Thinking of buying a horse?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Thinking of buying a horse?

This is a discussion on Thinking of buying a horse? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Thinking of getting a horse
  • Is it common for people to sedate horses they are selling

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-29-2011, 10:18 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Thinking of buying a horse?

So I'm one of those people who things the whole situation through long before it is actually going to happen (hence the question now and not in a few months)

I'm debating if it is logical, or even possible, for me to get a horse but I can't make up my mind because there are so many questions I have about buying a horse. Sorry this is going to be kind of long

My background:
I've been training dogs and cats almost all my life (worked with a few horses which would be considered green but were very easy to handle and ride)
I've worked at a few barns, one in exchange for lessons, one was volunteer work for a mentally and physically handicapped barn, and one was for an Olympic rider, I did barn chores, groomed the horses, helped with morning and afternoon feed, and turn out/ bring in
That being said, I know very little about horses (am trying to learn) I know grooming, how to clean a stall and some basic basic health things

That all being said I LOVE horses (I'm an animal person) I'm currently going to be going to school for a BMA while taking a few online courses (i know most of you say don't) abut nutrition, health, conformation stuff like that (no courses for training or riding or anything like that) I'm not bothering with and certifications or anything of that sort cus I know that they aren't accredited I just want to get some actual knowledge before I blinding go asking for someone to teach me everything (I think its slightly rude to do so with out at least taking the time to learn some background information before hand)

Anywho, back on track about buying a horse. I really would like to buy my own horse, but being that I've never bought or owned one I know nothing of the things I need to do so here are my concerns:

1) finding a horse
The thought of getting a horse from an auction is appealing to me but with some major downfalls those being will most likely need a ton of training, possible huge vet bills, never know what your getting really, with the only plus that your helping a horse and it doesn't have a huge starting price tag

The other option is to buy a horse from a trainer/dealer/breeder for a larger amount of money upfront but hopefully will cost less in the health department, not have any hidden emotional problems, and all around will more likely end up being a good horse

2) the age of a horse
I'm interested in learning how to to dressage and jumping (for now I'm content with just pleasure riding, working on balance and stuff like that) so age comes into place, while a younger horse may be able to hold up to more harder type riding, it probably will have little to no training, while an older school horse type will already know what to do but will come with a much higher price tag

3) where to put the horse
Then theres the issue of boarding the horse, no way it can live in my non existent back yard. Now I know you need a place for the horse before you buy the horse right? So how does that work if you don't have a place or a horse? Do you find a horse then find a place or find a place then find a horse or perhaps both at the same time? And how do you find a place to keep your horse, I've been in the run down but still well cared for family owned barn and I've been in the supper clean supper stuck up but not so nice to the horses barn, so how do you know what you are getting? Sure you can go and see the place but if they are expecting a potential client how do you know they aren't acting out of the norm just to get you in there? Also if I were to get a horse from auction how would I go about quarantining it from what I hear they don't come with vet check ie no coggins test which is a really bad thing from what I hear. Also how do you decide what type of boarding is right for you?

4) Time
Is it logical to think that while working and going to college that I will have time to go see my horse and possible take lessons on a regular basis? And what is the less amount of time that is acceptable to see your horse? (that sounds bad I don't want it so seem like id buy one and then see it only once a month or something like that, i'm just curious to know. Id go down and see him every second of every day I possibly could haha)

5) money
I'm not rich, never have been and probably never will be. How do you decide that you are financially stable enough to own a horse? And even if you are stable how do you know if you would be able to pay for an emergency that may happen?

6)lessons
Idk if this is the same for every single barn in my area but the ones that have web sites lessons are 65 to 150 a lesson (i know 65 is in the normal range) but that is not something that I can pay for. When I was riding it was 20 a lesson (was half an hour to an hour depending on the day) and I took 2 a week, now I know that the chances of me finding something that cheap are slim to none, but how do you cope with taking lessons in a sport that really is for the rich?

Sorry that this is so long guys i'm really torn up about this, I really want a horse and I really want that to be my career, but I don't want to wait until it is my career to be able to be around them again its been years since I've been in a barn and really miss it. I've thought about this a lot but I haven't been able to find anything to help me make my decisions. So im hoping that peple here with experience will be able to help me make my decision, cus while I really really want a horse, I don't want to put the horse in a bad situation or end up having to resell it because I wasn't ready or able to provide for it. Also any suggested reads would be great too!

Oh one last thing, I don't own a trailer or a truck, I don't know anyone that does or would know anyone that does, how to I get the horse from point A to point B then?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-29-2011, 10:55 PM
  #2
Weanling
Lets start with this one first.
5) money
I'm not rich, never have been and probably never will be. How do you decide that you are financially stable enough to own a horse? And even if you are stable how do you know if you would be able to pay for an emergency that may happen?


Find the avreage board price in your area and start putting that in the bank each month plus what it would caust for shoes. If you find your self having to use that money then you can't pay the board. If you don't use it then you can and you are on your way to haveing the money to purchase a horse.


1) finding a horse
The thought of getting a horse from an auction is appealing to me but with some major downfalls those being will most likely need a ton of training, possible huge vet bills, never know what your getting really, with the only plus that your helping a horse and it doesn't have a huge starting price tag

The other option is to buy a horse from a trainer/dealer/breeder for a larger amount of money upfront but hopefully will cost less in the health department, not have any hidden emotional problems, and all around will more likely end up being a good horse


At least were I am at the market is realy low and lots of good horses are cheep. Auctions are required by law to have coggiens on a horse to sell it. At least were I am from. I do not advice anyone to go to an action with out an naligable friend or trainer to go with you even the high end actions.

2) the age of a horse
I'm interested in learning how to to dressage and jumping (for now I'm content with just pleasure riding, working on balance and stuff like that) so age comes into place, while a younger horse may be able to hold up to more harder type riding, it probably will have little to no training, while an older school horse type will already know what to do but will come with a much higher price tag


Not all older horses mean more money some times people will pay more for the prospect of what the horse can do then a horse already showing you what it can do. I would say for a green rider at least 6 or older to be on the safe side.

4) Time
Is it logical to think that while working and going to college that I will have time to go see my horse and possible take lessons on a regular basis? And what is the less amount of time that is acceptable to see your horse? (that sounds bad I don't want it so seem like id buy one and then see it only once a month or something like that, i'm just curious to know. Id go down and see him every second of every day I possibly could haha)

You can try to work out an arangement with the farm you are baording at if they give lessons to use your horse. This will help you sleep better if you can not get out as much as you want. You know your horse is still getting use.6)lessons
Idk if this is the same for every single barn in my area but the ones that have web sites lessons are 65 to 150 a lesson (i know 65 is in the normal range) but that is not something that I can pay for. When I was riding it was 20 a lesson (was half an hour to an hour depending on the day) and I took 2 a week, now I know that the chances of me finding something that cheap are slim to none, but how do you cope with taking lessons in a sport that really is for the rich?

Get out and drive around. Some of your smaller people may not be on line. Go to shows and ask around. Look in other disaplense they may be cheeper just to get you started.

You may also want to look into leasing a horse. If it is a parshale lease you will have less expence. That could be a good way to get you started.
May I ask were you are at. I would love to help in anyway I can.
     
    04-29-2011, 11:01 PM
  #3
Foal
Raywonk:
Thanks for the reply I feel kind of stupid not thinking of the put the cost of board away every month, that's great advice haha. As for where I am, I am about half an hour north of seatle
     
    04-29-2011, 11:09 PM
  #4
Weanling
Ok I will go threw my friends and see who I know out thier I am on the east coast. I think I know a guy in Washington but I can not think of where. You said you were intrested in english which I started in and love but have crossed over and do both now. I sugest looking at some western barns just for the price side of it. You may find them cheaper. Do you know what breed of horse you would want?
     
    04-29-2011, 11:18 PM
  #5
Foal
I'm clueless about breeds, I love Arabians they are what I worked around for the longest and took lessons on but i'm not dead set on that so open to all suggestions for type of horse. Being papered isn't that big of a deal for me either if I found a grade horse that suited my needs id be fine with that.

I'm 5'2 but am all leg and am petite if that matters at all (but I do like huge horses even if that isn't logical for my size XD)
     
    04-30-2011, 12:01 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Glad to see you're at least putting some thought into it beforehand.

1- Auction? First thing that should come to mind is Why is that horse at the auction? We just went to an auction today, actually the first one I've ever gone to. It was sad. Most of the horses looked thin and almost all had very bad hooves. Yes it would be a cheaper price at first, but you don't know what kind of problems you are getting, health or training.

-Buying outright? You will pay more but you can actually see and work with the horse beforehand. Plan on spending some time with the horse. Some people will mildly sedate the horse when they know someone is coming to look at it. If you spend a few hours there, the sedative would wear off and you can see the true horse. Take someone with you that knows about horses, a trainer or maybe a barn manager, that way you can have somebody that would know what to look for and what to watch out for.

2- For your very first horse, I would suggest at least 10 years old but would say 15 would be better. Since you are learning yourself, why make it harder by adding in teaching the horse also. When you get an understanding of how to work with the horse and know how to ride, then you could get a younger one.

3- Boarding. You'll want to call around beforehand and go to different barns to check them out. You can find out what they offer, how much they charge, and you could talk to the boarders there to find out about what the barn is like. As for getting the horse to there, many barns will go and pick the horse up for you, but you may have to pay a fee for it. Unless you are going to do shows, I would choose a family run barn. Like you said, the upper class show barns seem to be about the show and not the horse or the owner. Th family run ones, I think, offer better care and are willing to work with you if a problem would come up financially. As for the type of boarding is up to you and/or the barn. Some only have stalled horses that are let out daily, some only have outdoor boarding, and some offer either. Personally, I think it is better for the horse, physically and mentally, to have the horse outdoors all the time. When they are stalled, they have more time to do nothing except to develope bad habits. When you visit the barns, let them know that you might be looking at an auction for a horse and then ask them if they would be able to quarantine the horse until the vet check and coggins test. Some won't even let a horse in the barn without a coggins test. You don't say where you are and a coggins is more important someplaces than others. If you were in the southern US, coggins is very important. Here in ND, it's not as important because we hardly ever have any cases of it, unless the horse was shipped here from out of state.

4- Time. How much time can you give the horse? How much time can you set aside for lessons? We only see our horses on the weekends or holidays, but that's fine with us and them. If you want to do shows or compete, you'll have to have more time.

5- Money. The cheapest part of owning a horse is the purchase price, lol. Things to consider: shots once a year(for us about $100/horse), farrier every 8 weeks (us $35 for trim $100 for shoes), floating the teeth (every year or two $100), boarding/month (us $200/horse), worming (we do it same time as farrier so we don't forget $5 to $15 on rotation). Then there is the tack: saddle, pad/blanket, halter, lead rope, bridle and bit, grooming supplies, etc. We are not rich either and have sacrificed things like going out to have the horses.

6- I don't do lessons or have ever taken them. I think they are about $50/ hour here. You could offer the barn or trainer to do work for the lesson in exchange.

Instead of buying a horse now, why not look into leasing a horse for the time being or just take lessons on a barn horse? Just a thought. It would end up cheaper in the short run, at least until you get more financially sound, and have more time and experience. You would still be able to be around horses and learn more about them.
     
    04-30-2011, 01:02 AM
  #7
Foal
Usandpets:
Thanks for the great advice! Now that's I've been thinking about it it makes more since to get a calmer, settled better trained horse who can teach me to ride instead of a younger horse who needs to learn while I learn. Probably not much older that 15 or so, id like him to be around for awhile :). But I don't really know what to look for in a horse or how to find one. Hopefully when I get more serious about buying a horse I will find a barn with someone who will help me in the process
     
    04-30-2011, 01:20 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
Nokeen,

YOu got some nice folks giving you thoughtful answers (some of our nicest posters). I thought I might add that another option is to half lease a horse. There are often people who want $ help, and for half the cost of owning one, you get access to ride it. AND you have the added security of having the owner there for help and support, becuase I would assume they would have more actual hands on experience than you.

If so, find a middle aged horse and a mature, adult owner, and make a clear agreement.
Think about leasing. It cna be a total win-win situation for you and the owner.
     
    04-30-2011, 01:53 AM
  #9
Foal
Also what are your thoughts on buying a cheaper less trained horse and sending them to a trainer? I'm just going through some online ads and everything i'm seeing is either not what i'm looking for or waaayyy out of my price range
     
    04-30-2011, 10:56 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Even if you can buy it cheap, to get a horse trained will cost you. Around here trainers charge up to $800 a month or more, which includes boarding. Don't expect to have the horse trained in one month either, unless it already has some training. If it has no training, I would expect at least 2 or 3 months to have them well started, but not close to fully trained by any means.

Don't limit yourself to just ads online. Check the local paper, and the feed store. They might have a bulletin board with them for sale. When checking out barns to board at, ask if they have any for sale. You can go to an auction and kind of eavesdrop on peolpe there or ask around if anyone has a horse for sale. Check with the trainers at the barns. They may know of somebody trying to sell a horse. Go to tack swap meets or sales and ask around. There are a lot of horses out there that people haven't taken the time to advertise.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thinking of Buying a Belgian QH. My FIRST horse. ?'s Ballardhaus Draft Horses 13 08-18-2010 12:00 AM
Thinking about buying this horse what do you think?? 13kielj Horses for Sale 7 12-31-2009 03:00 PM
horse im thinking about buying. Lonestar22 Horse Riding Critique 4 08-26-2009 10:58 PM
Thinking about buying a horse, need advice manhirwen Horse Health 9 02-11-2009 12:57 PM
Thinking about buying a horse, height? Andi Horses for Sale 2 08-27-2008 12:02 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0