be done, be careful with the horses you pick, confidence is easily shattered and hard to repair. Be prepared to keep a horse as long as you need to, some i've had for 2+ years before finding the right home. I had some great help and the attitude that I knew nothing compared to those around me(which was true), so I learned lots.
     
    04-03-2012, 01:00 PM
  #8
Started
The first farm I worked on did this. The owner was an older gentleman who would drive to Kentucky and pick up 3 or 4 TWH 2 and 3 year old stud colts. He'd bring them back to Illinois and geld them, I'd put 60 or 90 days on them or what was needed to make them at least trail safe for an experiences rider and then he'd resell them back down south. It was his way of business and it taught me some solid riding.
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    04-03-2012, 01:03 PM
  #9
Trained
I LOVE finding a nice horse that's had a few days training put on him so that he's at least not too bronc-y and picking him up to bring home and ride for a year or so and then sell as a really well ridden trail horse. I sell those horses for a good amount of change, vs untrained youngsters that sometimes go for pennies on the dollar.

I'm like the poster who buys what she likes, rides him and then sells. If the horse sells for what I want for him, fine, if not, fine too because I don't buy anything I wouldn't keep. I'm also not opposed to finding the horse his very own little girl to love on him and ride him and selling him on to a good home.
     
    04-03-2012, 01:04 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Anybody who is good at this does us ALL a favor. They produce well-trained horses to put on the market ready for a long life of service. Those horses messed up by "backyard, no account" hobby trainers, who have no business doing so, are the ones that are hurting people.
     

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