What did we do to deserve them?
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

What did we do to deserve them?

This is a discussion on What did we do to deserve them? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-17-2011, 12:10 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    What did we do to deserve them?

    Yesterday afternoon I went out into the pasture to just sit on my horse's back. I wasn't really asking her to do anything, and as a result she nodded off and began half-dozing in the sunlight. And I noticed something curious. As she dozed, she would sway ever so slightly, and if I ever started to come off balance (even if it was the slightest movement), I would feel certain muscles in her back twinge as she compensated for my failing seat, and I would find myself re-centered. Or, another instance, she put a leg up to rest, and it tilted her back at an odd angle. I wasn't about to fall, but I was certainly twisted rather uncomfortably, and in a few seconds she put her leg up and re-adjusted herself so that we both were in a comfortable position.

    I've heard before that "your horse naturally wants to be centered under you, and will do whatever it takes to do so-even if it means he's running around crooked", and I've heard of peoples' horses going to great lengths to take care of their rider and prevent them from falling, but I've never really understood or thought about it until now. I won't try to get all mushy about it, because I know it's probably more out of comfort for the horse due to the more even distribution of pressure than the affection it feels for the rider, but now I ask: why?

    Why would a horse want to be under us? Why do animals weighing over 1000 lbs allow themselves to be controlled and dominated by creatures at least 5 times smaller than they? Why is it that I can steer my horse with nothing more than the position of my legs, seat, and a piece of rope around her neck?

    Some may answer: well, it's the training and handling they receive that make them responsive to pressure. But even to that: why? Why would a horse allow itself to be taught manners and training cues, when a few good bucks or kicks would rid them of their rider/handler and leave them free to run back to their horsey buddies relaxing in the pasture? Even the bits and training gadgets we put on them offer no real means of control-if the horse really doesn't want to listen to us, we are fooling ourselves if we think a piece of metal in their mouth or a strip of leather around their head can stop them.

    Why do horses try and perform so honestly and willingly when so often they are mishandled (whether due to ignorance or legitimate cruelty)? I know I'm not perfect, and I know I still am not the greatest rider, but I try my hardest to learn and give the best of myself to my (and any other) horse. It irritates me when people cannot see that they are the problem, and if they stopped blaming their horse and everyone else for their issues, it would take but a minute to see that their horse is an exact reflection of themselves, and you're being foolish by finding the fault in others.

    Dogs offer us the same loyalty and willingness, but to me the horse-human relationship is the most fascinating simply because we are the most different. The fact that a massive prey animal and a tiny predator can learn to work together and form a "herd", of sorts, never ceases to amaze me. I know I'm getting all girly and sentimental, but everything about horses humbles and astounds me, and I am luckier than the world to I have them in my life.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-17-2011, 12:20 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    Amen! It's a beautiful thing.

    I sometimes find myself staring at my horse and wondering why the hell he puts up with me and all MY mistakes, and tries so hard to cerrect for them. It's touching and precious that sometimes HE is so patient and loving and I find myself asking why, also.

    Since I can't answer, I always just try to do my best to show/tell him how much I love and appreciate him and his willingness to find out what it is I'm asking him to do, and then do it. I am in complete awe of the love and generosity of not only him, but horses in general.

    Great post and girly sentimentality aside, I'm with you all the way.
         
        03-17-2011, 12:32 PM
      #3
    Foal
    Love your post..
         
        03-17-2011, 01:09 PM
      #4
    Started
    Horses aren't loyal like dogs. But that's one of the things I love about them. Dogs are loyal to the point of being blind. A lot of them would probably jump off the Sears Tower if their master told them to. And besides, I can't stand being fawned over. My horse makes me earn his affection and respect, it's not a given.

    As for why horses put up with so much... well, mine doesn't. He has no patience for my mistakes, and he's ground me into the dirt a few times to remind me. I wouldn't want it any other way. I don't understand why most horses do put up with it, though. It's amazing how complacent and stoic they can be.
         
        03-17-2011, 02:37 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jessabel    
    Horses aren't loyal like dogs. But that's one of the things I love about them. Dogs are loyal to the point of being blind. A lot of them would probably jump off the Sears Tower if their master told them to. And besides, I can't stand being fawned over. My horse makes me earn his affection and respect, it's not a given.

    As for why horses put up with so much... well, mine doesn't. He has no patience for my mistakes, and he's ground me into the dirt a few times to remind me. I wouldn't want it any other way. I don't understand why most horses do put up with it, though. It's amazing how complacent and stoic they can be.
    My horse is the same. I swear when I fall off she's like "haha, sucks to be you!", lol. She's also hates to be fawned over. She's happiest being left alone or being worked. Anything inbetween seems to annoy her.

    However, I don't like it that way. I wish she was more like the OP's horse, and like so many affectionate horses out there! I adore them :)

    I guess that's why I have an overly affectionate dog- to make up for my indifferent horse
         
        03-17-2011, 03:27 PM
      #6
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by petitepyromaniac    
    However, I don't like it that way. I wish she was more like the OP's horse, and like so many affectionate horses out there! I adore them :)
    For a long time, my mare was the same. She still dislikes you fawning and fussing over her. We went on a big trail ride on the weekend and since she was the quietest riding horse, all the little kids wanted to be petting her and cooing over her. She put up with it, but turned her head away, like: "Uh-leave me alone, you snotty little brats!" Poor mare-I don't like kids either, lol.

    It has taken us a long time to get to this point-I think it's only because she's really learning to see me as leader that she'll tolerate affection. Even so, I'm sparing-I try not to overstep her bounds and to be respectful enough to not be stroking and patting her all the time. I mean, if I were always touchy-feely, she'd put up with it (it's not like she'd have a choice), but when she's clearly not a lovey dovey horse like that, why bother? She's respectful to me, so I might as well offer at least some courtesy.

    She is really sweet though. She's so forgiving and kind and willing, and there's not a mean or malicious bone in her body. I really am lucky to have her.
         
        03-17-2011, 04:44 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    I had a mare like that when I was a kid. She knew with me she could get up and go but as soon as I would put my little brother up there, she was a sissy. As soon as we put him up in the saddle, she would start walking around the house and would not do more that that no matter how much he kicked her. She even saved me from a snotty bull a few times when I would walk through the pasture
         
        03-18-2011, 01:15 PM
      #8
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by petitepyromaniac    
    My horse is the same. I swear when I fall off she's like "haha, sucks to be you!", lol. She's also hates to be fawned over. She's happiest being left alone or being worked. Anything inbetween seems to annoy her.

    However, I don't like it that way. I wish she was more like the OP's horse, and like so many affectionate horses out there! I adore them :)

    I guess that's why I have an overly affectionate dog- to make up for my indifferent horse
    To each their own. I just don't like nosey, in-your-pocket, puppy-dog horses. Which is probably why I'm also a cat lover. XD My horse and I are two peas in a pod- both very solitary and stand-offish. MY horse also loves cats, believe it or not. Lol
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:20 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0