-Sigh- this may really be it
 
 

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-Sigh- this may really be it

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    06-19-2010, 10:40 PM
  #1
Banned
-Sigh- this may really be it

So, I received an email early this morning inquiring about Ice....actually, she just requested pictures. I responded in my usual way, sending the link to my photobucket album, as well as some more recent ones as attachments. I also offered to link her to my recent youtube video (warning her of its awfulness) and another one that really showcases how well he moves. I received an email back that actually sounded well put together and thoughtful, asking how his feet were and if he required a lot of upkeep (supplements, chiropractor visits, etc). She did compliment me and say he was gorgeous, but might be too much of a project, and she'd forward him to her trainer. I replied again, asking what she plans on doing with him, and got a very nice, again mature email back saying he'd probably be an EQ, flatwork hunter, and maybe a low level dressage horse. The woman interested in him is middle aged, a mother, and has another OTT horse, so she knows the trials and tribulations of one! I'm relieved that at least this woman seems sane, and might actually be a lead to somewhere, but at the same time I am incredibly anxious/sad about the possibility of sending Ice off to someplace that's not just around the corner (she lives a couple hours away) and never seeing him again.

Great. Now I'm all teary eyed. Stupid ovaries.
     
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    06-20-2010, 12:17 AM
  #2
Foal
Hey, look on the bright side, the woman seems really nice and she has experience so Ice won't be worked into the ground or abused. Be happy that Ice can move onto bigger things and learn new things. There's nothing wrong with keeping in contact with the woman to check up on him, a lot of people do that with sold horses. Chin up.
     
    06-20-2010, 12:24 AM
  #3
Weanling
It's hard selling and saying good bye to a horse, but you have to be happy that this person seems to actually have a brain and a sense of what OTTBs are like. She sounds like she would stay in contact with you, and the fact that she has a trainer who is helping her make the decision is very good! You need someone who is thoughtful like this woman is for Ice, it sounds like a great home for him. I have read some of your posts about him, and he definitely deserves a very special and happy home, and if this is it then I'm happy for him.

It doesn't make it easy though. I free leased a horse last summer that was sold after I finally got Bali out here. I saw the woman who owned him last night in the grocery store and she told me she finally sold him to a wonderful home where he's working cattle on a real ranch HOURS from the small barn I was riding him at that had a trainer that was trying to make him into a dressage horse. He's much happier and even though it's hard knowing I'll never see him again, at least he's happy... you know?
     
    06-20-2010, 12:37 AM
  #4
Banned
It's never easy to let a horse go. Smoke was the first real horse I had ever rode (I'm exculding the pony rides at the fairs brfore my first riding lesson). Although I only rode him once in my life, I bawled my eyes out when my riding instructor sold him a year later. He was 22, and his competitive barrel career was wearing him down. But I saw him a few months back with his 7 year old owner and he looked as good as ever. And he was happy. He is on a drill team and takes his little girl on rides around her farm. It was hard to see him go, but he is shaping another horse crazy kid into an experienced rider. And that is just as good as if he was still at the barn.
     
    06-20-2010, 03:04 AM
  #5
Weanling
Awww. ***Hugs***

Good for you for trying to what is best for Ice.
     
    06-20-2010, 12:35 PM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlmostThere    
Awww. ***Hugs***

Good for you for trying to what is best for Ice.
Thats the thing, he's such a bugger that his looks and his personality under saddle could sell him, but his personality on the ground could be a deal breaker. I'd hate for them to, 90 days in, discover his honeymoon periods over and he's a little bit more horse than they thought and then want to get rid of him.

I'm completely in this for the long haul if I am to keep him....I'm not trying to sell him because I'm afraid of a little bit of hard work, since he's been for sale since before all of this started. Unfortunately, some people are!
     
    06-20-2010, 03:57 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by justsambam08    
Thats the thing, he's such a bugger that his looks and his personality under saddle could sell him, but his personality on the ground could be a deal breaker. I'd hate for them to, 90 days in, discover his honeymoon periods over and he's a little bit more horse than they thought and then want to get rid of him.
Can you keep yourself in a position to take him back if it doesn't work out with a buyer? You know, a first right of refusal sort of thing written into the contract. You'd have to keep yourself from buying another horse for a few months just to be sure they made it through the honeymoon period, though.
     
    06-20-2010, 04:32 PM
  #8
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlmostThere    
Can you keep yourself in a position to take him back if it doesn't work out with a buyer? You know, a first right of refusal sort of thing written into the contract. You'd have to keep yourself from buying another horse for a few months just to be sure they made it through the honeymoon period, though.
I honestly doubt I'd get another one for awhile anyway, just because I wouldn't be able to afford it. If she bought him, the money would go to paying my car insurance, paying my dad back for paying my cell phone bill, and probably paying down my credit card significantly. The rest would go into savings. If I continue working at the barn, I'd be able to keep a stall open for him, or for any horse that I may buy in the future (saving a stall is only 200 dollars a month). The problem is I would then also not be able to give them a refund.

But my fear is that it will end up just like that other horror stories we've seen on this board recently.
     

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