TN Walking Horses - the padded ones.
 
 

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TN Walking Horses - the padded ones.

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  • Padded horse training
  • Padded walking horse history

 
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    12-20-2010, 05:48 PM
  #1
Banned
Red face TN Walking Horses - the padded ones.

Ok, so a thread on another forum made me want to have a CIVIL, EDUCATIONAL debate/discussion on the padded walker. I am fairly new to the forum so I haven't gotten to participate in any of the existing threads.
I have read the threads I could find, and it seems like most people are not very educated on the subject... So that's why I wanted to discuss it. I would really like this to be civil and educate people.... I know, easier said than done. But let's try!

Feel free to give your opinion, and try to use facts. Instead of "I hate them" or "it's so cruel", give a reason or explanation (and be nice!)

For the record, I am against pads, soring, pressure shoeing.... etc etc. I will chime in and give my thoughts
     
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    12-20-2010, 05:57 PM
  #2
Yearling
Rose was one of those horses in her younger years. I just found out all the details a couple of weeks ago. From her training for these shows, the first 2 vertebrae from her skull have been jammed. She has an unusually large chest area from the motion. She also has scarring from micro-tears in her hind quarters from over extention. Not to mention the swelling in her ankles...which will never go completely down...from them cutting her tendons so she would have "that" motion.

I was told when I bought her that she used to be a show horse, but I thought it was in the flat shod classes. I was wrong. I LOVE my girl dearly. But I'm looking at years of problems. She's now 17, and one of the sweetest horses that I've ever had the pleasure of knowing. So, even though I'm looking at many expensive vet bills, there is NO WAY I would ever get rid of her. She deserves the best of care.

So, I personally am very AGAINST the padded showing.
     
    12-20-2010, 06:14 PM
  #3
Showing
I don't see the purpose of it. Sure, it looks flashy to the uneducated (or brainwashed) eye but really it is so hard on those horses. For them to be competitive, they have to be in almost constant pain from the soring, pressure shoeing, and the wear and tear caused by the motion itself. It is impossible for them to carry that much of their weight back on their hocks without doing damage to those joints and the tendons around it.

Imagine how our normal horses react when they get a rock lodged in their hoof. They limp, right? Now imagine a horse with half of a golf ball trapped between their hoof and the pads on both front feet, coupled with heavy chains on top of caustic liquids that are burning the skin off their pasterns. Of course they will lift their front legs to the sky, they are trying to step out of/away from the things that are causing them such agony.

It's hard to have a civilized conversation about this because the discipline itself is completely uncivilized and barbaric. There is nothing in the horse world that will turn my stomach quite like watching a "Big Lick" TWH in the ring.

I don't know what it is about we humans that causes us to contort and pervert something natural and beautiful into a grotesque oddity just to keep everyone looking at us. *shakes head in disgust*
     
    12-20-2010, 06:20 PM
  #4
Showing
Against it. It seems to be one way of training that's unfaillably cruel every time....makes my stomach turn, especially when it really isn't even aesthetically pleasing.
     
    12-20-2010, 11:50 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
I don't know what it is about we humans that causes us to contort and pervert something natural and beautiful into a grotesque oddity just to keep everyone looking at us. *shakes head in disgust*
Smrobs hit the nail on the head with this line.
     
    12-21-2010, 12:09 AM
  #6
Showing
Nice line, smrobs!
     
    12-21-2010, 12:15 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
Could you explain to me what this pads is? I know that a lot of nasty stuff is done to the gaited horses to make them move all wierd, but I don't know the details. Maybe that's a blessing, no?
     
    12-21-2010, 12:20 AM
  #8
Banned
While I do agree that some Big Lick walkers are mistreated...I still find that there is a bit of bad in every discipline/breed.

I have ridden former and current Big Lick walkers. The ones I had contact with were treated like royalty, had personalities bigger than life and other than shoe stacks, they were never subjected to soring and other painful procedures. These horses even carried a natural tail. No sets, no surgery. They were also big time winners. They had the Big Lick, over the shoulder, crouched down gait...they just got that particular gait the right way. Slowly, with training.

While the gait isn't natural, there are other gaits in the horse world that are not natural. The trope, the over collected trot, the over extended trot. None of those gaits would be exhibited by the normal horse in a normal every day pasture setting.

Think of it this way. Big Lick is the Anky of Tennessee Walking horses. One bad seed that has made the breed/discipline look much worse than it is. Not every dressage horse has been trained with Rollkur...just like every walker has not been sored.

I love gaited horses. I feel that they get a bad reputation because of people rushing a horse through training and taking short cuts. It bothers me that people assume all walkers have some sort of nasty history.
     
    12-21-2010, 03:14 PM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
While I do agree that some Big Lick walkers are mistreated...I still find that there is a bit of bad in every discipline/breed.
And this arguement always drives me nuts. Yes, there are bad apples in every breed/discipline. But the difference there is that they are the minority. In the WH show industry, it's more the opposite... the good guys trying to do right and have truly sound horses are more the minority.
This arguement is null to me.

I have ridden former and current Big Lick walkers. The ones I had contact with were treated like royalty, had personalities bigger than life and other than shoe stacks, they were never subjected to soring and other painful procedures. These horses even carried a natural tail. No sets, no surgery. They were also big time winners. They had the Big Lick, over the shoulder, crouched down gait...they just got that particular gait the right way. Slowly, with training.
Were you around all the time? Do you know for certain they didn't have anything at all influencing that big movement? Lots of trainers have all different definitions of "sound".
There are plenty of trainers who "fix" the horses during the week, and then "sound" them back up at the end of the week/weekend.... so the owners may not even know what their horse is going through if they don't come out Mon/Tue/Wed/Thur to see the "training".

While the gait isn't natural, there are other gaits in the horse world that are not natural. The trope, the over collected trot, the over extended trot. None of those gaits would be exhibited by the normal horse in a normal every day pasture setting.

Think of it this way. Big Lick is the Anky of Tennessee Walking horses. One bad seed that has made the breed/discipline look much worse than it is. Not every dressage horse has been trained with Rollkur...just like every walker has not been sored.

I know and never said that every walker has been sored. But in the showing aspect, it's certainly the majority.

I love gaited horses. I feel that they get a bad reputation because of people rushing a horse through training and taking short cuts. It bothers me that people assume all walkers have some sort of nasty history.
I love gaited horses, too. I will always have a QH, but my breed of choice for trail riding is a SSH or WH... And yes, they do have a bad rep. Because a lot of padded horse trainers do take shortcuts, and ride 16-18 month olds and all but ruin lots of nice little horses... all for the sake of glory and money. :roll:
     
    12-21-2010, 03:47 PM
  #10
Banned
Ok, first you said that you wanted a calm, no mud slinging argument but you seem to be the one to get argumentative.

Are you saying that Plantation walking horses are sored? How about easy gaited classes? To my knowledge only Big Lick horses are sored, and even then, Big Lick competitions have caught enough scrutiny and have been shut down. I am not saying that the abuse doesn't happen...I am just saying that the gait they are looking for in Big Lick classes can be TAUGHT. It doesn't need to be MADE.

I was at that barn 6 days a week as I worked there as a Stable Hand and exercise rider. I held horses while they were being shod. I rode, I cleaned stalls, I was there. There was nothing out of the ordinary going on there.

Horses were ridden 6 days a week. They were started at 2. They were taught slow, consistent gaits first. Rollers were added to emphasize the stride. The shoes were built up slowly. Week by week. The gait was developed there. If a horse didn't have what it took to bring out the big gait, they were either shown in other classes or sold as a trail horse.

I have made this point before and will continue to make it. Say there are 100K TWH right now. 1% of them will become Big Lick horses. 2% will be trained to do the gait. Of that 1%, 50% will have suffered some sort of abuse. So a half of a percent will have shown Big Lick and never been sored or abused. Would I rather see that the abuse never happens in the first place. ABSOLUTELY. I am not for soring or hurting horses.

With that 1% in mind, lets just assume that every one of those horses is limping lame by say...age 15. I see by your avatar you are a jumper. How many jumpers, competitive hard jumpers, are sound after age 15. Without injections?

How about TB's? How many are started as long yearlings, raced until they either don't have the heart or they break down? Then add in that OTTB's have become a very popular mount for high impact riding styles such as Jumpers and Dressage. How many of *those* horses are sound after 15?

How about Reiners? Many of them are started at 2, ridden in futurities and such. Campaigned hard and then sold off. How many reiners, true competitive reiners are sound after 15?

You see? You can make this argument with every discipline.

All showing is done in the name of glory and money. Racing, Reining, jumping, Dressage, Western pleasure. All about the money and the glory. TWH aren't the only ones in the game you know.
     

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