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Teaching beginner lessons.

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        05-02-2010, 02:54 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    So I have another question then - if you're not certified, how do you deal with insurance issues?
         
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        05-02-2010, 02:55 PM
      #22
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MissH    
    So I have another question then - if you're not certified, how do you deal with insurance issues?
    I haven't had to deal with that yet. I won't be dealing with that until after I move to the country.
    And when I am on my own teaching. I have a friend whos going to help me as well. And then a few friends who will help me when she cant
         
        05-02-2010, 03:02 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I find that interesting. And I'm really not trying to pick at this...

    Jessica Jahiel (published author) responds to questions from the public all the time on her site and I love her advice. If you've never heard of her/read any of her stuff, you can find her at Jessica Jahiel's HORSE-SENSE: The Newsletter of Holistic Horsemanship(R).

    That being said, there is a response on her site about this topic exactly. Here are a few excerpts from the one I found most pertinent.
    "Don't think for a minute that you don't need coverage (insurance) if you're just teaching a few local lessons to a few local kids, no matter how close a friendship you have with their parents. In the legal sense, you are either teaching or you are not teaching. There's no such thing as "just teaching a few lessons to a neighbor's kid" -- it's like boarding horses; in terms of legality and liability, you are either boarding or you are not boarding; there's no such thing as "just keeping the neighbor's pony for $50 a month". And if you're teaching, or boarding, at ANY level, you need to be covered."

    "
    If I were just starting out today, I would get insurance before I taught ANY lessons on my own, and I would get certification. EVERY instructor should have both. I hope this isn't too discouraging -- I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but you need to go into this, if you DO go into this, with your eyes wide open. It just isn't simple anymore."

    Are you not worried about a potential liability issue if you teach and aren't insured?
         
        05-02-2010, 03:06 PM
      #24
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MissH    
    I find that interesting. And I'm really not trying to pick at this...

    Jessica Jahiel (published author) responds to questions from the public all the time on her site and I love her advice. If you've never heard of her/read any of her stuff, you can find her at Jessica Jahiel's HORSE-SENSE: The Newsletter of Holistic Horsemanship(R).

    That being said, there is a response on her site about this topic exactly. Here are a few excerpts from the one I found most pertinent.
    "Don't think for a minute that you don't need coverage (insurance) if you're just teaching a few local lessons to a few local kids, no matter how close a friendship you have with their parents. In the legal sense, you are either teaching or you are not teaching. There's no such thing as "just teaching a few lessons to a neighbor's kid" -- it's like boarding horses; in terms of legality and liability, you are either boarding or you are not boarding; there's no such thing as "just keeping the neighbor's pony for $50 a month". And if you're teaching, or boarding, at ANY level, you need to be covered."

    "If I were just starting out today, I would get insurance before I taught ANY lessons on my own, and I would get certification. EVERY instructor should have both. I hope this isn't too discouraging -- I hate to rain on anyone's parade, but you need to go into this, if you DO go into this, with your eyes wide open. It just isn't simple anymore."

    Are you not worried about a potential liability issue if you teach and aren't insured?

    Ok! I never said, I wasn't going to get insured. I would have my instructor the whole time if I did help her this summer.
    I never said, that I shouldnt or anything to be insured. I am going to make sure that is done before I even start. I haven't moved yet so that's why I am getting my instructors certification before I move and I will get insured before I do anything.

    I have been riding for a very very long time. I have taught before at riding camps summer camps I have been a helper at camps at many places I will make sure that I am covered before anything happends.
         
        05-02-2010, 03:12 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Basically, in simpler terms, if you get paid to ride or teach you cannot enter in Amateur divisions. If y ou get paid, you are considered professional. Therefor you can enter in any open classes which doesn't mean the jumps are big. Many open classes are of all heights. :)
    It's a wonderful opportunity you have and I think you should embrace it. Teaching others teaches you a whole heck of a lot.
         
        05-02-2010, 03:14 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    Anyways, my seriousness and concern has obviously killed your enthusiasm and for that, I truly apologize. These are just things one thinks about when they've been around the sport for a while. I do wish you the best of luck and hope that however you go about it, you are successful!
         
        05-02-2010, 03:14 PM
      #27
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by koomy56    
    Basically, in simpler terms, if you get paid to ride or teach you cannot enter in Amateur divisions. If y ou get paid, you are considered professional. Therefor you can enter in any open classes which doesn't mean the jumps are big. Many open classes are of all heights. :)
    It's a wonderful opportunity you have and I think you should embrace it. Teaching others teaches you a whole heck of a lot.
    Right now I don't get paid because all I am doing is helping at voluntering but once I am certified and I am insured and have everything I need then I will start charging money.

    Its just a dream of mine that I have had since I was little. I have many family members who have been horse trainers its apart of me and my blood lol. :)
         
        05-02-2010, 03:16 PM
      #28
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MissH    
    Anyways, my seriousness and concern has obviously killed your enthusiasm and for that, I truly apologize. These are just things one thinks about when they've been around the sport for a while. I do wish you the best of luck and hope that however you go about it, you are successful!
    And I have been around the sport since I was 7 years old. :)

    I do not know what your concerned about when I have said, I would know what to do teaching wise and I know I have to be certified I wouldn't do anything without being certified all I was doing is voluntering so I can alot of exsperience.

    I don't really see the big deal of it.

    What is your concern? When everything you said, I am very aware of? Right now the course I am taking is talking about Liability etc and money fiancing etc.
         
        05-02-2010, 03:52 PM
      #29
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EventersBabe    
    Uhm.
    No actually that doesn't make sense.


    I don't think if I get certified I will get disqualified from shows. Because all I'd be doing is teaching basics of beginner riding. I can still have a riding instructor and everything for myself as well. Plus I don't show that much. So it wouldn't matter.
    Actually yes it can. The SECOND you take money for training or giving lessons you are considered a pro. So you are no longer eligible to compete on Non Pro or ammy competition. You will have to compete against all the other pro trainers. Does not matter if you take $.01 or $1K you are a pro and as such must compete with the pros.
         
        05-02-2010, 04:32 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    It depends what you're competing in and whether or not the shows are rated, actually. I'm an eventer & a jumper, and in high school I found myself riding in the same class as my former trainer several times.

    When you can afford it, which may be after you've already initially certified yourself, I'd strongly recommend looking into getting a British Horse Society certification (yes, you can get that in the States). It's spendy, but very well-respected.
         

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