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Sister's friend wants to ride horse

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        10-03-2013, 04:16 PM
      #21
    Started
    Lets see,

    1) not a beginners/childs horse. This person is a beginner/.child. That rules it out right there.

    2) rider too large for the horse.

    If you don't want to bring up the weight issue, just say the horse is not suitable. My BO and I were in a similar situation. Girl was 17, desperately wanted to ride, but weighed 300+ lb. Only horse on the farm that could carry her was an intermediate horse, which she was adamant she could handle. In short, she made a stupid decision, inadvertently cued for a canter, and being so large, she didn't have the muscle tone or ability to keep herself on. She hurt her ankle.

    I'm not thin, and struggle all the time with weight, but I would never think of getting on a horse at 300# and in horrible physical shape. That's not fair, and I think people need to realize that horse back riding requires work for the person. If you want to mountain bike, be good at ballet, run a marathon, or hike to a mountain top, you have to work up to it. You don't just jump into it with no endurance, cardio or muscle tone. You don't say "I never do anything, I want to be a mountain climber, lets go climbing" and expect it to go well. You go to your local park and start walking. You research, buy the right gear, walk a few miles, then 10 miles, then up long hills. Eventually you actually are prepared enough to go for a climb.

    Riding is like that. You buy the right gear, start getting in shape. It requires flexibility, coordination and core strength. You don't walk up to someone, say "hey, I know your relative, can I use your very expensive horse and tack for free while your not there?" The idea is ridiculous.
         
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        10-03-2013, 04:44 PM
      #22
    Green Broke
    I wouldn't let her ride the horse, but if she was over visiting your sister sometime I'd invite her out to pat him over the fence, feed him a carrot. I don't think that would do any harm, and I know as a kid even that would have made my day. You're not obligated to, but it doesn't hurt to be nice and kind.
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        10-03-2013, 08:41 PM
      #23
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BlueSpark    
    lets see,

    1) not a beginners/childs horse. This person is a beginner/.child. That rules it out right there.

    2) rider too large for the horse.

    If you don't want to bring up the weight issue, just say the horse is not suitable. My BO and I were in a similar situation. Girl was 17, desperately wanted to ride, but weighed 300+ lb. Only horse on the farm that could carry her was an intermediate horse, which she was adamant she could handle. In short, she made a stupid decision, inadvertently cued for a canter, and being so large, she didn't have the muscle tone or ability to keep herself on. She hurt her ankle.

    I'm not thin, and struggle all the time with weight, but I would never think of getting on a horse at 300# and in horrible physical shape. That's not fair, and I think people need to realize that horse back riding requires work for the person. If you want to mountain bike, be good at ballet, run a marathon, or hike to a mountain top, you have to work up to it. You don't just jump into it with no endurance, cardio or muscle tone. You don't say "I never do anything, I want to be a mountain climber, lets go climbing" and expect it to go well. You go to your local park and start walking. You research, buy the right gear, walk a few miles, then 10 miles, then up long hills. Eventually you actually are prepared enough to go for a climb.

    Riding is like that. You buy the right gear, start getting in shape. It requires flexibility, coordination and core strength. You don't walk up to someone, say "hey, I know your relative, can I use your very expensive horse and tack for free while your not there?" The idea is ridiculous.
    Good points. Non horse people don't understand that yes, it does take strength, balance, and coordination. Sure, riding will get you more fit, but you have to be in decent shape to begin with.
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        10-04-2013, 04:44 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    Another good point was made, that everyone is so sue happy these days... It would just take one accident (while you're not even there!) to put you in a sticky situation. Not everyone is like that, but it's better to be safe than sorry!
         
        10-04-2013, 09:40 PM
      #25
    Foal
    Based on what you have said about your horse, I think it is a potentially very dangerous situation. Since she doesn't have experience, your horse may be physically/mentally uncomfortable, and you wouldn't be there to supervise, it just seems like a potential recipe for disaster. I think there are certain ways to handle the situation that would be polite and safe. For example, perhaps she could pet the horse or give it treats or something like that instead of riding necessarily. Sometimes people think horseback riding is much simpler than it is so they think it is simple to just sort of hop on. Also, I feel the same way about letting people on my horse. I used to let my one friend who used to do riding camp hop on my horse and take her around but then I eventually told her she could not do that any longer because I put my horse in training and it just wasn't a good situation at the time. I am now much more selective about who gets on my horse, and if I do let someone get on that doesn't have a lot of experience, I set the rules very carefully and make sure that the situation is under control.
         
        10-04-2013, 09:55 PM
      #26
    Trained
    I think you made the correct choice
    You were not rude just honest
    And your sister has to go with your choice
         
        10-05-2013, 01:34 AM
      #27
    Started
    Could you help your sister find a good lesson barn that she could go to? You should have a good sisterly chat. Tell her why, give examples that she will understand, and also offer to be the good big sister and help find another option.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        10-05-2013, 01:19 PM
      #28
    Foal
    My horse fits the whole "don't even pet/touch him"
    If your near his back like your going to put a saddle on, he will attempt to bite. For that reason, no one but me and my trainer get him from the field.
    My horse is NOT for a beginner in any way, shape, or form. He's 17 too and WILL take off with someone who doesn't know what they are doing, and I have had plentyyy of people say they can ride (including a 10 year old city kid who proved himself wrong by walking underneath him!)
    My suggestion would be lunging him with her on if your going to let her ride at all. I would say if you let her ride at least once the risk of them riding with you not there would be less (possibly)
    Either that or make it VERY clear that he is NOT for her to ride, I lock my tack up as an extra precaution. With the farm I board at being an auto repair shop as well, there are always more people coming and going.
    Hope nothing bad comes out of your situation!
         

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