URGENT:prospective buyer visit tommorrow
 
 

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URGENT:prospective buyer visit tommorrow

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  • Buyers i am urgent
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    03-24-2012, 06:55 AM
  #1
Foal
Question URGENT:prospective buyer visit tommorrow

Hi guys - Just wondering if you could give me some advice surrounding my gelding and his sale. What do I talk to the buyers about ....and how do I go about selling this gelding to them in the best possible light ?

I have had him up for sale and had given my self a time limit on him being sold if he wasnt sold within a certain time he would be shipped to a place in central qld to be trained and then bought back to me to sell. I was not expecting him to be of interest straight away and am unprepared. Help!!!!!
     
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    03-24-2012, 07:06 AM
  #2
Foal
Be accurate, honest and fair.
     
    03-24-2012, 08:43 AM
  #3
Foal
When I was looking at horses, I really liked the owners that were very forthright and honest with me. Good and bad. Then they rode the horse, went over any questions I had and then I rode the horse. If your horse has any quirks or does anything a bit different let them know before they ride. If you like them, tell them to go home and think about it and invite them to come see him again in the next day or two.
     
    03-24-2012, 09:20 AM
  #4
Started
Be honest!!! That's the key. Let them know the real reasons you are selling , any bad habits or quirks, the things he is good at, if you are scared to ride him for the prospective buyers find someone who can ride him/handle him to show him off properly.
Otherwise just be personable and you should be fine.
     
    03-24-2012, 11:05 AM
  #5
Yearling
I'm currently looking for a horse, and what I really respects as a buyer is honesty. I've been dealing with some not so honest sellers, or people who don't tell me there's an issue until I get there (one of which was 2 hours away from me.) I wasn't happy with the things that I found with these horses, but the fact that the owners were dishonest had me making my decision to move on very quickly.

Best of luck selling your horse!!
     
    03-24-2012, 11:14 AM
  #6
Started
If you were honest in the add, I think the biggest thing is, as was said, be completely honest, but focus on the good. I was at a sellers who was really honest, but focused on the negitive traits. I had the ability to fix the things he was so negitive about, and I really liked the look of the horse and the price was right, so I bought her. He focused on how hard she was to catch, but the first time I went to catch her she ran up to me and put her head in the halter. His way off selling would have turned many buyers off unnessessarily.

Be honest but possitive, with the goal of finding a home where both your horse and the new owners are happy.
     
    03-24-2012, 11:45 AM
  #7
Yearling
I agree. As a buyer, more than seller, I want to know both the good and the bad. It also helps to know what the seller's needs are - in other words, why the horse isn't suitable for the seller. Maybe not a good potential for jumping, for instance, or just needs to thin the herd. Then, I would want to know why this one made the cut to be sold and not another in the herd.

We recently shopped for a pony - we walked away from an awesome pony where he had recently been shod with a shifty story. We felt there was probably something we weren't being told and walked away from what may have been a perfect pony for us.

The one we ended up buying was hard for the owner to catch, and they didn't 'click.' She was really focused on that, and I felt like there must have been some other reason why he was for sale. However, other than the fact that he has to be kept up on a dry lot, I never figured out what it was. I think I ended up with a great pony. I personally am good at teaching horses to be caught and on our first day home that pony turned into a pocket pony. So far, he's perfect for us, but if she hadn't been totally forthcoming about what she didn't like, I would have assumed that there was something else wrong.
     
    03-24-2012, 12:08 PM
  #8
Started
A good example would be my horse I just sold. I could have said she was extremely spooky, Which would have been honest, but negitive.

Instead I marketed her as needed a faster paced job(she stopped spooking when she was doing a fast trot+) and being quick on her feet and attentive to her surroundings, which was also honest. When the buyers came out I explained how she spooks, I rode her and then the buyer rode her. They got to see how she spooks, and also that she was attentive to her rider and didn't go crazy. The spooking doesnt faze them and she gets to start a new career as a games horse.
Ladytrails likes this.
     
    03-24-2012, 12:13 PM
  #9
Yearling
BlueSPark, exactly! What is spooky for me might be 'high strung' and 'energetic' to another! I also found that there is no 'standard' for what is broke, green broke, finished, etc. It's best to say what the horse has been doing or exposed to, and let the buyer decide what level of 'trained' that means to them.
     
    03-24-2012, 01:11 PM
  #10
Yearling
As other had said, honesty here is the best policy. If the horse isn't at a level for a beginner or intermediate rider, let them know if they bring an 8 yr old just learning to ride. Be honest about "heat" level. This won't necesarily turn off a buyer if they are comfortable handling energy but it is irresponsible to make a horse seem more placid than they actually are.

AS also indicated, ride the horse before the prospective buyer. THis gives them a chance to see the ground movement and gaits prior to getting on..it helps YOU determine if the horse is safet o ride. For example, I went to see a fantastic dressage and hunter prospect. THe seller got on the horse and he was great on the flat...I was all ready to get on when the barn manager (also the sellikng agent) had the rider jump him for me. THis horse had been advertised as push button over fences. THe rider trotted hinm over a crossrail and when he landed, he took one stride, planted his feet and bucked off the rider. After remounting the horse refused two more jumps and dumped the rider a second tiume. At that point, the barn manager wouldn't let anyone get on him until they made a determination as to what was going on. I noticed they had dropped his price by a quarter the day after I saw him and three months later he still hasn't sold.
     

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