Want to buy a weanling
 
 

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Want to buy a weanling

This is a discussion on Want to buy a weanling within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Buying a weanling foal
  • Buying your first weanling

 
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    10-07-2010, 11:44 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation Want to buy a weanling

I have decided that I want to buy a weanling. Actually I have been wanting to for years and now I am ready, I think so at least. I have never dealt with a weanling before so asking for some advice here. Please let me know what I will need, feeding and bonding tips, concerns I need to be aware of. Please everybody let me know what I am in for if I buy a weanling.
     
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    10-07-2010, 11:53 PM
  #2
Weanling
They're a lot of work, but it pays off in the end if you do it right. My best- and really only- advice is to go through the process with someone well versed in bringing up babies.
     
    10-08-2010, 12:46 AM
  #3
Foal
Bonding tips? Same as any other, I guess. Soothing voices and lots of brushing.
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    10-08-2010, 01:41 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColtHearted    
Bonding tips? Same as any other, I guess. Soothing voices and lots of brushing.
Posted via Mobile Device
I know that sounded strange but I have heard different things from different people. I was told not to put the weanling in with another horse for awhile. By me being the only one interracting with the foal it will create a stronger bond.
     
    10-08-2010, 02:43 AM
  #5
Weanling
Weanlings- young horses in general- learn best from their herdmates, and most of all, their mothers. They learn how to interact like a proper horse, and learn boundaries. I find that foals that are overly handled- I.e. Kept away from a herd- or hand-raised- I.e. Raised by a human, relatively little herd interaction- are extremely pushy and rude. I much prefer weanlings to interact with older horses and learn that they aren't God's Gift to the Earth, and that they can and will be pummled if they are too pushy and disrespectful. The best 'bonds' I've seen and experienced with horses are not created from coddling the horse, they're from mutual respect, with the human as the leader of the two. Establish a hierarchy and demand respect while showing it to your foal when they've earned it, and you're well on your way.
     
    10-08-2010, 08:54 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charis    
Weanlings- young horses in general- learn best from their herdmates, and most of all, their mothers. They learn how to interact like a proper horse, and learn boundaries. I find that foals that are overly handled- I.e. Kept away from a herd- or hand-raised- I.e. Raised by a human, relatively little herd interaction- are extremely pushy and rude. I much prefer weanlings to interact with older horses and learn that they aren't God's Gift to the Earth, and that they can and will be pummled if they are too pushy and disrespectful. The best 'bonds' I've seen and experienced with horses are not created from coddling the horse, they're from mutual respect, with the human as the leader of the two. Establish a hierarchy and demand respect while showing it to your foal when they've earned it, and you're well on your way.
that makes sense to me, I have never dealt with a weanling but I know with puppies if they are taken from the mother too soon they don't know their boundaries, with food, playing, etc... Thanks
     
    10-08-2010, 08:59 AM
  #7
Green Broke
I have to agree with Charis on the bonding thing. I have and still am learning this. My filly was coddled and messed with and now as a yearling she is becoming very pushy and trying. Not something I can't train out of her but not something fun to have to do. It is soooooooo hard not to coddle and handle. They are so cute and fuzzy :). But handling them daily as in brushing, handling feet, leading, things that are teaching is what you want to do. Just remember to have fun with it and everything you do with it you are teaching. So be careful. Let us know when you get one and how things are going. I love to hear how day one goes and how things start to progress. Good luck
     
    10-08-2010, 12:49 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbender    
I have to agree with Charis on the bonding thing. I have and still am learning this. My filly was coddled and messed with and now as a yearling she is becoming very pushy and trying. Not something I can't train out of her but not something fun to have to do. It is soooooooo hard not to coddle and handle. They are so cute and fuzzy :). But handling them daily as in brushing, handling feet, leading, things that are teaching is what you want to do. Just remember to have fun with it and everything you do with it you are teaching. So be careful. Let us know when you get one and how things are going. I love to hear how day one goes and how things start to progress. Good luck
I will keep everybody posted.I haven't bought one yet, looking around. Here are a couple of pics of the one I am really liking right now. Let me know what you think of this filly.....


     
    10-08-2010, 12:58 PM
  #9
Showing
Wow, she's pretty. I do love her markings and that nice broad forehead she has. I have a horse that I love because he is the perfect respect teacher for babies. He is the herd alpha male and doesn't put up with hijinks. He taught my first foal respect (since momma was such a pushover), and I am looking forward to being able to turn my new weanling out with him. IMHO, a good alpha horse is a must have for weanlings and yearlings to be turned out with because they learn respect and humility the way that is best........from another horse.
     
    10-08-2010, 01:15 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Love the first one!!!
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