Retiring your horse
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Retiring your horse

This is a discussion on Retiring your horse within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • When to retir your horse
  • Where to retire ponies

Like Tree6Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-02-2013, 06:39 AM
  #1
Foal
Retiring your horse

So, you' ve owned your horse most of its life, or maybe not that long, but its riding career is over. What is your plan for your horse's retirement? A 401(k) stashed away? Picking a sunny day to send them to heaven despite good health? Maybe just trying to find a "good home" by offering them up for free and hoping the person who takes them is true on their word.
What about retirement board? Would it be within your means to retire your horse to a facility wherein they took full care of him/her for the rest of their days? Maybe close to home? Or maybe somewhere physically easier for the horse to live where "getting them through the winter" isnt such a hardship?

I'm interested to hear your thoughts. I own a 29yo arab, and a 33yo Wb and have come to realize that these horses work so hard for us, break their minds and bodies for us, that maybe they need a good place to rest.
I am thinking of opening a retirement farm in the aiken SC/augusta GA area. Who here thinks there would be an interest in a professionally run retirement facility?
Posted via Mobile Device
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-02-2013, 07:24 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
A friend of mine retired her horse in a way that I would like to follow, when the time comes. She hasn't sent her horse anywhere, she would never consider PTS just because the horse is older, instead, she is boarding him where she can visit him every other day, she has sold all his tack and she spends her time with him just by going on walks in-hand, by teaching him some stretching exercises and easy tricks, by ground driving a little, generally - by giving him some food for mind and providing him a good horses' life, 24/7 in pastures with a friendly herd. The horse is thriving and almost looks better than he did in his working days. He's a family member to her, a friend, and she wouldn't consider just parting after all those years of partnership and self-sacrifice both of them have put into their relationship.
Boo Walker and EliRose like this.
     
    10-02-2013, 07:54 AM
  #3
Trained
I am a believer that as long as possible, horses need a "job". So, when I had to retire my Clyde cross, I free leased him to a therapeutic facility. He gives 1-2 30 minute lessons 5-6 days a week, which consist of walking on a lead for the most part, and the rest of the time he is in a pasture with his friends or getting loved on by disabled or ill children or Vets. He is very well loved there, seems happy and still has purpose, and they just LOVE him. I love going to see him and see for myself just how much he is giving. When he can no longer do this, he will return to where my other horse is boarded and live out his days as a pasture puff. As long as he is comfortable he will have a place with me.
aubie likes this.
     
    10-02-2013, 08:03 AM
  #4
Started
If I can afford it, I plan on keeping my boy boarded at his current stable (potentially elsewhere if I move down the line, but this is one of the cheaper full boards), and take him out regularly for a good brushing and bath as necessary. If this is too expensive with any potential horses that I may have in the future, then I will probably look into retiring him in a pasture at my boyfriend's family's farm.

I completely agree that a horse's life should not end once it is not rideable. However, I also understand that horses are very expensive. Not everyone can afford to keep a retiree in addition to his younger, sounder replacement. That said, there is no excuse for letting your horse rot away in the pasture because they can't be used. If you have a hard keeper and can't afford the upkeep, then put him down. Don't just let him wither away to nothing, and be VERY careful about finding him a "retirement home" with some strangers in a pasture.
     
    10-02-2013, 08:09 AM
  #5
Green Broke
My dad's mare has navicular. She may come sound after field rest after a long winded and expensive treatment she has received, but she may not. She is in no pain, and currently lives in the lap of luxury with the most lovely family in the Netherlands.

If I had the ability to send the horse to a retirement home, or stick it in a field with oldies I would till the horse reached that 'point'. Unfortunately a lot of horses don't pass away in their sleep and drop weight and have a tough time.

If I didn't have the availability for the horse to live out his days, or the horse was in pain, then I would put to sleep. You have to take every horse and situation as different.. no black and white answer ;)
     
    10-02-2013, 08:10 AM
  #6
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
I am a believer that as long as possible, horses need a "job". So, when I had to retire my Clyde cross, I free leased him to a therapeutic facility. He gives 1-2 30 minute lessons 5-6 days a week, which consist of walking on a lead for the most part, and the rest of the time he is in a pasture with his friends or getting loved on by disabled or ill children or Vets. He is very well loved there, seems happy and still has purpose, and they just LOVE him. I love going to see him and see for myself just how much he is giving. When he can no longer do this, he will return to where my other horse is boarded and live out his days as a pasture puff. As long as he is comfortable he will have a place with me.
That is something else I would look into. The lady that ran the therapeutic riding center that I volunteered at in high school (it was then located at my barn) was always trying to convince me to let her use my horse in her lessons once a week. Seeing as how my horse was in full training and I was showing him I wouldn't allow it, but I'd definitely look into it in the event he became mostly unusable. Especially if I wouldn't have to pay full board...
     
    10-02-2013, 08:20 AM
  #7
Green Broke
My horses go and live with my Mum when they get older, we currently have 1 30yr old pony and a 22 yr old companion at home with mum, living the life of Riley. They come in and out of the stables as they want, have the run of 4 acres of land, are fed a couple of times a day and generaly doted on.
When we had Pride, he needed work to make him happy. When we retired him to the field (age 23) he went down hill fast, brought him back into work and he happily hacked out 2 - 3 times a week with a tiny tot on his back and lived very happily untill he was 28, he was rather fat towards the end, we finaly lost him to Colic.

I'd never send/give a horse away to a stranger nor.

I'd only have a healthy horse PTS if I had no other option (so if mums wasnt available) the best thing I can do for a horse who has given me his all is to ensure I can control his future. If the only way to control that future is to have it PTS then I'll do it to ensure that there is no chance of the horse suffering. The saying goes "Better a month too early, than a second too late".
     
    10-02-2013, 08:50 AM
  #8
Yearling
My mare is definitely not elderly, but at 19, she's got an opinion about how much she wants to be ridden ;)

For now, the plan is to keep her where she's boarded for the forseeable future. We are considering building out a barn and pasture on our property, and I think the timeline of that will probably coincide with when she's ready to really retire, at which time she'll come home permanently.

My biggest concern is that whenever she finally sees her last day- which hopefully is many years in the future- how will disposal work? There are a few horses buried on the boarding property now, but I have never had the conversation with them regarding whether or not they'd let another one be buried there. I personally detest the idea of shipping off to a rendering plant, but I'm not sure what my other options are. I know she'll have the best of care up until the end with us, but then what happens after is something I need to work out.
     
    10-02-2013, 08:52 AM
  #9
Green Broke
I dealt with the "what to do" question with my kids first mare. After my thinking and planning, she led the process.

When she became too old to keep up with the day to day work, she became the favorite for short rides by us (check water, open or close a gate, get the mail) and took unskilled guests around the pretty pasture in front of the house. When her conformation changed and saddles didn't fit right, but she still felt well, she became the horse that we led little ones on with a bareback pad. When really all she wanted to do was stand a bit, eat a bit, and drink enough, that's what she did. For about 8 months.

Finally, most of her teeth were gone. She was 32. Winter was coming. And there was no way I was going to a) keep her stalled (away from others and risk the health problems associated with that), or b) let a predator take her down and... well, they start eating herbivores like horses, deer and all while still alive!

So I put her to sleep, non-chemically, because of the toxic results on the environment. She was not going to be able to maintain health that winter and condemning her to that would have been unkind.
its lbs not miles likes this.
     
    10-02-2013, 08:58 AM
  #10
Super Moderator
I believe old horses should be honored and cared for as long as they live. I have one buried on a hill behind the house. I was lucky with him because he died instantly at the age of 38 on his own. No decisions to make,

I have a 29 year old that is nearly blind that I've had since he was three. As long as he is healthy, he has a home in my best stall and maintains the status of king of the barn.
Posted via Mobile Device
aubie likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retiring the favorite toy NBEventer Other Pets 0 11-04-2012 12:32 AM
Does it sound like I need to think about retiring her permanently? Britt Horse Talk 9 05-29-2012 11:54 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0