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Well, it looks like...

This is a discussion on Well, it looks like... within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        08-26-2013, 07:15 PM
      #11
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fkcb1988    
    I don't agree and wouldn't do a lot of what the OP does (or doesn't due) but I'm not into beating someone over the head over and over again. I went back and read the OP's other posts and read through all the comments. Everyone has given her excellent advise on how she should go about breeding her horse and confirming that the horse is actually pregnant. Now its time to just back off.
    You know I don't always go back and read a persons whole history, and my memory doesn't work that well, so I couldn't actually tell you any other threads the OP has had, all I can go on is this one, and waiting to see if she is in foal, well it is a risk that's all.
         
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        08-26-2013, 08:30 PM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    Well, folks, I hate to throw skunk in the bunkhouse, but I pasture-bred 5 mares to a son of Real Gun (AQHA Super Horse a few years back) and I don't have a clue which ones are in foal. They will tell me in a couple of months. I do not even know any breeding dates on any of them and they will all foal on pasture next spring. I bred 2 mares to my old horse, wrote down breeding dates but did not even check them back. I bred them pretty late and did not want them bred any later than that.

    Last year I bred 7 mares total and I have 7 foals about ready to wean right now. All of them were bred on pasture and foaled on pasture.

    These are ranch mares, not show mares and I did not pay a stud fee. I own the one stallion and borrowed (leased) the other that I pasture bred. He has never been hand bred and I was not sure he would hand breed so I just turned him out like he was used to. Many pasture stallions won't hand breed.

    So, the same guidelines do not fit for all situations. Ranches have been pasture breeding forever and ranches have foaled on pasture for generations. Yes, problems can come up. But when you have strong, healthy mares and let them run out on big pastures, don't over-feed them and don't pen them up where they do not get exercise, 99% or more of them will foal and raise a healthy baby with little or no intervention. The two mares and foals I have lost in the last 20 years would have died had I been right there. I had one mare abort a set of twins about 20 years ago.

    If you breed show mares and horses that are less hardy than the big, stout ranch mares we keep, you need a lot more management. The more you do that is unnatural, the more you risk a mare. If you are planning on a race or show colt or are paying a high stud fee or are shipping semen, then you obviously need a LOT more management. If you keep mares up and not out on big pastures or feed them too much grain, you are risking them.

    When I bred a lot of outside mares, they were palpated for ready follicles, Ultrasounded for twins, and a whole lot more. We did uterine cultures on everything other than maidens, used a lot of heat management with hormones and had 24 hour attendants at foaling time. Boy am I glad I am not doing that any more.

    Now that I quit raising NCHA Futurity Sale horses and only raise big, strong, healthy ranch horses that seem to be in great demand for saddle horses, I have gone back to what I did years ago. The horses know how to do it.

    I am not going to knock anyone who does not want to do all of the things possible to do at the highest level of management. The value of the mare, the cost of the stud fee and the potential value of the foal will dictate a lot of what should be spent. An older mare and a really valuable mare or a 'fragile' mares should have more management. Otherwise there is not any reason that costs and values should not be taken into consideration.
         
        08-26-2013, 09:14 PM
      #13
    Green Broke
    I don't see the logic in breeding a mare if you're not financially stable enough to have "extra money" . Especially with an older PREGNANT made and a foal on the way.


    Regardless. I wish you luck OP in this endeavor and hope that all goes smoothly with your mare.
    Wallaby and TheNinja like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 10:03 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    Cherie, the difference here is that if one of your mares was to get injured or have serious complications due to the pregnancy, you would be able to pay the Vet to come out and treat the horse or put the horse down if necessary. You have experience and KNOW what you are doing. You aren't a first-time, clueless breeder.

    The OP isn't saying that she feels an ultrasound isn't necessary in this case, she's saying she plain can't AFFORD it. If she cannot afford a simple test, how will she afford to feed a hard-keeping pregnant mare all Winter? How will she afford the Vet if the horse should need one or God-Forbid the Vet to put down and then disposal of the body if things go horribly, horribly wrong?

    There is a HUGE difference between a been-there, done it a million times breeder who knows enough to know what a pregnant horse MUST have and what is more for peace of mind for the owner and a completely clueless, never done this before owner who doesn't have the funds for suitable fencing, much less any variety of proper care.
    NdAppy, AlexS, TheNinja and 1 others like this.
         
        08-26-2013, 11:01 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Cherie I agree I do not ultrasound the mares I own that are bred by my stallions. Neither does my family they pasture breed the mares.
    Mares I send out to be bred by outside stallions and outside mares bred here are USed to see if the breeding was successful.
    My advice to britt is to get the US her financial means are not the same as ours. She has an older mare that is hard to keep in good condition.
    She is also very attached to the mare and probably could not afford to replace her.
    She IMO needs to take every precaution she can to avoid financial hardships and the loss of mare and or foal. Shalom
         

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