Sold my horse after a series of small and unfortunate events
   

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Sold my horse after a series of small and unfortunate events

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  • What horse got spooked in his stall and almost died

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    06-22-2012, 02:14 PM
  #1
Weanling
Sold my horse after a series of small and unfortunate events

So this last week has not been the best for my boy Vin. It started with a calm evening ride that ended with him spooking, I calmed him down and thankfully got him under control, but scared me enough to not want to ride again. Then we were walking in the arena and he ate a plastic flower and took off at a dead sprint across the arena to get away from me. Scared me that he could actually go that fast. Again, got the situation under control and continued with our work. Took him in round pen 3 nights ago and I felt like I was in the eye of the hurricane......while he did everything that was asked beautifully, he just did it with so much power and speed....even his walk was fast and animated. He is an Arabian and when I bought him, he was pretty underweight with some major hoof issues going on, but he was so calm and weekly behaved. I was sold the minute the big dog ran up and started jumping and barking in his face and he did nothing. He still has fantastic ground manners, and is a favorite of both the vet and the farrier. But the final straw was when one of the barn employees was walking him back to his stall, he spooked at the mounting block and reared up and nearly fell over backwards. Scared the man half to death because he's never done anything like that. I just thought there is no way I can ever trust him around my kids, even just leading him can turn into a disaster. This is a horse that was so calm 3 months ago, they talked about using him as a lesson horse. Could this change in him be due to the fact that he is now a healthy horse and finally feels really good and wants to get out and go go go? Am I making a rash decision??? Safety is my number 1 priority, I don't want anyone getting hurt by him. He is going to a more experienced home with a young lady in her 20s that knows his vices and will treat him well. Anyone have experience with this type of thing? I'm just so confused about the last couple of weeks.....

Cookies and muffins to those who read this novel (or beer and pizza if your old enough;)
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    06-22-2012, 02:27 PM
  #2
Started
It doesn't sound like he's the right horse for you, but does sound like he needs some training done. My rescue was underweight and almost dead when we got her. After reviving her we got a sassy misbehaved girl that has taken serious training to become the good girl she is now. If there is only room in your life for one horse, passing him on to a family that can give him what he needs is the best bet, and begin carefully shopping for something that works for your family.
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    06-22-2012, 02:32 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kelli    
Could this change in him be due to the fact that he is now a healthy horse and finally feels really good and wants to get out and go go go? Am I making a rash decision??? Safety is my number 1 priority, I don't want anyone getting hurt by him. He is going to a more experienced home with a young lady in her 20s that knows his vices and will treat him well. Anyone have experience with this type of thing? I'm just so confused about the last couple of weeks.....

Cookies and muffins to those who read this novel (or beer and pizza if your old enough;)
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Yep, he feels better and was never finished. "Finished" in MY dictionary, means that a beginner will always have a good ride/experience. Sounds like it wasn't a good match. It also sounds like you don't realize the hours and hours and hours that it takes to get a horse broken in.
I suggest you look for a well trained slowpoke to help you get your confidence built up. Plan on working said new horse a minimum of 5 days/week, better 7 days/week, for at least one hour every workout. Better yet, look for a school horse that can't jump high enough, do barrels well, is too slow--you get the picture.
Owning riding horses is all about a horse that you can depend on. TOO MANY horses are out of the market that have the education of a 2nd grader, yet people want them to perform college algebra (and sometimes, nuclear physics). THEY NEED TIME. Please remember that.
I'm sorry for your loss.
     
    06-22-2012, 02:32 PM
  #4
Yearling
You did the right thing for you. The horse doesnt sound dangerous ,but sounds out of your comfort zone. Yes, the healthy horse brought out his spirit. Arabians are spirited horses, you seem more apt for a QH :)
     
    06-22-2012, 02:36 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Yes! You absolutely cannot judge a horse when they are in poor condition. If they are under weight and in pain of course they are going be less reactive to everything. The more weight they put on and the more issues that are fixed they start to show their true colors.

Where did you get him from? I'm sure this is the reason he ended up in this situation. He probably hurt someone and they left him with no food, water, shelter, etc or dumped him off at the auction for some other poor soul to take on the responsibility of this horse. Now you, as a moral human being, are put in a rough spot. Do you send him to a trainer? Sell him? Or even euthanize him?

Another thing to look into is his diet. Are you loading up on his grain? What kind of hay is he eating? There are a million other questions to be asked and I'm no expert in the matter. A friend skinny horse was put on 10 quarts of senior feed. Let me tell you, for a horse who needed to gain 200 she was a ROCKET SHIP! I QUICKLY squished that.

Also, I hope you did your research. Arabs are typically pretty hot and go go go kind of horses. Not saying all are but that is what they are bred for, long distances at a fast pace in the desert heat. Just about every Arab I have met held true to this. They make great horses for someone who knows how to manage the energy but I probably wouldn't recommend them as a beginner horse in general.
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    06-22-2012, 02:50 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Well I have an Arab that was a rescue. She is still currently needing weight and the first thing the vet told me when advising on her new diet was she will not be the sweet horse you see now. She will become hot and depending how well I did with her training we might see where the weak spots are. But I am completely prepared for this as I wanted a project.

My Arab even now when skinny can go 15 miles on a trail without a second thought. And this is not just a walk. She is slowly starting to feel better and sometimes I just need to get in the arena and let her do her fast trot for a few laps to settle down. When she puts her mind to something, she will do it. They are also a very smart breed.

I think selling was the best for you as you were not prepared for this type of horse. In the future when looking for a horse, do lots of research on the breed you are getting. There's always the exception but breeds aren't sterotyped for nothing.
     
    06-22-2012, 02:56 PM
  #7
Trained
Just as every QH is not beginner friendly, neither is every Arab though some are. It's all in the horses personality and attitude. Sounds like the poor guy was literally starved and now that he's all fed up he's got go and tends to be a little silly and needs an experienced hand. I think it's a good decision to send this one on to someone with more experience and try to find yourself a good been there done that horse of any breed.

I've got a 1/2 Arab like that right now. She's in training to get her started under saddle but she's nervous and from what I can see she's never going to be a dead head. She needs someone who is experienced, calm and either wants to do CTR's or speed events. I wanted a Western Pleasure horse and her father and brother are exactly that, but she's not a never will be. So, she's going to get sold as a project for an experienced horse person.
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    06-22-2012, 03:05 PM
  #8
Weanling
Darn my reply didn't post. We board him at a very reputable barn, he is fed high quality pellets and hay. He is in a training program 5 days a week on top of me working with him 3-5 days a week. I even used him as my lesson horse until this last incident. I bought him from someone that had leased him out as a trail horse. She got him from a trainer (I think). He was originally a wp show horse. He is older, so I am thinking he had a few years where he wasn't used much. I am aware of the trials of owning an Arabian. Initially, my purchase was just going to be for groundwork, I didn't think I would be able to ride anymore because of an injury, but that isn't the case. Also, I should stress, he is more of the spooky scared type and not agressive or dominant. I actually can say he is a doll where people are concerned....but I guess that's how he sucks you in...lol. Thanks for the reassurances.
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    06-22-2012, 04:15 PM
  #9
Green Broke
I've seen many horses go from mild mannered to wild after being regaining their health after a period of neglect. In addition to more training he may just need more work overall. My Arab turns into a spooky butthead if he was worked only 3-5 days a week. Mine needs more like 5-7 days a week of work.
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    06-22-2012, 04:38 PM
  #10
Weanling
Yes DancingArabian, I completely agree with the 5-7 days a week for this horse. My trainer rode him m-f and I lessoned on him on Wednesdays and usually spent thurs- Sunday evenings with him, but if we missed more than 2 days in a row, that's when little things started happening. I was out of town for a family reunion and wedding and when I came back, all of these things happened. I must say, he is a beautiful mover and I can see why he should be in the ring,but he feeds off of my nervousness and that just makes him more jumpy.

For those that have mentioned making sure I do my research and watch feed and such. Thank you for your advice. My trainers (BO and head trainer). Are already looking, they have made calls and are actively helping in my pursuit of a new horse. They are very knowledgeable and have A good reputation for doing what's right.

I am looking forward to finding just the right horse for me and my family.
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