What does everyone think about "Natural Boarding?" - Page 2
 
 

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What does everyone think about "Natural Boarding?"

This is a discussion on What does everyone think about "Natural Boarding?" within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        12-06-2011, 08:44 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by farmpony84    
    I have my doubts. It's a really pretty place and it looks well kept, clean and safe. Putting the horses out in a large herd setting though can give you certain issues, such as having the horse be hard to catch and injuries from fighting or playing rough. The feed situation wouldn't work for at least two of my horses as one has no teeth and is prone to colic while the other would drop weight quickly without the extra source of protein. My other three would probably be ok. I have two that must have their hooves done regularly because of certain issues.

    I don't like the stalls because they can play fight over them or crib if they are bored, etc.

    Looks like the trainer is a parelli type person which is fine as long as you "don't drink the kool-aide" and keep your eyes wide open.

    I don't see MAJOR issues with the place and it is really pretty. I think it's a matter of what will work for you and your horse.

    Good luck in your decision!
    Thanks for your input! I do agree with the large herd setting part and that's why I am a little skeptical (I don't want my Boy getting hurt). And as for the stall set up, they put the horses near each other that get along, but i'm sure play fighting is still always an issue.
         
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        12-06-2011, 08:46 PM
      #12
    Foal
    @Cowchick77 Wow! Interesting...I had no idea! Thank you for the correction :)
         
        12-06-2011, 08:48 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Thanks everyone for the input! I am enjoying reading everyone's opinions
         
        12-06-2011, 08:49 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    I currently board my mare in a similar situation - she is barefoot and lives outside with a decent sized herd of horses year round. The facility has a two stall barn for horses that require stall rest due to injury, illness or foaling. My mare is not blanketed at all - instead, she stands with her herd and they seek shelter in the trees. She is healthy and happy, and while I worried at first about the herd dynamic, I found out very quickly that she has a boss mare personality (despite her seller warning me that she was timid) and she has not had any issues.

    As much as I'd love to just go and collect her from a stall rather than having to walk a paddock and catch her, I can't deny that she's happy. She gets exercise even if I can't get out there and she's not lonely. That's worth the trek across the field in freezing temperatures.
    KaylaMarie96 likes this.
         
        12-06-2011, 08:54 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KaylaMarie96    
    Oh I didn't know! Thank you for the correction :)
    I noticed that on their website...thats all. But I will add that the herd situation did work. All the geldings were together and all the mare were together. If a new horse was introduced then he was put in a panel pen in the corner so he could get to know his new herdmates over the panels first for a few days. If any horses required special requirements like supplements then at feeding time they were taken up to the barn to be fed then turned back out so they were not "beaten" out of their feed by a superior horse. It can work if it is done right. The gelding I had at the time was a hard keeper and usually at the bottom of the totem pole, sort of speak. And he did well there.
         
        12-06-2011, 08:58 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    I noticed that on their website...thats all. But I will add that the herd situation did work. All the geldings were together and all the mare were together. If a new horse was introduced then he was put in a panel pen in the corner so he could get to know his new herdmates over the panels first for a few days. If any horses required special requirements like supplements then at feeding time they were taken up to the barn to be fed then turned back out so they were not "beaten" out of their feed by a superior horse. It can work if it is done right. The gelding I had at the time was a hard keeper and usually at the bottom of the totem pole, sort of speak. And he did well there.
    I am a little nervous about introducing my guy to the other horses. He seems to get along with horse but his previous owner told me he has always been in a stall with a turnout (similar to the situation he is in now) so I don't know how he is going to react. I guess we have to take it one step at a time. I'm glad it worked out for your gelding!
         
        12-07-2011, 01:36 AM
      #17
    twh
    Weanling
    Didn't we have a thread about "Natural Boarding" recently?

    Ah, yes, here is is:
    Would you do Natural Boarding?
         
        12-07-2011, 03:31 AM
      #18
    Banned
    Sounds brilliant to me KaylaMarie96. I think you should go for it. I think most horses would prefer this. I don't agree that it ''causes'' 'herd sourness' or 'hard to catch' horses etc.
    Only the handler causes it if they do the wrong thing or don't do what's neccessary to prevent it in the first place.
         
        12-07-2011, 07:22 AM
      #19
    Banned
    Quote:
    Only the handler causes it if they do the wrong thing or don't do what's neccessary to prevent it in the first place.
    I disagree. Here's my example. Suppose you have a horse towards the bottom of the herd order; and he's turned out in a large herd, and when ever you go out to catch him, a dominant horse chases him away from you? You can catch the more dominant horse first, then your own, but it's time consuming and a pain. I don't see how that scenario, very common in herds, can be ascribed to bad handling.

    After managing horses and herds in lots of different ways, my preference is for small, even numbered, stable groups in paddocks together. 4 - 6 is ideal, when you get up to 8 or more, the herd dynamic tends to shift frequently enough that you have more squabbles and bites and kicks.

    However, this boarding situation *could* work for you with a couple of caveats - it will work best if your horse is easy going, middle of the pack type. If your horse tends to be extremely submissive, being out in a large herd maybe pretty hard on him. It will also work best if he's an average keeper. A very hard keeper will be difficult in this situation (though their willingness to feed separately is terrific) as will a very easy/prone to foundering type.

    Shoeless is great as it minimizes damage done in normal herd squabbling, however, whether or not it works for you depends on whether you've had your horse go barefoot while in work previouisly or you're committed to a barefoot regimen.

    It really just depends how well your ideas of horse management mesh with the facility's. In general, I absolutely agree, the closer to natural conditions you can get, the happier and healthier the horses. Where you introduce human convenience as a factor in the equation is a personal preference.

    Good luck, and hope you're happy with your eventual decision.
         
        12-11-2011, 04:05 PM
      #20
    Foal
    I went and talked to the owner of the place a couple days ago and they have a few different herds. One heard is for more easy going horses, and another is for more spirited horses. I think they have a few other groups of horses that they group together based on personality. They study your horse for a few days and decide which group he would fit best in.
         

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