Should i keep him a stallion? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by ilostmyzipper View Post
How do i know if i should keep him a stallion? My trainer say's not to bother with a stallion and just geld him. I am going to have him showing in the quarter horse halter and western pleasure shows. He has double registered zippo pine bar and joe reed, san pappy and zippo pine glow in his papers. I had a horse with these blood lines before and he was a wonderful horse. Everyone was disapointed that he was gelded, which was done before i bought him. Should i geld him? I'm just not sure what to do. Does anyone have suggestions?
Would you have bought him as a stallion? As others have said, are you prepared to handle a stallion and all that goes with that? If you aren't in the business of breeding, why do you want to get into it?

Think long and hard and then think again. Do you want to ride and enjoy this little guy?... Think about what you want to do. And then I hope you geld him.

Or you can wait awhile and see how he develops. That might give you your answer right there. Not all beautiful foals end up beautifully conformed. They grow wonky... or their temperaments change. That cute little 3 month old foal, becomes a nightmare to handle when the hormones kick in. Or he grows butt high and stays that way. Just cause he's a beautiful foal with nice breeding doesn't mean he isn't gelding material. The world needs far more nice geldings than it does stallions.
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post #12 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 09:11 AM
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He would make the most beautiful gelding.

Stallion not so much.
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post #13 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 09:15 AM
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Just reading your post OP, I'd have to agree with your trainer and geld him in good conscience knowing he will have a much happier...and normal life. It takes subtle handling to keep a stallion, and it is not for someone with little or no experience at it. I've worked with stallions in the past and got complacent over time with dangerous results. With (most not all) stallions it only takes one time when your concentration slips for bad things to happen.

Beside the daily handling issue, there is the fact that special fencing is required, and that unless you have the money to go to rated shows 100% of the time most local amateur shows don't allow the showing of studs with good reason.
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post #14 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 10:00 AM
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He is a nice looking foal but his bloodlines aren't rare that would make one think they need to be preserved by using him as a stud. If you kept him a stallion you would be sentencing him to a life of being seperated from other horses and being banned from most group rides and local shows. You would also have to be able to sink thousands upon thousands of dollars in him to promote him and show him with no gaurantee that he will even do well in the top shows.

Make yours and his life simpler and geld him. Enjoy him and let him be a good reliable horse.

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post #15 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 10:00 AM
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Any good stallion would make a great gelding.

There are literally thousands of stallions in the AQHA today that are double registered, have similar breeding and are just as, if not more, talented than your colt. He is a real cutie, I will not deny that, but I can say from experience that it is not worth keeping a stallion these days unless you have one of the "politically popular" trainers backing you. You will spend more time either breeding him to grade mares to make a buck or turning down every yahoo you talk to than you will even talking to the owners of the kind of mares (well built, well bred, solid show record) that you should breed him to.

It takes a crazy amount of time, money, and devotion to accommodate, campaign, advertise, and maintain a stallion. I, too, owned a great gelding that I had people go "oh man, I wish he was a stud, he has great blah blah blah," but I had the eye and experience with breeding to just thank them. Then I would look at my little horse, who had no fad bloodlines, a modest show record, and minor issues with his legs that most people will not notice on a gelding but would have ripped apart on a stallion, and I would be glad that I had such a super little buddy of a horse.
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post #16 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 10:36 AM
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Your colt is stacked to the hilt with outstanding QH bloodlines and is an extremely handsome baby, but just those qualities do not make his being kept an intact stallion a favorable choice in today's economy status. Plus in the State where I live there is specific housing laws regarding Stallions. It takes alot of $$$ to promote a breeding stallion and sometimes the returns are not near enough to cover the costs of keeping a breeding stud. Then maybe your not even thinking on keeping your colt as a breeding stud. In that case, you'd still be faced with the housing and limitations where stallions are welcomed.

I once happened to be at my Vet's Clinic just as he was finishing doing a gelding of a very nice colt that had one descended testicle and the other one was located up near a kidney and had to be gelded. In talking with the colt/gelding's owner just after the surgery he said he had hoped to keep the colt intact, but nature just wasn't in his favor. The owner's next comment was, "I don't have the great stallion I thought I wanted, but I have an even more outstanding gelding".

There are Halter Classes for Geldings and most geldings are shown in Western Pleasure as well as mares.

Best Wishes and Good Thoughts in your decision making to geld or not to geld.
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post #17 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 11:07 AM
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I had the pleasure of owning my own stallion for a few years, he was the easiest guy to be around to handle, but at the same time he was all boy.

The day I sold him I cried like a baby because I was going to miss him, and then breathed a huge sigh of relief because life is just so much easier without him around.

As horse people we are always checking that the gates are shut etc, but when you have a stud it's more of a worry.

Geld him and enjoy him, you will both be far happier with your lives
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post #18 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 11:27 AM
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Should you keep him a stallion? The answer to this question is pretty much always "no." This is no exception.
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post #19 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 11:39 AM
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Unless you have large pastures with stallion proof fencing, appropriate companions and several mares you want to breed, geld.

In my experience geldings are much happier, being out with other horses with the option of going out in a herd, as opposed to being in a separate pen, alone. They can trailer with other horses and dont need any special conciderations in a stable.

If you really want to keep him intact dispite the extra hassle, carefully evalutate his conformation and temperment, then start him and show him when he's mature. If he's built exceptionally well, has an exceptional mind and is wildly tallented, go ahead, but it is a huge pain .
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post #20 of 46 Old 06-13-2012, 11:56 AM
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As much as I admire the beauty and fire in a stallion. I have never had any desire to own one.
I bought the best mare I could afford, literally took years, and when I want to breed I get to stallion shop...
much more fun than having your own...LOL

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