Trying hard to not "make waves" at new barn but...what do you do in this situation?
   

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Trying hard to not "make waves" at new barn but...what do you do in this situation?

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    06-02-2012, 12:47 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Unhappy Trying hard to not "make waves" at new barn but...what do you do in this situation?

So, today as many of you know, I moved Cinny to a new barn. Things are going great but I already had to bite my tongue today even though I saw something horrifyingly dangerous...

I was riding in the arena at the time, and this girl was REALLY FRUSTRATED by the her horse and the trainer's father (who I can't figure out if he's a trainer too or if he thinks he's a trainer too, anyway) had come in and saw her and gave her an impromptu lesson (more like a barking at) to try to help which almost brought the girl to tears. From talking to her I know that her horse is an OTTB who has been off the track only a year. She is also a green rider and 10yo at that. And what she had on that horse made me CRINGE...and the trainer's dad said nothing, and apparently doesn't know that it's dangerous. She was using a mechanical hackamore WITHOUT a curb AND it also didn't have the attachment at the bottom either causing the shanks to move individually. So when she pulled on the reins, the shanks just moved up and it did...NOTHING.

One of these... (without the piece connecting the shanks on the bottom)
bit-25-5108.jpg


Am I wrong thinking this is dangerous? I mean on ANY horse, but this is a young, green rider on an OTTB that has only had a year off the track. The horse looked mellow and safe, but I know I wouldn't dare try to ride Cinny like that. How could she stop it if it spooked and took off with her or something? And he kept barking at her about lack of control on the horse (at a walk) and yet... why didn't he correct her tack? I felt like telling them, but I have a feeling that these people do NOT want you interfering with THEIR students in any way. So I kept my mouth shut and just grumbled at Robo when we got home about it (he was there too).

I feel like asking the trainer herself if there is a reason the girl is using that hackamore in that way...but can't think of a way of asking it without sounding impertinent or like a "Know it all." And yet, I'm afraid not to mention it too... what would you do in this situation?
     
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    06-02-2012, 01:15 AM
  #2
Trained
You could ask nicely....You could say "Hey, I just noticed this hackamore didn't have the pieces I am used to seeing on them, can you explain it to me?" Or you could approach the parent and offer to help, like "I have an idea that might help, do you mind?" That is how things would normally work at our barn.
     
    06-02-2012, 01:18 AM
  #3
Yearling
Do you ever see her parents? I might print out a website page that shows a correct hackamore setup, and just give it to them and tell them the hackamore their daughter has is missing the pieces needed for it to function correctly. Maybe they are simply unaware of this.

Alot of parents that have no horse knowledge rely on the trainers to keep their kids safe and their horses learning - if it comes back to you, offer apologies to the "trainer" - (sorry, I didn't realize you would be offended that I pointed out a tack problem...) and keep the tone light.

Good luck :)
     
    06-02-2012, 01:18 AM
  #4
Trained
It's not dangerous so much as it's completely ineffective. A curb bit or hackamore without a curb strap is not doing its job properly, which will lead to a lack of proper cues and control in addition to confusion for the horse. The curb strap provides the resistance needed to exert the leverage that curb bits are used for. Without one, they are not doing the job they are intended to do.

The piece at the bottom is more so that shanks don't collapse upon themselves and pinch either the mouth or the nose. You can move the shanks of a curb individually either way.
     
    06-02-2012, 01:43 AM
  #5
Green Broke
I'm not worried so much about the mom, she's cool. It's the trainer... I can tell that she's one of those types that if the student asks her if I'm right or if the trainer notices a change and questions it and they say I told them it was wrong, then this trainer, who is the BO will most likely get upset that I interfered with her students.

As for the danger, I think having something ineffective on a green OTTB being ridden by a very novice 10 yo makes it dangerous.
     
    06-02-2012, 09:46 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Just bumping up :)
     
    06-02-2012, 10:15 AM
  #7
Foal
I would tell her that she would get better results if her hackamore had a curb.

Even though I haven't had a 'real' lesson in over four years, I did have a trainer like that. She was right all the time, and she would get really upset if someone told her she was doing things bass ackwards.

It might make her mad, but the safety of someone should come first. Feeling like you have no control of a horse sucks too, so it would probably make that little girls lessons so much better if you did at least ask her why she was riding with a hackamore like that.
stephshark likes this.
     
    06-02-2012, 10:45 AM
  #8
Started
Hello there. I agree with the methods that others have suggested to put forward your opinion, but I'm going to offer an alternative viewpoint.

If you're new there, and want to settle in quietly, I think you should keep your views firmly to yourself. Yes, they are doing it wrong, yes it could be done better, but that situation happens around us all the time, and sometimes you just have to let it go. If you start offering your opinions on what others are doing in your first fortnight there I think someone is going to be offended however tactfully you do it.

If it were me I would tell myself - the mother is an adult, the trainer is an adult, THEY are the ones in charge of this 10 year old, not me. Not My Business.

I know it's frustrating, but the horsey world is so full of know-it-all's that people can so often resent interference no matter how well-meant. Settle in at your barn, focus on your horse, and make friends. Maybe leave this particular battle to be someone elses.
     
    06-02-2012, 11:00 AM
  #9
Yearling
Do you have one properly outfitted? If so maybe make it a point to show the parent a proper set up.

Offer a missing piece if you have one, innocently. "Hey I noticed you didn't have your strap on. I have an extra if you want it." And explain the brace at the bottom can be made of any heavy gauge wire, or make an "extra" for yourself and have it in your tack box with the curb.... even an old buckle and a piece of broken rein can make a good strap.

If possible I'd offer them in front of the "trainer" in a helpful manner. This would passively put her on the spot and give the parent recourse if something happens to that child because they are using unsafe/incomplete equipment during her lessons.
     
    06-02-2012, 11:02 AM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shropshirerosie    
Hello there. I agree with the methods that others have suggested to put forward your opinion, but I'm going to offer an alternative viewpoint.

If you're new there, and want to settle in quietly, I think you should keep your views firmly to yourself. Yes, they are doing it wrong, yes it could be done better, but that situation happens around us all the time, and sometimes you just have to let it go. If you start offering your opinions on what others are doing in your first fortnight there I think someone is going to be offended however tactfully you do it.

If it were me I would tell myself - the mother is an adult, the trainer is an adult, THEY are the ones in charge of this 10 year old, not me. Not My Business.

I know it's frustrating, but the horsey world is so full of know-it-all's that people can so often resent interference no matter how well-meant. Settle in at your barn, focus on your horse, and make friends. Maybe leave this particular battle to be someone elses.
You know what, well said... I think this is probably what I need to do. Just "let it go." That is the hardest thing for me to do (I'm a bit OCD) but maybe I should just put it from my mind and as I tell my dogs "leave it." LOL.

I keep hearing this girl plans to show at the county fair coming up... I am sure that she won't be let into the ring like that OR the judges will say something about the tack so I should just let these other authorities clue them in and just relax and make friends.
texasgal and Rascaholic like this.
     

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