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Shooting a wild horse

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  • Wild horse blm
  • Is sport shooting of wild horsesallowed in the us

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    05-09-2012, 07:24 PM
  #21
Started
According to the BLM management office, horses that are on private lands are covered by the USDA, or by the tribe if on indian land (or land that borders indian land - tribes can claim the horses if called about them) and are managed as "feral" - typically animal control will be called if they are considered a nuisance. As the horses aren't branded while they are free-range there is no way to accurately say that a horse is a blm horse, a usda horse, a tribal horse or just plain abandoned except by the land that they are currently on.
     
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    05-09-2012, 07:24 PM
  #22
Showing
I stand corrected!
     
    05-09-2012, 07:29 PM
  #23
Cat
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
according to the BLM management office, horses that are on private lands are covered by the USDA, or by the tribe if on indian land (or land that borders indian land - tribes can claim the horses if called about them) and are managed as "feral" - typically animal control will be called if they are considered a nuisance. As the horses aren't branded while they are free-range there is no way to accurately say that a horse is a blm horse, a usda horse, a tribal horse or just plain abandoned expect by the land that they are currently on.

Interesting considering what the law states and the fact that my first BLM mustang I adopted was collected from private lands in Wyoming.
     
    05-09-2012, 07:30 PM
  #24
Weanling
This is sad.
However. If I may speculate a bit about why it upsets folks so much.
Most folks aren't used to thinking of horses as wild animals, or animals to be used for consumption. They are both -- just like a deer, wild boar, bears, foxes, coyotes, etc. All are equally majestic, and it's just as sad every time one is shot... But, they are animals. And we are top predators. As long as he didn't torture the mare before her death, then it's just the food chain at work, in my opinion.

That, and provided he didn't violate any laws, then he is within his rights to shoot an animal. I don't like senseless killing - that is, I prefer animals to be shot only for their meat and almost every part of it used, but that is an ideal that does not exist.

Also, as another poster previously mentioned, brumbies in australia are actually a foreign species introduced way-back-when by settlers. They compete with native species, and wreak havoc on the landscape with their hooves. Not saying this makes them deserving of a bullet, just giving ya'll the other side of the coin.
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    05-09-2012, 08:44 PM
  #25
Green Broke
Horses are animals. If a wolf was coming in and killing your foals or calves you'd shoot it, well to me, all animals fall under the same rules. If it was a nuisance animal and had become
Dangerous the right thing was done. If it was done in sport, he did wrong.
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    05-10-2012, 12:47 AM
  #26
Trained
Ok folks, in Australia, brumbies are an absolute pain in the backside. The Australian landscape is a very delicate one, and our native animals extremely sensitive. Brumbies running in huge numbers in extremely senstive areas of land in Australia (particularly the Alpine regions) has been creating immense damage. Many native marsupial species are now endangered due to the brumbies presence in these national parks. Brumbies trample the topsoil, creating severe erosion, thus making is extremely difficult for vegetation to regrow in those areas.
Left unchecked, with no predators (we don't have any of your mountain lions, bears etc.) to help keeps numbers down, the brumby population will grow rapidly, causing immense damage to the Australian fauna and flora.

These horses aren't pets. Some can be re-homed, but not tens of thousands of them, not when it's hard to sell a well bred, domestic horse at the moment let alone an older feral with limited handling. Culling is required, hate it or love it, it needs to be done.

Killing for fun, well I don't like it. But if it's a clean shot and the animal dies quickly, who am I to complain. So long as it's not an endangered species.
     
    05-10-2012, 12:53 AM
  #27
Trained
Seconded what Kayty said. Brumbies are pests. There is no "some people consider them" about it. The government here culls thousands each year. It's not nice to think that horses are being culled, but we do the same with kangaroos. We have no big predators left in Australia except man. Our ecosystem has evolved with no hard hooved animals, and their introduction has wreaked devastation.
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    05-10-2012, 01:38 AM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiilaa    
Seconded what Kayty said. Brumbies are pests. There is no "some people consider them" about it. The government here culls thousands each year. It's not nice to think that horses are being culled, but we do the same with kangaroos. We have no big predators left in Australia except man. Our ecosystem has evolved with no hard hooved animals, and their introduction has wreaked devastation.
Are those large predators completely extinct, or is there a possibility of reintroducing some of them? I don't know much about Australian wildlife. The biggest ones I can think of are dingos.

I can see why Brumbies are culled, even if I don't like it. Do they use the meat or hides of those animals? You'd think they could at least use the meat for zoo animals. It seems wrong to let it go to waste when they shoot thousands every year.
     
    05-10-2012, 01:49 AM
  #29
Trained
Unfortunately, the location of the brumbies mean that retrieving the corpses is very difficult. Most culls are done with a helicopter and a shooter out the side. Collecting the corpse would waste more resources than it would save

As for predators, the only large one we have is the dingo, and they are the size of a medium sized dog. While they occaisionally form packs, they are more usually found in pairs or alone, so not really able to bring down a horse. Even our one large predator that is now extinct, the Thylacine, was not big enough to bring down a horse. The last Thylacine died in 1936 in captivity. There are rumours always circulating about sightings, but I am not convinced there are any left. (Tasmanian Tiger was another name for the Thylacine).
     
    05-10-2012, 01:50 AM
  #30
Trained
Unfortunately the last 'large' predators we had were back with the dinosaurs! Nothing big enough to take down a horse. Australian wildlife is all quite small and with soft, padded feet. Kangaroos are about the biggest native land animal in Australia. We used to have the 'Tasmanian Tiger', but these were extint years back in the 30's I believe, and they again, were not big enough to take down a horse.

And to be honest, if I was a horse, I'd rather be shot than torn to shreads over a period of time by a predator ;)

ETA: posted at the same time as Chiillaa
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