Rider "Cocky-ness" and a "Know It All" Attitude - Page 2
 
 

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Rider "Cocky-ness" and a "Know It All" Attitude

This is a discussion on Rider "Cocky-ness" and a "Know It All" Attitude within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Cocky horse riders

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    05-16-2013, 10:56 PM
  #11
Trained
All I know is, there is a fine line between confidence and cockiness, and the horse will always gladly oblige the latter.
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    05-16-2013, 11:11 PM
  #12
Trained
SweetRide, it could of went one of two ways. You could of still been "cocky" and a "know it all" and blame the horse or the way you decided to see it....I think your headed in the right way :)

(I'm 30+ yrs. Old and still get reminded that I am not as good as I would like to think..LOL)
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    05-16-2013, 11:49 PM
  #13
Green Broke
See..I know a few know-it-alls that I've confidently knocked down because I have the confidence in what I DO know, but the desire to learn what I do not.

I know I won't feel a bit bad when I see K faceplant into the dirt from a dead run again because he let his horse go full out and didn't know what was on the other side of a hill..and didn't have his heels down or a balanced seat.

But personally..I'm confident and egotistical, not a know-it-all. I love to tell someone right if they're wrong, and I'll act better than them if they try and do the same to me. But, if I don't know something..you can bet your whole ranch and the animals on it that I'll ask someone, be it someone at the barn or someone (well..everyone lol) on here.

But, I have an ego and love to show it, which can get me into trouble sometimes, lol. But, I'm confident I can get my horse to stop, go, and turn..but that's it, lol. If I fly off and faceplant, I'll take the blame for not sitting right and laugh along with everyone...And then I'll ask if anyone saw what happened so I can learn from it. (:
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    05-17-2013, 03:24 AM
  #14
Super Moderator
I used to be a know-it-all with an opinion in everything. Started out at a NH barn which taught their students the opinion that all "traditional" horsemanship methods are bad, bits are by default cruel, and so on. So I was never too short on words to share about how everyone was ignorant or too hard on their horses, except, of course, those who followed the NH principles. Oh my. I still blush remembering that phase.

After things started going wrong in that barn, I bought a horse from them and moved away to a different barn, where people with NH and "traditional" backgrounds lived and trained together in harmony. That opened my eyes and I learned to receive every piece of information with gratitude, as I understood how actually little I knew and how narrowly I was taught. Now I'm trying to catch up, but it will always be a reminder to me - never assume you're completely right. And, if you feel very confident that you are, think it over. Twice. With an honest and humble attitude.
     
    05-17-2013, 03:40 AM
  #15
Trained
Almost everyone in the teenage phase is full of bravado. I know I am still, but I'm also not as much as others because I tend to be afraid of most things and know when I'm going to get hurt. That just came from me learning on the school of hard knocks, and I know I have a lot to learn. That is why I am doing all I can at my apprentice position, and watch and ride in lessons.

However, I think that is why teenagers are GREAT tools for difficult horses. I tend to be the one who gets put on the buckers, or does the groundwork with the horses who kick and rear. Mainly because since I am still in the fearless teenage phase, if a horse jumps at me, I'm probably going to fly at him like a crazy crack lady and make him wish he hadn't. When you get older, that gets harder. I did a lot of it because my trainer had a major shoulder injury and couldn't, so the job just stuck with me.

I do, however, feel my body wearing down fast. Even though I'm barely within reaching distance of being an adult, I find myself getting sore easier, hurting more, and realizing I know less and less.
     
    05-17-2013, 03:45 AM
  #16
Trained
I get "cocky" when I'm terrified.

Honestly I do! I listen really well when I can listen, but when I'm scared I'm an absolute nightmare to teach because I alternate between "I know!" and "I am!". If I can't 'get' something I work myself up into such a state... my coach is incredibly patient and puts up with so much crap from me because I'm quite a nervous rider so my default setting tends to be 'scared'!
     
    05-17-2013, 05:35 AM
  #17
Weanling
Its always the way! When people watch...u could say oh my horse doesnt kick when playing with his tail..asoon as ppl watch ur horse kicks you to prove you wrong.

I've always said miover can understand english LOL
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    05-17-2013, 05:45 AM
  #18
Weanling
My new horse doesn't let me get cocky
     
    05-17-2013, 05:46 AM
  #19
Weanling
Horse riding world is full of know it alls..even though there is not just 1 training method..ppli lived with before always thought NH doesnt work and called it natural horsemansh*t

There world was all about blue ribbens,


Is why I don't want to show, as I don't want my horse world to be about blue ribbens
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    05-17-2013, 10:01 AM
  #20
Started
For me, ribbons were just a bonus. First and foremost, it was about the camaraderie. I loved hanging out with a bunch of people who love their horses as much as I do, who have talent and drive, and who are so willing to help you overcome a horse-related problem. I would not trade my showing years for anything.
     

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